planet.linuxaudio.org

July 28, 2021

digital audio hacks – Hackaday

How To Modify Your Car Stereo for Bluetooth or Aux-In

If you’re an automotive enthusiast of taste, you can’t stand the idea of fitting a janky aftermarket stereo into your nice, clean ride. Flashy, modern head units can spoil the look of a car’s interior, particularly if the car is a retro, classic, or vintage ride.

Thus, we’re going to look at how to modify your existing stock car stereo to accept an auxiliary cable input or even a Bluetooth module. This way, you can pump in the latest tunes from your smartphone without a fuss, while still maintaining an all-original look on the dash.

Fundamentals

A simple Bluetooth module designed for wiring into car audio systems. There are two wires for 12 V power from the vehicle, and the audio signal is sent out over the RCA plugs. The RCA plugs can be cut off and the module hard wired inside your stereo if you have room. Cutting off the plastic case can help too.

Depending on your choice of audio player, you may prefer a 3.5 mm aux jack, or you might want to go with Bluetooth audio if your smartphone no longer has a headphone port. Whichever way you go, the process of modifying the stereo is largely the same. To achieve your goal, you need to find a way of injecting the audio signal into the head unit’s amplifier stage, while making sure no other audio sources are getting sent there as well.

Whether that audio source is a 3.5 mm jack or a Bluetooth module doesn’t matter. The only difference is, in the latter case, you’ll want to buy a Bluetooth module and hardwire it in to the auxiliary input you create, while also splicing the module into the stereo’s power supply. In the case of a simple headphone jack input, you simply need to wire up an aux cord or 3.5 mm jack somewhere you can get to it, and call it done.

This guide won’t cover every stereo under the sun, of course. Edge cases exist and depending on the minute specifics of how your original car radio works, these exact methods may or may not work for you. However, this guide is intended to get you thinking conceptually about how such mods are done, so that you can investigate the hardware in front of you and make your own decisions about how to integrate an external audio input that suits your usage case.

Guide 1: Old School Radio/Cassette Decks

An old two-knob AM radio from a 1970s Ford Bronco, modified with an auxiliary input. Often it’s as simple as wiring in to the back of the volume pot.

If you’ve got something quite retro, this hack can be very simple indeed. This normally applies to radio/cassette players from the 1970s and early 1980s that have an analog volume knob on the front. In this case, the audio signal flows to the amplifier directly through the volume knob. Some kind of rudimentary switching decides whether the radio or cassette signals get to the volume knob and are then passed out to the amplifier section and on to the speakers.

Thus, there are a number of ways you can splice in your own audio on these units. The easiest is to cut the stereo audio traces or wires going to the volume knob, and hook them up to a DPDT toggle switch. Hook the volume knob’s wires up to the middle two pins of the switch, and hook the original stereo feed up to a pair of pins on one side. You can then wire in your new aux cord or Bluetooth input up to the other pins on the toggle switch. The toggle switch then selects between standard operation, or the external feed. Install that switch somewhere tidy and the job is done!

Alternatively, you might find that there’s a button on the deck that switches the radio into cassette mode whether or not a tape is inserted. In that case, you may be able to wire up your auxiliary audio into the cassette module’s audio output, and simply use the existing switches on the deck to select cassette mode. With no cassette in the deck providing a signal, only your external audio will be going through to the volume knob and then on to the speakers. Easier, and even cleaner!

Guide 2: Digital Era Radio/Cassettes and CD Players

This Volvo cassette player from 1987 is firmly in the digital era – note the LCD display.
Head units from this era are usually easy to hack, with relatively large components and traces inside and simple signal flows. The equalizer input could likely also easily be modified in a similar way to the Guide 1 method.

In the digital era, things get a touch more complicated. This refers to head units that use digital displays and push button controls, with a microcontroller running the whole show. Interestingly, many 1980s and 1990s radios used simple 4-bit microcontrollers, which had just enough capability to run a simple head unit while being presumably cheaper than the more usual 8-bit parts. Basically, if your 80s or 90s stereo has an LCD on it, this part of the guide may be for you.

Digitally-controlled decks typically use a chip called a mux or a multiplexer to determine which signal gets sent to the amplifier. The mux is basically a chip with many inputs and a single output. The main microcontroller in the head unit will typically control the mux chip, either by toggling a few GPIO pins or using a serial, SPI, I2C, or other interface. When a user presses the button for the FM radio, for example, the microcontroller will send a signal to tell the mux to route the FM radio input to the output to the amplifier. If they hit the button for tape, the microcontroller will instruct the mux to route out the tape audio instead.

The Hitachi HD14052BP in the middle of this image decides which audio gets sent out to the amplifier.

Thus, by controlling the mux, you can control the audio that gets to the amplifier and thus the speakers. Depending on the mux chip used, and how integrated it is with the rest of the hardware in the stereo, this can be easy or rather difficult.

Most muxes will be a variant of the 4051/4052 series. For example, an early 90s stereo using the Hitachi HD14052BP multiplexer is easily modified with an auxiliary input; simply flipping a few pins changes the mux’s input. Thus, with a properly wired switch, the mux can be told to select the cassette or CD input even when no cassette or CD is present. Simply then wire up your aux input to those same pins and you’re in business.

Guide 3: Modern-Era CD Decks

This Mercedes-branded head unit was built by Alpine.
It uses an integrated mux and signal processor, making it harder to hack an audio input into the stereo. The newer technology also uses finer-pitch surface mount parts, making it harder to work with for beginners.

More modern stereos can prove difficult, however. Often, the multiplexer is integrated into more complicated chips that handle multiple functions. To get the multiplexer to switch inputs, it often requires the use of a silent audio CD, or commanding these chips over interfaces like I2C, serial, or SPI. This is on top of the job of wiring in the auxiliary input into the tape, CD, or other audio input subsystem.

For instance, the Mercedes Audio 10 CD head unit, as produced by Alpine in the late 1990s, features the Philips TEA688OH signal processor IC. This chip handles volume, treble, and bass controls, as well as certain radio signal processing tasks while also acting as the multiplexer as well.

Wiring the auxiliary input into the CD input is simple enough, but getting the stereo to actually switch to that input is harder. Many elect to simply burn an audio CD with a silent track that lasts an hour. Inserting that into the deck gets the CD input selected, and the auxiliary audio can play through on top of the silent output from the CD itself. However, it’s an inelegant solution that requires the user to keep a disc on hand to switch into auxiliary mode, and it also means the mechanical disc player must be maintained in working order.

Here, an Arduino is used to command the TEA688OH signal processor (QFP chip top right) to switch inputs on command. A DPDT switch is used here to switch the I2C lines between the Arduino and the stereo’s own microcontroller. If the Arduino is left connected to the I2C lines instead, volume and other settings cannot be adjusted, so the switch is necessary. A relay allows the Arduino to automate switching the I2C control back and forth.

A more elegant solution in this case would be to force the TEA688OH to switch to the CD input, or another input, regardless of whether or not a CD was in the drive. This is quite possible, as the chip receives signals from the main microcontroller over I2C, and these are all listed in the chip’s datasheet. However, it requires adding in a Arduino or similar that can speak I2C, a DPDT relay, and some supporting components.

The I2C lines between the stereo’s microcontroller and the TEA688OH signal processor must be cut, and wired up to the relay. Under command from the Arduino, the relay normally routes signals from the stock microcontroller to the signal processor, allowing the normal control of volume and other features.

However, if the user wishes to switch to their aux input wired into the CD input, they can simply press a button hooked up to the Arduino. The Arduino then flips the DPDT relay, connecting its own I2C interface to the signal processor. Then, the command to switch inputs can be sent over I2C, and then control restored to the standard microcontroller so normal functionality of volume controls and such is resumed.

In final form, a Bluetooth module and Arduino Pro Micro are stuffed inside the stereo along with a DPDT relay to switch the I2C bus. An external button is used to trigger the Arduino to switch to auxiliary input on command.

Obviously, the latter case is much harder work, and requires knowledge around the use of microcontrollers and I2C communications. The final result is a lot more elegant, however, with the unit able to switch over to auxiliary input at the touch of a button. While the example given is for a specific Mercedes head unit, other OEM stereos from the era use similar components, and can be modified in a similar way. It’s simply a matter of finding a way to get your auxiliary input piped out to the amplifier subsection via the onboard multiplexer.

Appendix: CD Changer Inputs

Sometimes, you get lucky, and there’s a simple additional input already hanging off the back of your standard stereo. Often, stock stereos come with a CD changer input so that the option can easily be added to cars without changing over the basic head unit. These inputs typically come with analog audio inputs and even a power supply, with a rudimentary way of determining whether a CD changer is connected. In the case of the Kenwood standard CD changer input, it’s as simple as tying a certain pin to another via a resistor, and the head unit can be switched to the CD changer input and audio can be piped in.

A pinout for certain Kenwood CD changer inputs. However, be wary. There are many stereos out there with 13-pin CD changer inputs with completely different pinouts that aren’t compatible at all. Ask me how I know.

However, others are more complex. Certain luxury cars in the late 1990s use a digital audio input over optic fibre that is difficult to spoof with off-the-shelf hardware. Also, some head units use serial or other communication methods to control the CD changer and won’t switch to the input unless they receive the right messages back from the hardware. If you don’t have a CD changer already, it can be difficult to figure out how to spoof this communication as well.

It’s a great method if you can make it work, though. Often it allows a custom input to be hacked in without even opening the stereo. Old-school car audio hackers have been doing it for decades in cars like the Mazda Miata, swapping in their own audio inputs without spoiling the tasteful stock look of the original dash layout.

Summary

Overall, all you need to do to hack in an auxiliary audio input, whether Bluetooth or otherwise, is to get your signal to the amplifier in the place of any other. If you can figure out how signals are routed from the various subcomponents of the head unit – such as the CD player, tape deck, and radio modules – then you should be able to figure out how to route in your own signals instead. Hopefully this guide has served to illustrate the basic processes required so that you can figure out how to hack any stereo out there. Good luck, and if you pull off a particularly nice hack, send it in on the tip line. Have fun!

by Lewin Day at July 28, 2021 05:00 PM

July 26, 2021

Linux – CDM Create Digital Music

CHAIR made an amazingly realistic snare plug-in – get a CDM discount, then play it on a table

The Center for Haptic Audio Interaction Research have been busy - and they've made a snare model unlike any you've heard in software. CDM exclusive discount for you, and - table drumming. Really.

The post CHAIR made an amazingly realistic snare plug-in – get a CDM discount, then play it on a table appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

by Peter Kirn at July 26, 2021 04:14 PM

That new MPC 2.10 update proves to be a big hit with users, packed full of features

New plug-ins - and vocal tuning - and USB class compliant audio devices? MPC 2.10 is winning over users of the standalone MPC range.

The post That new MPC 2.10 update proves to be a big hit with users, packed full of features appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

by Peter Kirn at July 26, 2021 03:57 PM

July 25, 2021

blog4

The Big Crash exhibition Aalborg

In one week on the 1. August the new art space XM3 opens in Aalborg, Denmark and I am honoured to have the first exhibition there with my project The Big Crash - Art For The Pending Burst Of The Real Estate Bubble. My soloexhibition features some new art pieces I show the first time and can be visited from 1. till 25. August.



by herrsteiner (noreply@blogger.com) at July 25, 2021 07:02 PM

July 24, 2021

blog4

The Big Crash VR at ICMC2021

The Mozilla Hubs version of The Big Crash VR is featured in the XR Music section of this years International Computer Music Conference ICMC 2021. Of course you can visit it anytime at

https://hubs.mozilla.com/ufU2mgo/the-big-crash




by herrsteiner (noreply@blogger.com) at July 24, 2021 08:58 PM

July 22, 2021

News – Ubuntu Studio

Ubuntu Studio 20.10 Has Reached End-Of-Life (EOL)

As of July 22, 2021, all flavors of Ubuntu 20.10, including Ubuntu Studio 20.10, codenamed “Groovy Gorilla”, have reached end-of-life (EOL). There will be no more updates of any kind, including security, for this version of Ubuntu.

If you have not already done so, please upgrade to Ubuntu Studio 21.04 via the instructions provided in the release notes for Ubuntu Studio 21.04.

No version of any operating system can be supported indefinitely, and Ubuntu Studio is no exception.

Regular Ubuntu releases, meaning those that are between the Long-Term Support releases, are supported for 9 months and users are expected to upgrade after every release with a 3-month buffer following each release.

Long-Term Support releases are identified by an even numbered year-of-release and a month-of-release of April (04). Hence, the most recent Long-Term Support release is 20.04 (YY.MM = 2020.April), and the next Long-Term Support release will be 22.04 (2022.April). LTS releases for official Ubuntu flavors (not Desktop or Server which are supported for five years) are three years, meaning users are expected to upgrade after every LTS release with a one year buffer.

by eeickmeyer at July 22, 2021 10:00 AM

July 21, 2021

The Linux-audio-announce Archives

[LAA] (no subject)

SampleHive - A simple, modern audio sample browser/manager for GNU/Linux.

SampleHive lets you manage your audio samples in a nice and simple way,
just add a directory where you store all your samples, or drag and drop a
directory on it to add samples to it, and it will help sort, search, play
and view some information about the sample.

Github: https://gitlab.com/samplehive/sample-hive
Releases:
https://gitlab.com/samplehive/sample-hive/-/releases/v0.8.4-alpha.1
Website: https://samplehive.gitlab.io/website/

by apoorvs569 at gmail.com (bashScript) at July 21, 2021 07:43 PM

July 16, 2021

KXStudio News

Carla 2.3.1 has been released

This is a bugfix for Carla version v2.3 series, fixing many bug reports and stuff I found along the way.

Carla is an audio plugin host, with support for many audio drivers and plugin formats.
It has some nice features like automation of parameters via MIDI CC (and send output back as MIDI too) and full OSC control.

Changelog

  • Add NSLocalNetworkUsageDescription and NSMicrophoneUsageDescription in macOS builds
  • Allow canvas eyecandy for Qt >= 5.12
  • Alternative approach to deal with JACK postponed events (improves PipeWire usage)
  • Implement parameter groups for VST2 plugins
  • Ignore hosts calling Carla-VST effOpen twice (don't print errors)
  • Listen to Windows and X11 plugin UI resize events (without extensions)
  • Make some macOS dialogs modal
  • Remove favorite plugins from list when they fail to load
  • Update JUCE plugin code to new APIs, hook into VST2 for feature parity with native implementation
  • Use new tick_double for JACK transport
  • Use posix_spawn to launch macOS bridges
  • Fix available decimal points on a few dialogs being incorrect
  • Fix bridged plugin UIs appearing behind main carla window on macOS
  • Fix canvas auto-refreshing on exit, potentially leading to crash
  • Fix canvas split/join action
  • Fix carla-vst-wine symbol visibility
  • Fix default rack "skin" for a few plugins
  • Fix initial size for LV2 UIs with no UI resize extension (all OSes)
  • Fix loading state of Windows/macOS VST2 plugins without chunk
  • Fix macOS binaries not being debug/symbol stripped
  • Fix midi-pattern plugin having double notes on transport reposition
  • Fix race condition (and potential crash) around postponed RT events
  • Fix Qt >= 5.10 version checks
  • Fix unused JACK latency callbacks (removed)
  • Fix X11 UIs not having keyboard focus

Downloads

To download Carla binaries or source code, jump on over to the KXStudio downloads section.
If you're using the KXStudio repositories, you can simply install "carla".
Bug reports and feature requests are welcome! Jump on over to the Carla's Github project page for those.

Notes for users

This was already the case for v2.2 and v2.3 but it is worth reiterating:
When using JACK2, the canvas - plugin integrations requires at least JACK2 v1.9.13.
This is because Carla relies on JACK meta-data in order to store information about each plugin/client, and meta-data was only added to JACK2 in version 1.9.13.
Alternatively, you can use JACK1 instead of JACK2, which has meta-data support since a long time.
Note that the "extras" KXStudio repository (which provides an updated JACK2) supports both Ubuntu 18.04 and 20.04.
The UbuntuStudio backports PPA also provides updated JACK2 packages.

There are no official Linux binary builds for v2.3.1 at this point.
Carla v2.3.1 is provided in the KXStudio repositories and in many official Linux distribution repositories too anyway.

by falkTX at July 16, 2021 02:42 PM

JACK Audio Connection Kit News

JACK2 v1.9.19 release

A new version of JACK2 has just been released.
You can grab the latest release source code at https://github.com/jackaudio/jack2/releases and macOS/Windows installers at https://github.com/jackaudio/jack2-releases/releases.

This release focuses on 2 main things: jack_position_t::tick_double addition and forced alignment of a few internal data structures. A few other fixes were made as contributed by developers.

This relase adds tick_double to the jack_position_t struct and JackTickDouble as a validation flag for it. Since older versions of JACK do not expose this variable, the macro JACK_TICK_DOUBLE is provided, which can be used as build-time detection.

The alignment change is because the packed structure layouts as used in JACK2 need to be naturally aligned in order to be accessed atomically in some systems. A non-aligned read or write can result in a “Bus error”, which brings down jackd. This seems to only be relevant on certain ARM systems, as JACK2 was obviously working before this change for most people.
As a consequence of this change, the internal protocol version was bumped to 9, which requires the restart of the JACK server after the update.

The official changelog is:

  • Add jack_position_t::tick_double, and flags around it
  • Add zalsa “-w” argument to wait for soundcard to be available
  • Bump internal protocol version to 9 (due to struct alignment)
  • Fix alignment of fields for atomic accesses
  • Fix build for platforms needing __STDC_FORMAT_MACROS
  • Fix compilation of documentation

External changes, related to macOS/Windows installer:

  • Fix macOS microphone permissions on qjackctl macOS app bundle
  • Update qjackctl to 0.9.4

Now, for the rationale behind the transport tick_double API update:

When using JACK transport to sync between clients with precise timing requirements (such as MIDI sequencers) rounding errors would accumulate and eventually make the separate clients out of sync.
This was observed in Carla and mod-host, which use audio plugins as JACK clients. Some MIDI plugins could miss notes due to rounding errors. This change has been deployed in MOD Devices for a couple of releases already and it is known to work (that is, it corrects the situation).

There were discussions on IRC about this potentially be unnecessary, that clients can just use bar_start_tick to store the non-integer part of the tick.
While the idea could work in theory, supporting it turns out to be non-trivial and from all applications that I have tested none implemented this part correctly.
Some applications do not set bar_start_tick at all, even though they can be run as transport master.

So since the transport API has padding members available for use and it has been unchanged for several years (so there won’t be a need to add more fields in the short or middle term), well let’s just go for it.

Here is example code for transport-listening clients:

double tick;
#ifdef JACK_TICK_DOUBLE
if (pos.valid & JackTickDouble)
    tick = pos.tick_double;
else
#endif
    tick = pos.tick;

by falkTX at July 16, 2021 01:41 PM

July 15, 2021

The Linux-audio-announce Archives

[LAA] OMK Quarterly releases 2021-3

____                      __  ___           _
  / __ \____  ___  ____     /  |/  /_  _______(_)____
 / / / / __ \/ _ \/ __ \   / /|_/ / / / / ___/ / ___/
/ /_/ / /_/ /  __/ / / /  / /  / / /_/ (__  ) / /__
\____/ .___/\___/_/ /_/  /_/  /_/\__,_/____/_/\___/
    /_/
    __ __            __             ____
   / //_/___  ____  / /__________  / / /__  __________
  / ,< / __ \/ __ \/ __/ ___/ __ \/ / / _ \/ ___/ ___/
 / /| / /_/ / / / / /_/ /  / /_/ / / /  __/ /  (__  )
/_/ |_\____/_/ /_/\__/_/   \____/_/_/\___/_/  /____/

Quarterly releases 2021-3
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
   __     ___  ___      __
  / /  __|_  |/ (_)__  / /_
 / / |/ / __// / / _ \/ __/
/_/|___/____/_/_/_//_/\__/


*Check whether a given LV2 plugin is up to the specification*


An LV2 lint-like tool that checks whether a given plugin and its UI(s) match up
with the provided metadata and adhere to well-known best practices.

Run it as part of your continuous integration pipeline together with
lv2/sord\_validate to reduce the likelihood of shipping plugins with major flaws
in order to prevent unsatisfied users.

*Note: This is an early release, if you happen to find false-positive warnings
when using this tool, please report back, so it can be fixed.*



---------
ChangeLog
---------

======================
[0.14.0] - 15 Jul 2021
======================

-----
Added
-----

- libx11 as optional dependency to README

-------
Changed
-------

- code cleanup/speedup by using static URIDs


This is free software: you can redistribute it and/or modify
it under the terms of the Artistic License 2.0 as published by
The Perl Foundation.


Kindly find more details, the source (and binaries) at:

https://open-music-kontrollers.ch/lv2/lv2lint

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
   __  ___
  /  |/  /__  ___  ___  __ __
 / /|_/ / _ \/ _ \/ _ \/ // /
/_/  /_/\___/\___/_//_/\_, /
                      /___/

*Realtime Lua as programmable glue in LV2*


Write LV2 control port and event filters in Lua. Use it for one-off fillters,
prototyping, experimenting or glueing stuff together.



---------
ChangeLog
---------

======================
[0.40.0] - 15 Jul 2021
======================

-------
Changed
-------

- Lua version to 5.4.3

-----
Fixed
-----

- compilation error with concurrently enabled inline display and next gui
- meson subproject sandbox error


This is free software: you can redistribute it and/or modify
it under the terms of the Artistic License 2.0 as published by
The Perl Foundation.


Kindly find more details, the source (and binaries) at:

https://open-music-kontrollers.ch/lv2/moony

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
   ___       __      __   __  ___     __      _
  / _ \___ _/ /_____/ /  /  |/  /__ _/ /_____(_)_ __
 / ___/ _ `/ __/ __/ _ \/ /|_/ / _ `/ __/ __/ /\ \ /
/_/   \_,_/\__/\__/_//_/_/  /_/\_,_/\__/_/ /_//_\_\


*a JACK patchbay in flow matrix style*


A simple graphical JACK patchbay that tries to unite the best of both worlds:

- Fast patching and uncluttered port representation of a **matrix patchbay**
- Excellent representation of signal flow of a **flow canvas patchbay**

It additionally features tightly embedded graphical mixer clients automatable
with JACK MIDI/OSC.



---------
ChangeLog
---------

======================
[0.26.0] - 15 Jul 2021
======================

-----
Fixed
-----

- meson subproject sandbox error
- use _exit instead of exit inside forked process
- oroperly clip client node names
- increase height of context window
- limit right click for context menu to canvas region

-------
Changed
-------

- removing nodes needs right button + ctrl

---------
Deprecate
---------

- JACK session management


This is free software: you can redistribute it and/or modify
it under the terms of the Artistic License 2.0 as published by
The Perl Foundation.


Kindly find more details, the source (and binaries) at:

https://open-music-kontrollers.ch/lad/patchmatrix

by dev at open-music-kontrollers.ch (Hanspeter Portner) at July 15, 2021 10:01 PM

July 11, 2021

digital audio hacks – Hackaday

Digital Audio for Microcontrollers Doesn’t Come Much Simpler Than a WART

Adding an audio channel to your microcontroller project can mean a pile of extra components and a ton of processing power, as a compressed stream must be retrieved and sent to a dedicated DAC. Or if you are [rdpoor], it can mean hooking up a low-pass filter to the UART that’s present on even the simplest of devices, and constructing a serial data stream that mimics PWM audio.

Sound on your microcontroller, it’s this simple!

WART is a Python script that converts a WAV file into a C formatted byte array that can be baked into your microcontroller code, and for which playback is as simple as streaming it to the UART. The example uses a Teensy and a transistor to drive a small speaker, we’re guessing that better quality might come with using a dedicated low-pass filter rather than relying on the speaker itself, but at least audio doesn’t come any simpler.

The code can be found in a GitHub repository and there’s a few recordings of the output in the files section Hackaday.io page, one is embedded below. It’s better than we might have expected given that the quality won’t be the best at the PWM data rate of even the fastest UART. But even if you won’t be incorporating it into your music system any time soon we can see it being a useful addition for such things as small warning sounds. Meanwhile if persuading serially driven speakers to talk is of interest, there’s always the venerable PC speaker.

by Jenny List at July 11, 2021 08:01 PM

July 10, 2021

rncbc.org

Qtractor 0.9.23 - An Early-Summer'21 Release batch #3


Hello again, one third and last time...

But happy to announce yet another point release of, drum roll please...

Qtractor 0.9.23 (early-summer'21) is out!

Changes for this hot season are just but a few, nothing heartbreaking:

  • Dropped the 'Activate' option on the plug-in Selection dialog, now being as always on by default.
  • Have some tolerance for JACK buffer-size changes, only prompting to a complete session reload, if increasing in double the initial period size.
  • Introducing plug-in blacklisting, on user discretion (in View/Options.../Plugins/Blacklist) and on inventory scan (crashed plug-ins are now automatically blacklisted).
  • Added special support for LV2 UI GTK2 plugins based on Gtkmm 2.4 framework.
  • All builds default to Qt6 (Qt >= 6.1) where available.
  • CMake is now the official build system.

Description:

Qtractor is an audio/MIDI multi-track sequencer application written in C++ with the Qt framework. Target platform is Linux, where the Jack Audio Connection Kit (JACK) for audio and the Advanced Linux Sound Architecture (ALSA) for MIDI are the main infrastructures to evolve as a fairly-featured Linux desktop audio workstation GUI, specially dedicated to the personal home-studio.

Website:

https://qtractor.org

Project page:

https://sourceforge.net/projects/qtractor

Downloads:

https://sourceforge.net/projects/qtractor/files

Git repos:

https://git.code.sf.net/p/qtractor/code
https://github.com/rncbc/qtractor.git
https://gitlab.com/rncbc/qtractor.git
https://bitbucket.org/rncbc/qtractor.git

Wiki (outdated; help wanted, please):

https://sourceforge.net/p/qtractor/wiki/

License:

Qtractor is free, open-source Linux Audio software, distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL) version 2 or later.

Keep the fun && Stay safe, always!

Donate to rncbc.org using PayPal Donate to rncbc.org using Liberapay

by rncbc at July 10, 2021 11:00 AM

July 07, 2021

rncbc.org

Vee One Suite 0.9.23 - An Early-Summer'21 Release batch #2


Hello again!

The Vee One Suite of old-school software instruments,

  • synthv1, as a polyphonic subtractive synthesizer;
  • samplv1, a polyphonic sampler synthesizer;
  • drumkv1 as yet another drum-kit sampler;
  • padthv1 as a polyphonic additive synthesizer.

Are all being released as the second batch of the so called QStuff* (northern) Early-Summer'21 season.

Notable changes for this season are as follows:

  • Fixed some ages old Glide/portamento potential crash bug (as reported by AnClark, while on synthv1; also applies to samplv1 and padthv1).
  • Add support for LV2 UI Windows platform (by AnClark, also while on synthv1).
  • Sustenuto pedal controller (MIDI CC#66) is now implemented.
  • Fixed old Sustain/Damper/Hold pedal controller (MIDI CC#64) note-off processing. (also implemented new on drumkv1)
  • Have some tolerance for buffer-size changes.
  • All builds default to Qt6 (Qt >= 6.1) where available.
  • CMake is now the official build system.

As usual, all delivered in dual form:

  • a pure stand-alone JACK client with JACK-session, NSM (Non Session Management) and both JACK MIDI and ALSA MIDI input support;
  • a LV2 instrument plug-in.

The Vee One Suite are free, open-source Linux Audio software, distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL) version 2 or later.

And again in detail...

 

synthv1 - an old-school polyphonic synthesizer

synthv1 0.9.23 (early-summer'21) is released!

synthv1 is an old-school all-digital 4-oscillator subtractive polyphonic synthesizer with stereo fx.

LV2 URI: http://synthv1.sourceforge.net/lv2

website:
https://synthv1.sourceforge.io
http://synthv1.sourceforge.net

project page:
https://sourceforge.net/projects/synthv1

downloads:
https://sourceforge.net/projects/synthv1/files

git repos:
https://git.code.sf.net/p/synthv1/code
https://github.com/rncbc/synthv1.git
https://gitlab.com/rncbc/synthv1.git
https://bitbucket.org/rncbc/synthv1.git

 

samplv1 - an old-school polyphonic sampler

samplv1 0.9.23 (early-summer'21) is released!

samplv1 is an old-school polyphonic sampler synthesizer with stereo fx.

LV2 URI: http://samplv1.sourceforge.net/lv2

website:
https://samplv1.sourceforge.io
http://samplv1.sourceforge.net

project page:
https://sourceforge.net/projects/samplv1

downloads:
https://sourceforge.net/projects/samplv1/files

git repos:
https://git.code.sf.net/p/samplv1/code
https://github.com/rncbc/samplv1.git
https://gitlab.com/rncbc/samplv1.git
https://bitbucket.org/rncbc/samplv1.git

 

drumkv1 - an old-school drum-kit sampler

drumkv1 0.9.23 (early-summer'21) is released!

drumkv1 is an old-school drum-kit sampler synthesizer with stereo fx.

LV2 URI: http://drumkv1.sourceforge.net/lv2

website:
https://drumkv1.sourceforge.io
http://drumkv1.sourceforge.net

project page:
https://sourceforge.net/projects/drumkv1

downloads:
https://sourceforge.net/projects/drumkv1/files

git repos:
https://git.code.sf.net/p/drumkv1/code
https://github.com/rncbc/drumkv1.git
https://gitlab.com/rncbc/drumkv1.git
https://bitbucket.org/rncbc/drumkv1.git

 

padthv1 - an old-school polyphonic additive synthesizer

padthv1 0.9.23 (early-summer'21) is released!

padthv1 is an old-school polyphonic additive synthesizer with stereo fx

padthv1 is based on the PADsynth algorithm by Paul Nasca, as a special variant of additive synthesis.

LV2 URI: http://padthv1.sourceforge.net/lv2

website:
https://padthv1.sourceforge.io
http://padthv1.sourceforge.net

project page:
https://sourceforge.net/projects/padthv1

downloads:
https://sourceforge.net/projects/padthv1/files

git repos:
https://git.code.sf.net/p/padthv1/code
https://github.com/rncbc/padthv1.git
https://gitlab.com/rncbc/padthv1.git
https://bitbucket.org/rncbc/padthv1.git

 

Have fun && Stay safe && Healthy!

Donate to rncbc.org using PayPal Donate to rncbc.org using Liberapay

by rncbc at July 07, 2021 07:00 PM

July 05, 2021

KXStudio News

Changes in the extra KXStudio repositories regarding JACK2

This is a small notice to everyone using JACK2 with the extra KXStudio repositories. (those for Ubuntu 18.04 and 20.04)

A change in the JACK2 code has made it so a restart of the server is required after the update.
The technical reason for this is an internal ABI change due to forced-alignment in a few struct/classes.
This change is required for some ARM platforms where non-aligned access results in a bus error.

If you use jackdbus (likely with KXStudio stuff), you will need to actually kill it. (or use the usual cadence-session-start -s command)
If that does not work, good old restart is your friend. :)

This small update brings JACK2 v1.9.19 early, as a way to get a little more testing before official release.
That said release is planned for July 15.

by falkTX at July 05, 2021 09:16 PM

July 02, 2021

Ardour 6.8 released

Ardour 6.8 is now available. We previously announced that 6.7 would be the final release for older platforms, but in the weeks since then we’ve accumulated several important bug fixes and a couple of new features. We felt better with a final “old system” release in the best possible shape it could be, and so … here we are.

For more details, please read the whole release announcement .

Download as usual from https://ardour.org/download

3 posts - 3 participants

Read full topic

by Paul Davis at July 02, 2021 08:23 PM

June 28, 2021

GStreamer News

GStreamer Rust bindings 0.17.0 release

A new version of the GStreamer Rust bindings, 0.17.0, was released.

As usual this release follows the latest gtk-rs release.

This is the first version that includes optional support for new GStreamer 1.20 APIs. As GStreamer 1.20 was not released yet, these new APIs might still change. The minimum supported version of the bindings is still GStreamer 1.8 and the targetted GStreamer API version can be selected by applications via feature flags.

Apart from this, the new version features a lot of API cleanup, especially of the subclassing APIs, and the addition of a few missing bindings. As usual, the focus of this release was to make usage of GStreamer from Rust as convenient and complete as possible.

The new release also brings a lot of bugfixes, most of which were already part of the 0.16.x bugfix releases.

A new release of the GStreamer Rust plugins will follow in the next days.

Details can be found in the release notes for gstreamer-rs.

The code and documentation for the bindings is available on the freedesktop.org GitLab

as well as on crates.io.

If you find any bugs, notice any missing features or other issues please report them in GitLab.

June 28, 2021 11:00 PM

June 15, 2021

GStreamer News

IRC Channel has moved from Freenode to OFTC

Due to the widely reported issues at the Freenode IRC network, the official GStreamer discussion IRC channel has moved to #gstreamer on the OFTC IRC network alongside other Freedesktop projects.

You can connect to it with your existing IRC client, or using Matrix which has a browser client and native apps for all platforms.

For more information, please see the mailing list announcement.

June 15, 2021 08:30 AM

June 12, 2021

Talk Unafraid

Pandemic A/V

I’m sure this post’s been done a million times over by now, but enough people at work have asked me how my video/audio looks/sounds so good, that at this point it’s quicker to have a blog post to point at!

I’m pretty sorted for audio and video for videoconferencing. Given my days are usually back-to-back video calls, that’s fairly important to me – I want people to be able to see me clearly and hear me clearly (and ideally vice versa, but that’s not always the case). Non-verbal communication is important for effective communication, especially with difficult topics and emotional issues.

In the past I’ve been almost entirely audio-only – playing games with friends, that’s all you need, and that’s most of what I did, chatting on Mumble etc. The de rigeur for this is a decent headset or a separate mic/headphone pairing – headphones for spatial awareness (thanks to HRTFs), but also to avoid feedback.

Audio, as it was (Feb 2020)

My setup at the time was a 2nd generation Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 – a well-loved and widely used 2 in, 2 out (stereo pair + headphone) USB audio interface. Into this I had plugged a custom breakout/switch box which went to a Beyerdynamic DT109. The DT109’s a weird headset – it’s the microphone-equipped version of the classic DT100 you’ll see in old (and some new) BBC music videos etc, primarily designed for camera operators and the like.

This had a few issues – the 2i2 occasionally fell over and just spat crackly audio at the PC, and the DT109 microphone was designed for clarity, not quality. Which is to say I was entirely intelligible but didn’t quite sound myself. However, it basically worked. I used the headphone jack for my headphones, and the main outputs fed my monitor speakers (a pair of Genelec 8320s and a 7350 subwoofer).

I did have an old webcam – a Microsoft thing which purported to do HD – but it wasn’t much to write home about. Good enough for occasional family Skype, but nothing special.

Limitations of space and budget

At no point did I want to spend a fortune on all this, but I should caveat the below by saying I’m doing all this in a pretty tiny cottage in which my “office” is also my partner’s office, a bedroom, and part-time workshop.

I’m not so constrained by budget – and I am very much of the opinion that if you go “cheap” you end up buying the expensive one down the line and paying 50% more (at least) in the end. However, I do strongly recommend the approach espoused by Adam Savage on tools – if you’ve not got one and have no experience, buy the cheapest possible thing and then decide if it’s worth it to you to have a good one. You’ll get a better understanding of what makes a good one, and be able to make better decisions. Plan accordingly!

Enter COVID-19 (March 2020)

My usual working pattern was to be in the office/lab every day. I’m very close to the office, so this isn’t so much of a drag, and a lot of what I do is to do with things, physical bits of plastic and metal and glass, so being able to get my hands on stuff is pretty key.

When the pandemic hit I realised I’d be videoconferencing and spending a lot of time at home, so I figured I had to fix a few things:

  1. Ergonomics – so I wouldn’t end up with chronic RSI/carpal tunnel or back issues
  2. Video – so people could see me and I could have proper conversations
  3. Audio – so I could be heard clearly and well, and without background noise

Ergonomics

Ergonomics were fairly easy – I’ve had a Herman Miller Aeron for a while which works very well for me as a chair. I swapped my cheap-as-chips desk from an office surplus store for a Fully Jarvis electronic standing desk, and I try to stand up for half a day at least every other day. I got a “moving mat” to stand on, which is crucial both for comfort and to keep you moving around a bit as you stand.

Standing desks (of the moving type) also force you to think carefully about cable management and monitor positions, and I adjusted my monitor mounting setup a few times just to get everything movable. I have four monitors – one of which is also a drawing tablet (which is a godsend for engineering discussions). All but one are mounted on simple and cheap VESA arms of the solid-pole-and-clamp variety.

Video

I started out by buying a cheap chroma key background (greenscreen) and stands. I figured I had a lot of crap in the background of my shot – rather unavoidable mess (though my partner will disagree) that I’d rather avoid. At the time, AI-based “cutouts” were pretty basic and I knew how to make chroma key work.

I also added three lights, which I still use today. I don’t get much natural light in this room, with a tiny window.

They’re cheap “Neewer” brand dual colour temperature LED panels. I mounted them on cheap ceiling spigots and in one case a clamp – they have the “Manfrotto” standard spigots for which there are a lot of cheap and cheerful mounting options and tools available. I also put them on cheap TP-Link smart plugs so I can switch them off and on with my phone. These are a lot cheaper than things like the Elgato Key Lights, and though the light quality isn’t as good as “proper” cine lights like things from Aputure they’re good enough (they measure as having a CRI of about 93 on my meter).

I set up the lights in a key/fill/backlight setup and I’ve not adjusted them since – I have them set to produce a rough 5000K output (with 3000K on the back light, for some contrast) at about half their maximum brightness, which is plenty.

I stuck to my Microsoft HD camera for the time, and it worked OK.

Audio

I decided to make quite minor adjustments to my audio setup. I wanted a better microphone, and a switch in my DT109 breakout box died, so I dug out some old DT250s and bought a Rode NT1-A condenser microphone kit. This worked pretty well but picked up a lot of background noise, being a nice sensitive omni condenser.

I still had a bunch of issues with the Focusrite, but at the time didn’t want to spend a bunch on the box I wanted to replace it with, so stuck with it for the time being.

Software

To glue it all together I used the fabulous Open Broadcaster Software, OBS. This is open source and powers probably 95% of streamers and commercial internet broadcasts, esports, and so on. It’s incredibly powerful but also pretty simple.

My OBS setup was simple:

  • Camera video came in and used the in-built “Chroma Key” filter to produce video that was just me, cropped to just capture my face/head
  • I put a background image behind me (or fed in a “VLC Source” from an IP camera in the garden for a “live” background)
  • Audio went through a basic noise reduction filter and a compressor

To actually get this as a usable feed in all my videoconferencing tools I used Virtual Audio Cable (VAC) on Windows to take the “monitor” output from OBS and present it as a new system audio input, and used the OBS Virtualcam plugin to present the output of OBS as a virtual webcam input. OBS has since added a native virtual camera, so this isn’t needed any more.

Basically, I boot up OBS and get a nice confidence monitor for video and audio levels. Then anything like Teams gets pointed at the virtual inputs and it’s none the wiser that I’m fiddling around with the inputs.

And this worked really well! I had lots of control over what people saw, and though the cropped HD feed was a bit rubbish in terms of resolution the lighting worked well.

Skip to the endgame – March 2021

Over the course of a year, I replaced almost every element I’ve described above. Some of this was for reasons other than videoconferencing – I’ve been getting into making “music” with some synthesisers, which drove a lot of the audio side.

The key upgrades that actually made a difference were the microphone, the audio interface/mixer, and a new webcam.

Software improvements over the last year have also made a big difference to things.

Video

I spent maybe a month with a borrowed camera from work – a Nikon Z6 with a Zeiss 50mm/f1.2 Milvus F-mount lens. I hooked this up with a HDMI-to-USB box, and used OBS to sync the audio up (as this came with about 120ms of video delay). This produced fabulous video and I could use an Atomos Ninja HDMI monitor as a screen to look at right next to the camera. It also let me nicely defocus the background and lose the greenscreen – blurry mess with pretty bokeh from some fairy lights isn’t quite so objectionable!

However, it couldn’t move with my desk, and was a huge bulky thing to deal with. So rather than go buy something similar and make that setup permanent, I decided to just upgrade my webcam and go down the AI route as the cheaper option.

My camera is a Logitech Brio 4K. For a while these were unobtanium, being the best reasonably-priced webcam out there – but eventually I nabbed one and it was a huge upgrade from the Microsoft one. Colour science is still a bit odd but I could fix the white balance setting to match my lighting conditions which helped consistency a lot. The extra resolution let me crop and still get a HD stream for OBS.

I added XSplit into the mix, which is a software tool that separates you from background. I just use this to apply a modest blur in the background. It’s nowhere as nice or consistent as a good lens with shallow depth of focus, but it works pretty well for what it is and doesn’t need a huge lens, so my camera can still perch on top of my monitor and move with the desk.

Besides that, I’ve not done much. I tinkered with LUTs a bit to do colour correction but found that if I get the white balance locked off I don’t really need it.

Audio

Audio I did a lot on.

I’m an audio nerd at heart, and as I was getting into synths and wanting more in the way of flexibility, I opted to go fairly high end on this stuff.

In the end I replaced the NT1-A with a Shure SM7B on a desk-mounted arm – the classic “streamer/vlogger” mic for good reason, since it’s a dynamic mic with a good pickup pattern and nice and robust. It doesn’t pick up much background noise.

This needs a really good preamp with lots of gain to work, though, since it’s dynamic. The traditional approach is to use a phantom powered box like a Cloudlifter to add in another 20dB of gain, but this adds noise and another bit of kit, so I opted to just get some better preamps, since I also wanted to add some more audio inputs to my PC.

I did this by adding a Solid State Logic SiX mixer, which is not something I’d generally recommend to anyone not also doing music stuff. It’s a stupidly versatile desk with incredibly good preamps, tons of routing options, great built-in compressors, lots of monitor control options, and also costs several arms and legs. Much cheaper options are available, like SSL’s new USB interfaces. This did a great job of replacing some of the functions of the Focusrite and providing some superb preamps. It’ll last me for decades to come and also accommodates all my current synths as inputs with room to spare.

I’d originally run this into the Focusrite but finally tired of all the crashes and glitches and replaced that with a RME Fireface. Again, high end, but very solid and reliable which is what I wanted. I don’t run it in its highest-end mode – I use 96kHz/24-bit which lets all the aliasing filters have plenty of space without delving to madness like 192kHz audio. The preamps are actually good enough to directly use the SM7B, so I could skip the SiX for that, but for now I’ll stick to the SiX preamps.

The headphones I’ll probably upgrade – the 250s are pretty good all-rounders but aren’t great for all-day wear.

Software

I haven’t changed a lot – I still use OBS and VAC to make everything apper as virtual inputs. However, I now use NVIDIA’s new noise reduction filtering in OBS, along with a Solid State Logic native VST plugin to de-ess and de-pop. This removes the worst silibances from my speech and worked out a lot cheaper than buying a hardware unit to do the same.

XSplit keeps improving, so that’s worked out pretty well.

What I’d recommend

There’s lots of good advice on the budget/low-end of things, so I’ll stick to what I’d recommend if you wanted a “really good” setup that was going to give you a superb output.

  • Video: Logitech Brio or Canon’s EOS-M videoconferencing kit, and whatever lighting makes sense for your environment
  • Audio: SSL 2/2+ with Shure SM7B, or a Shure/Rode lapel mic kit
  • Software: OBS, NVIDIA’s noise-removal plugin, and the built-in plugins or VSTs of your choice for any audio compression etc

The Canon EOS-M based VC kits are pretty solid as a step up from a webcam and are actually light enough to mount on a monitor if you wanted to. They’ll give you much better video than a webcam could ever do. However, the Brio is pretty solid.

Lighting is the biggest thing to upgrade for most people. I’d avoid ringlights – get LED panels, or COB lights that can accept diffusers. There’s tons out there which will work great, even the cheap ones are a whole lot better than having nothing.

For noise, get a good interface like the SSL 2/2+ or RME Fireface/Babyface that can handle the SM7B. Alternatively, Shure now have a SM7B-alike which has USB built in, which makes matters easier. My partner uses a Rode USB mic which works very well, too. These USB mics will have built-in headphone amplifiers that’ll suit most headphones and in-ear options, and let you put a bit of sidetone in so you can hear yourself without latency.

Software – OBS is unbeatable, I think. It’s certainly so widely used that it’s the best supported thing out there.

For multiple cameras there are things like VMix, but honestly I’ve done mad things with OBS. I can use NDI over our VPN to pull in video from our lab’s camera system and switch my own video out for it – I’ve used this to remotely pan/tilt a camera over to a demonstration unit on the wall, switch my face for the lab camera, and talk engineers through problems they’re having, for instance. You can do an awful lot with free software (though do donate to the OBS team).

by James Harrison at June 12, 2021 09:35 PM

May 27, 2021

Www Youtube Tony Robbins

Robert Kiyosaki is most famous for his book Rich Dad Poor Dad. Among the most common financial books that also recommend here. In this book he explains how he was brought up by two very rich fathers. They taught him a totally different way on the best way to lead life. One of these even mortgaged his house to cover Robert’s college and another made him head chef in his own restaurant. He basically was made to feel that he is royalty and should act that way.

Kiyosaki explains in this book how he thinks about running a small business. First of all he identifies the four major types of people who run businesses. Then after making sure everybody falls into one of those categories, he explains what his philosophy of life is based on. The four categories of individuals are money hungry, money-conscious, productivity mindful, and cashflow oriented. Robert Kiyosaki uses the cashflow quadrant of direction to explain why some people are successful and others aren’t.

He uses the passive income method to describe ways to make passive income without having to work for it. Robert Kiyosaki says that with this passive income you don’t have to worry about working for something. In this passive income technique, Robert Kiyosaki uses the story of his father poor Dad who worked long hours and never enough to make ends meet but always had enough to provide for his loved ones.

Robert Kiyosaki says that by being honest with yourself and with others you can determine what your true purpose is in life and you will be able to help other people accomplish what they want out of life. Robert Kiyosaki explains that most people are searching for meaning but don’t know where to find it and they’re scared to ask for assistance. This is the most important main difference between the successful people in life and the unsuccessful individuals in life. The most successful people in life are people who ask questions and are honest with themselves.

The most important thing you can learn from Robert Kiyosaki and life lessons from Napoleon Hill is to always growing and expanding your mind and your opportunities. Robert Kiyosaki says you could transform your wallet from poor to rich if you would like to be rich. Robert Kiyosaki says if you would like to be successful then you have to enlarge your beliefs and constantly growing. Robert Kiyosaki’s and Napoleon Hill’s books are fantastic resources for learning about yourself and how to use the law of attraction to manifest your dreams.

Robert Kiyosaki explains many of these secrets in his new book, Rich Dad Poor Dad: How to be Rich and at the Same Time Be Really Poor. He explains many of these secrets through stories from his own experiences and from his work with other millionaires. Robert Kiyosaki shows you ways to avoid making the mistakes so many people do and why these mistakes keep happening to so many people. Robert Kiyosaki also explains why most wealthy people don’t seem to have any regrets, even after making millions of bucks. He also tells you how you can use the same power to manifest abundance in your life and earn money even if you don’t have a lot of spare time.

You will find many other interesting and practical ideas in Robert Kiyosaki’s financial publications, Rich Dad Poor Dad and the law of attraction. These financial books are really helpful if you want to achieve financial freedom and to eliminate debt. Kiyosaki says that all you’ve got to do is to change your mindset and begin using the principles that will allow you to create a more positive financial future. He explains how these principles will let you create endless wealth, even in your retirement. This book will also inspire you to become actively involved in creating wealth and financial freedom for your future and for your children as well.

Robert Kiyosaki says that there’s no such thing as a fantastic mistake, only bad decisions. If you make a great decision, you will end up somewhere better than where you started. If you make a poor decision, you will most likely end up worse off than before. This book teaches you how you can prevent failure by making the proper decisions and making smart choices. Robert Kiyosaki wants you to realize that you can’t live the life you want if you don’t understand financial basics and how to apply them towards creating financial abundance to your loved ones.

by test at May 27, 2021 06:31 PM

Www Youtube Com Tony Robbins

Robert Kiyosaki is most famous for his book Rich Dad Poor Dad. One of the most popular financial books which also recommend here. In this book he explains how he was brought up by two very wealthy fathers. They taught him a completely different way on how best to lead life. One of them even mortgaged his house to pay for Robert’s college and the other made him head chef at his own restaurant. He basically was made to feel that he is royalty and should act like that.

Kiyosaki explains in this book how he thinks about running a business. First of all he explains the four major types of people that run businesses. Then after making certain everybody falls into one of those categories, he explains what his philosophy of life is based on. The four categories of people are money hungry, money-conscious, productivity mindful, and cashflow oriented. Robert Kiyosaki uses the cashflow quadrant of direction to explain why some people are successful and others are not.

He uses the passive income strategy to explain ways to make passive income without having to work for it. Robert Kiyosaki says that with this passive income you do not have to worry about working for something. In this passive income technique, Robert Kiyosaki uses the story of his dad poor Dad who worked long hours and never enough to make ends meet but always had enough to provide for his family.

Robert Kiyosaki says that by being honest with yourself and with others you can determine what your true purpose is in life and you’ll have the ability to help other people accomplish what they want out of life. Robert Kiyosaki explains that most individuals are searching for meaning but do not know where to find it and they’re scared to ask for assistance. This is the most important primary difference between the successful people in life and the ineffective people in life. The most successful people in life are those who ask questions and are honest with themselves.

The most important thing you can learn from Robert Kiyosaki and life lessons from Napoleon Hill is to always growing and expanding your mind and your opportunities. Robert Kiyosaki says that you can transform your wallet from poor to rich if you want to be rich. Robert Kiyosaki says if you want to be successful then you have to expand your beliefs and constantly growing. Robert Kiyosaki’s and Napoleon Hill’s books are great resources for learning about yourself and how to utilize the law of attraction to manifest your dreams.

Robert Kiyosaki explains many of these secrets in his new book, Rich Dad Poor Dad: How to be Rich and at the Same Time Be Really Poor. He explains many of these secrets through stories from his own experiences and from his work with other millionaires. Robert Kiyosaki shows you how you can avoid making the mistakes so many people do and why these mistakes keep happening to so many men and women. Robert Kiyosaki also explains why most wealthy people don’t seem to have any regrets, even after making millions of bucks. He also tells you how you can use this same power to manifest abundance in your life and make money even if you don’t have a great deal of spare time.

You will find a number of other interesting and practical ideas in Robert Kiyosaki’s financial books, Rich Dad Poor Dad and the law of attraction. These financial books are really helpful if you want to attain financial freedom and to eliminate debt. Kiyosaki says that all you have to do is to change your mindset and start utilizing the principles that will allow you to create a more positive financial future. He explains how these principles will enable you to create endless wealth, even in your retirement. This book will also inspire you to become actively involved in generating wealth and financial freedom for your future and for your children also.

Robert Kiyosaki says that there is no such thing as a fantastic mistake, only bad decisions. If you make a great decision, you’ll wind up somewhere better than where you started. If you make a poor decision, you will most likely end up worse off than before. This book teaches you how you can prevent failure by making the right decisions and making smart decisions. Robert Kiyosaki wants you to understand that you can’t live the life you want if you don’t know financial basics and how to apply them towards creating financial abundance for your family.

by test at May 27, 2021 06:31 PM