planet.linuxaudio.org

March 02, 2015

Hackaday » digital audio hacks

An Upgrade To A Raspberry Pi Media Server

For the last few years, [Luke] has been running a music server with a Raspberry Pi. With the new Raspberry Pi 2 and its quad core processor, he thought it was time for an upgrade.

The build consists of a Raspi 2, a HiFiBerry Dac to address the complaints of terrible audio on the Pi, an aluminum enclosure, and some electronics for IO and a real software shutdown for the Pi. The Arduino also handles an IR remote and a rotary encoder on the front of the enclosure.

The software is the Logitech Media Server along with Squeezeslave. The front end is custom, though, with functions for shutdown and receiving IR remote codes. Everything is served up by Flask, with a 32GB microSD card stuffed into the Pi to store MP3s. All in all, a great build.


Filed under: digital audio hacks, Raspberry Pi

by Brian Benchoff at March 02, 2015 03:00 AM

February 28, 2015

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

Date set for MuseScore 2.0 release candidate

Fans of MuseScore will be happy to know that version 2.0 is getting closer. A date for the release candidate has now been set for March.

Full details about the release schedule can be found at the MuseScore forum.

You'll also find a useful rundown of the features in the up and coming 2.0 release on this blog post.
 

by Conor at February 28, 2015 07:08 PM

Hackaday » digital audio hacks

DSP 01: Real, Legit Audiophile Goodness

About six months ago, we saw [tshen2]’s work on the DSP 01, a 2-input, 6-output DSP and crossover for extreme audiophiles, and we’re not talking about oxygen free rooms here. The DSP 01 turns a USB audio output into six outputs that will give you perfectly flat eq across bass, mids, and highs, integrates with a 6x100W amplifier, and compensates for room noise. There was a huge update to the project recently and [tshen] is more than happy to share the details

Getting to this phase of the project hasn’t been without its problems. To get the DSP communicating to a computer through a USB port, [tshen2] found a potential solution in the CP2114 USB to I2S Bridge. This device should function as a USB audio sink, translating digital audio into something the DSP understands. This chip did not work in [tshen]’s design. The CP2114 simply does I2S wrong; the I2S spec says the clock must be continuous. This chip implements I2S with a SPI, firmware, and a few other things, making it incompatible with to-spec I2S.

While there was some problems with getting audio in to the device, the core of the device has remained unchanged. [tshen2] is still using the Analog Devices DSP, with the interesting SigmaStudio being used to compensate for the frequency response of the room. This real, legit, science-based audiophile territory here, and an impressive development for a field that – sometimes understandably – doesn’t get the respect it deserves.


Filed under: digital audio hacks

by Brian Benchoff at February 28, 2015 06:00 AM

February 26, 2015

linux.autostatic.com » linux.autostatic.com

Wolfson Audio Card for Raspberry Pi

Just ordered a Wolfson Audio Card for Raspberry Pi via RaspberryStore. I asked them about this audio interface at their stand during the NLLGG meeting where I did a presentation about doing real-time audio with the RPi and they told me they would ship it as soon as it would become available. They kept their word so I'm hoping to mount this buddy on my RPi this very week. Hopefully it will be an improvement and allow me to achieve low latencies with a more stable RPi so that I can use it in more critical environments (think live on stage). It has a mic in so I can probably set up the RPi with the Wolfson card quite easily as a guitar pedal. Just a pot after the line output, stick it in a Hammond case, put guitarix on it and rock on.


Wolfson Audio Card for Raspberry Pi

by Jeremy at February 26, 2015 09:45 PM

PipeManMusic

Jury Duty

Here is an account of my recent trip to the county court house to fulfill my civic duty right up until I was selected and served on a jury. Enjoy!

First observation, great place to people watch. 

Only one of the the security lines running, very long line, I doubt other two x-ray machines are even plugged in, they are just there to torment me with the possibility. While in line I discover wood chips in my hoody pocket, hope I don't have to explain that in a pat down.

Only place on earth there are people grumpier than me. Lady on phone behind me would rather clean a dirty toilet than be here or so she says loudly to the person on the other end of the conversation. I'd rather not do either or here about it from her.
They miss pronounced my last name over intercom. It's a common English word, go judicial/educational system. 

We are all Given a name tag that just says "Juror", everyone obediently wearing them like sheep, I judge them. I'm just wearing mine to be ironic so it looks cool on me. I still don't really know what ironic means. That song really fucked me up. 

The sign on fancy automatic coffee maker, just above dispensing nozzle says, not a drain. Must be an interesting story there. Size options on machine are as follows, coffee bean, cup, coffee bean, I chose cup, but secretly wished I tried coffee bean. Later, tried coffee bean option, said "invalid option" on LCD screen, at least the machine is aware of the paradox even if it's incapable of changing it. Chairs designed to not let a cup sit flat, no where to set cup, another well thought out form of torture.

Selected in the first round to move on, I finally found what I'm lucky at. Yay.

Questionnaire asked my favorite t.v. show, author and type of music. I think the people who wrote the form got tired of where people work. They are people watchers too. I think I miss spelled Vonnegut, attempt to seem smart backfired on me again, go educational system.
More newspapers than tablets, more hardback books than tablets. Like they are all from a different universe. Old people still not using smart phones when bored, I don't know how to solve this problem but I imagine it involves hard candy in some way. 

Saw guy that looks like Kurt Vonnegut, not the best celebrity to look like. I didn't tell him he looked like him, I'm sure he gets told that a lot. 

They let us have a fifteen minute break, only options are smoking and eating junk food at a bad cafeteria, go society. I chose writing this on my tablet and looking smug. 

Got called to a court room in first round, go universe that is constantly against me.
Took stairs to fourth floor court room instead of elevator to feel superior to everyone else, instead I'm just breathing heavily like a creeper. More cardio could be in order. 

Everyone is sitting on one side of benches, when I ask "Is the other side is off limits?" everyone smiles politely and shrugs, they are sheep, I sit on the other side and everyone after me follows my lead, I'm a trailblazer. 

Felony vehicular eluding, sounds fun.

Just found out, Jehovah's witness don't serve on jury's, a tiny upside to religion. 

I can't seem to win at anything in life ever, except getting selected to be a juror. I don't know what message the universe is trying to send me but I suspect it's just drunk dialing

by Daniel Worth (noreply@blogger.com) at February 26, 2015 01:09 PM

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

ZynAddSubFX 2.5.0 is now available

The 2.5.0 Release of ZynAddSubFX is now available.

This release is mainly focused on fixing some of the core architectural flaws that have historically existed. As a result this release should behave much better under jack and interfacing with the realtime side of things is much easier now.

For full details, check out fundamental's post over at linuxmusicians.com

by Conor at February 26, 2015 09:47 AM

Guitarix: First Steps Towards New Design

Due to a recent call from the Guitarix devs for a graphic designer, Markus Schmidt from Calf Studio Gear has got in touch with them and taken on the task. For those who don't know who Markus is, he has not only created a lot of the Calf plugins but is also the guy responsible for their graphical interfaces.

by Conor at February 26, 2015 08:15 AM

February 25, 2015

linux.autostatic.com » linux.autostatic.com

LAC2014: submission accepted!

My submission for the Linux Sound Night at LAC2014 with The Infinite Repeat has been accepted. The Call for Papers page mentions the term "danceable" so I'm going to focus on that. Making danceable music is quite a challenge for me but it should definitely be doable to produce a solid set, especially now that I'm the proud owner of a Korg Volca Keys. I'm definitely going to integrate it in my current setup as the Volca reacts great on MIDI sent from my workstation. It has some fat sounds that just scream dance floor.


Korga Volca Keys

I'm really looking forward to this year's LAC. It seems falkTX and avlinux are going too, it'd be great to meet these guys in real life!

by Jeremy at February 25, 2015 08:40 PM

Linux Audio Users & Musicians Video Blog

ams-lv2 modular synth plugin

Aurélien Leblond has been working hard to port Alsa Modular Synth to an LV2 plugin. The results speak for themselves.

He has also released the Deteriorate plugin which you can see a demo of here too.

by DJ Kotau at February 25, 2015 07:34 AM

February 24, 2015

Hackaday » digital audio hacks

We Assume Control: SPI and a Digital Potentiometer

In the last video I demonstrated a Universal Active Filter that I could adjust with a dual-gang potentiometer, here I replace the potentiometer with a processor controlled solid-state potentiometer. For those that are too young to remember, we used to say “solid-state” to differentiate between that and something that used vacuum tubes… mostly we meant you could drop it without it breakage.

Using SPI to set Cutoff of Low Pass Filter

Using SPI to set Cutoff of Low Pass Filter

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UAF42 Filter with Dual Ganged Pots

UAF42 Filter with Dual Ganged Pots

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The most common way to control the everyday peripheral chips available is through use of one of the common Serial Protocols such as I2C and SPI.  In the before-time back when we had only 8 bits and were lucky if 7 of them worked, we used to have to memory map a peripheral or Input/Output (I/O) controller which means we had to take many control and data lines from the microprocessor such as Data, Address, Read/Write, system clocks and several other signals just to write to a couple of control registers buried in a chip.

Nowadays there is a proliferation of microcontrollers that tend to have built-in serial interface capability it is pretty straightforward to control a full range of peripheral functions; digital and analog alike.  Rather than map each peripheral using said data and address lines,which is a very parallel approach,  the controller communicates with peripherals serially using but a handful of signal lines such as serial data and clock. A major task of old system design, mapping of I/O and peripherals, is no longer needed.

Using Digital to Control Analog

Two serial interfaces have risen to the top of the heap as far as prevalence: I2C and SPI.  I2C is a more sophisticated protocol that arbitrates who should do the talking and is basically bidirectional meaning that the data input pin can double as a data output. I2C also implies peripheral IC’s that have pre-assigned addresses and since the receivers are addressable, all can be connected together on the same I2C bus.  I2C is all the better if you don’t have to debug it which I have had to do in the earlier days of the protocols existence, (but that was a while back).

SPI and I2C Protocol ComparisonSPI and I2C Protocol Comparison

I consider SPI, short for Serial Peripheral Interface, to be more of an attitude than a strict protocol as I have seen various specifications for how clocks and selects work so it is usually worth checking the details if designing for production. At the heart of SPI is a separate Chip Select for each device and a dedicated data input and output.  On the plus side the data lines don’t have to worry about being bidirectional or having to deal with contention, and so they are designed as true active high and active low driven lines whereas I2C has a passive pull-up which may limit maximum speeds or loads.

In this instance I chose the digital potentiometer that I wanted and let that determine the Serial Protocol. In the video you will see the various controllers and processors that I looked at and settled on the Hackaday Pro Trinket for the simple reason it has a Hackaday skull on it.

Hackaday Pro TrinketHackaday Pro Trinket

A quick download of the IDE and I was able to speak to the module via the bootloader.  Perusing the built-in examples gives us not only an SPI based project written in ”C” but also one of the two SPI examples is for a digital potentiometer.  I have elected to use the MCP4161 Digital Potentiometer and even though it is a different part than the SPI example, the changes needed to the code are minor.  Looking at the datasheet we find that writing a value of zero first and then a second value which indicates the resistance value of the potentiometer as a $00-$FF hexadecimal range of 256 steps.  The example code sits in a loop incrementing both bytes so I changed the first byte to $00 and left the incrementing code alone as being useful for our demonstration here and recompiled.

SPI Protocol Writing to Digital PotentiometerSPI Protocol Writing to Digital Potentiometer

My original plan was to demonstrate the digital pot and the filter it controlled on one PCB but ran into problems with the compatibility of too many power supplies, the grounds and even the voltage drop of the long USB cable I used to drive the demo from across the room.  Using a small solderless breadboard it was straightforward to hook up the digital pots to the SPI bus and then swap them in place of the dual ganged pot.

 

Active Filer, Digital Potentiometer and Hackaday Pro TrinketActive Filer, Digital Potentiometer and Hackaday Pro Trinket

If you didn’t see the previous video, I use a sweep frequency generator to demonstrate the effects of our adjustable filter.  The function generator starts by outputting a low frequency and then quickly sweeping up to a higher frequency.

This has the effect that a properly triggered oscilloscope displays low frequencies on the left side of the display and high frequencies to the right.  The frequency response of the filter as it moves between the low and high frequencies is seen as moving between the left and right sides of the display where the x direction indicates frequency.

Low Pass Filter Sweep - Left to Right

Low Pass Filter Sweep – Left to Right

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Using SPI to set Cutoff of Low Pass Filter

Using SPI to set Cutoff of Low Pass Filter

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lp3

Like our last demonstration the filters are seen moving up and down the range only now it is under the control of a simple C program and not a manual adjustment.  Picture if you will, then an analog synthesizer that instead of a carefully calibrated control voltage to manage oscillators, filters and other effects, all while tracking each other closely without worrying about linearity or temperature affecting the accuracy of the control.

An Analog View

Finally, to visually demonstrate that digitally controlled potentiometer really does emulate a variable resistor I hooked up my old Simpson 260 Volt Ohm Meter (VOM) that I have had since I was 16.  Let’s just say that means I have had it for almost 40 years. Setting the VOM to resistance and remembering that Zero ohms is a deflection to the right the effects of the incrementing potentiometer are readily seen.

Simpson 260 showing an SPI controlled Digital PotentiometerSimpson 260 showing an SPI controlled Digital Potentiometer

This was just a simple example of having a processor control our analog project.  These days I automatically assume that there will be a serial control bus or two in any sizable project.


Filed under: ATtiny Hacks, digital audio hacks, Featured, slider

by Bil Herd at February 24, 2015 03:00 PM

February 23, 2015

Hackaday » digital audio hacks

Making a Homemade Stephen Hawking

It isn’t easy communicating when you have any form of speech impairment. In such cases, a Speech-generating device (SGD) becomes essential to help you talk to the world. When coupled with other ailments that limit body movement, the problem becomes worse. How do you type on a keyboard when you can’t move your hands, and how do you talk when your voice box doesn’t work. Well known Scientist Stephen Hawking has been battling this since 1985. Back then, it took a lot of hardware to build a text entry interface and a text to speech device allowing him to communicate.

But [Marquis de Geek] did a quick hack using just a few parts to make a Voice Box that sounds like Stephen Hawking. Using an arcade push button to act as a single button keyboard, an Arduino, a 74HC595 shift register, a 2-line LCD, and the SP0256 hooked to an audio amplifier / speaker, he built the stand-alone speech synthesizer which sounds just like the voice box that  Stephen Hawking uses. Although Dr. Hawking’s speech hardware is quite complex, [Marquis de Geek]’s hack shows that it’s possible to have similar results using off the shelf parts for a low cost solution.

There aren’t a lot of those SP0256-AL2 chips around. We found just a couple of retailers with small stock levels, so if you want to make one of these voice boxes, better grab those chips while they last. The character entry is not quick, requiring several button presses to get to the character you want to select. But it makes things easier for someone who cannot move their hands or use all fingers. A lot of kids grew up using Speak and Spell, but the hardware inside that box wasn’t the easiest to hack into. For a demo of [Marquis de Geek]’s homemade Hawking voice box, check the video below.


Filed under: digital audio hacks

by Anool Mahidharia at February 23, 2015 06:00 PM

Create Digital Music » open-source

Add a Physical Knob to Your Max Patch with Arduino: Video Tutorials

Patching on a computer involves plugging something into something else virtually. In this video tutorial, you can extend that by adding a physical knob to control your custom creations, for Max/MSP (and Max for Live).

It’s just a quick tip, but I know this gets asked a lot. (Greetings, students – happy spring semester to you!) And there’s something really fun about seeing a knob in the real world controlling something. Bonus points for using a toilet paper roll as a custom “housing.”

It’s also nice seeing this accomplished in the all-new Max 7.

And this is just the start, part of a project extending beyond Max/MSP to free tools like Pure Data, JavaScript, and Python. The basic idea is a set of techniques for real-world control, backed by free code/patch examples and video tutorials. The creator explains:

Arduivis is a bi-directional communication paradigm for programming languages & microcontrollers. The purpose of this project is to explore and expand the interconnectivity possibilities of music, art and science. The general idea revolves around using an Arduino, or a microcontroller with serial capability, as a communication hub. This hub can be programmed to handle with several types of interactions from a selected programming language. Currently, this project is compatible with MaxMSP, Pure Data, Python and NodeJS.

More videos include this Max-to-light example: “Controlling an LED in Max with an Arduino in under 40 seconds”

And for users of other environments…

Here’s NodeJS:

http://cskonopka.github.io/arduivis/nodejs

And Python:

http://cskonopka.github.io/arduivis/python

And, including free patch downloads, Pure Data (no Pd video yet):

http://cskonopka.github.io/arduivis/puredata

The post Add a Physical Knob to Your Max Patch with Arduino: Video Tutorials appeared first on Create Digital Music.

by Peter Kirn at February 23, 2015 03:48 PM

February 22, 2015

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

DrumGizmo v0.9.8 released

Drumgizmo v0.9.8 has just been released. Beside the usual minor bug fixes, there has also been a lot of work done on the command line version of Drumgizmo.

by Conor at February 22, 2015 03:50 PM

February 21, 2015

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

New release of ams-lv2 plugins

Aurélien Leblond has just announced version 1.1.0 of ams-lv2, which are LV2 plugin ports of the internal modules found in Alsa Modular Synth.

The two main "features" of this version are:

by Conor at February 21, 2015 05:39 PM

February 20, 2015

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

AV Linux forums have moved!

Update your bookmarks! In case you haven't noticed, the AV Linux forums have recently been moved. You can now find the forums at - http://geekconnection.org/remastersys/forums/index.php

by Conor at February 20, 2015 12:22 PM

February 19, 2015

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

New Calf Studio Gear demos

Markus Schmidt has posted a new video demonstrating the many plugins of the Calf Studio Gear suite. The Calf developers are currently working towards a new stable release. The version of Calf used in the screencast is 0.0.60pre2+. Check it out!

by Conor at February 19, 2015 07:48 PM

Guitarix design - Work in progress

The Guitarix devs have done a redesign of their rack units. If you have any feedback, let them know.

Also, they are still looking for anyone interested in helping them do a complete redesign of Guitarix, so if you are handy with graphics do get in touch with the Guitarix guys.

by Conor at February 19, 2015 09:42 AM

Hackaday » digital audio hacks

A Class D Amp Made From Scrap

[Boolean90] needed an amplifier for a subwoofer, and had a lot of parts sitting around in a scrap bin. His project, a Class D sub amp made out of scrap, is a great example of what you can build with the right know-how and a very large pile of junk.

With digital logic and PWM chips, a Class D amp is one of the simpler ways to get a lot of amplification easily in an efficient package. It’s really not that complicated; an audio signal is turned into a PWM’d square wave, this is sent out to a Mosfet bridge, and finally out to the speaker.

Most Class D amps have a switching frequency of hundreds of kilohertz to the Megahertz range, but since this is an amplifier for a subwoofer that has a cutoff frequency of about 1kHz, the switching frequency doesn’t need to be quite as fast. [Boolean] is using a 50kHz carrier frequency; it’s more than high enough to recreate low frequencies.

With the completed project, [Boolean] has an extremely loud amplifier that has around 75-150W of output power. The subwoofer is only rated for 200W, but with the volume [Boolean] is getting, this isn’t an amp he’ll be rebuilding anytime soon.


Filed under: digital audio hacks

by Brian Benchoff at February 19, 2015 12:00 AM

February 18, 2015

Hackaday » digital audio hacks

A Real-Time Networked VU Running on the ESP8266

Even though the ESP8266 WiFi chipsets are really cheap (and can be somewhat challenging to work with), they still pack a lot of processing power. For instance, [Mr.jb.swe] took one of these modules and made a stand-alone live VU meter with WS2812B LED strip. The VU runs entirely on the ESP chip, without any additional microcontroller. It’s an example we think a lot of projects could follow to do away with unused horsepower (extra microcontrollers) sometimes used to avoid programming directly on the ESP. The stuff you can do with these modules is wild… did you see this WiFi signal strength mapping project?

The ESP chipset acts as a UDP client which receives packets from a WinAmp plugin that [Mr.jb.swe] wrote. The plugin continuously calculates the dB of whatever track is playing and streams it over WiFi to his ESP8266. He also mentions that the ADC of the ESP chipset could be used to sample audio as well, although that pretty much eliminates the need for WiFi.

The whole setup is very responsive even though the processor is parsing UDP messages, driving the WS2812 strip, and driving a small OLED display for debug—and it doesn’t even use a separate microcontroller. [Mr.jb.swe] also posted snippets of his code to get you started on your own project. Check out the videos after the break to see it in action.


Filed under: digital audio hacks, wireless hacks

by Ethan Zonca at February 18, 2015 06:01 AM

Recent changes to blog

Working on the design

Some people claim about that they didn't like the design of the guitarix rack/units.
I've tried to find designers who like to create new interfaces for us, but, up to now, I'm failed. So, even if I'm not a designer, I try to improve the view of the GUI a bit. Here is with what I'm coming up so far, a single rack-unit, done in cairo.
rack-unit

Here is how it looks in the rack:
guitarix-rack

Comments are welcome,

by brummer at February 18, 2015 04:59 AM

February 16, 2015

rncbc.org

rtirq update - 2015 edition

just in time for the mardi gras, rtirq has been updated ;)

http://www.rncbc.org/archive/#rtirq

original packages are available:

rtirq-20150216.tar.gz
rtirq-20150216-35.src.rpm
rtirq-20150216-35.noarch.rpm

DISCLAIMER: rtirq only makes sense on PREEMPT_RT or threadirqs enabled kernels (>= 2.6.39).

cheers && enjoy

by rncbc at February 16, 2015 06:30 PM

Create Digital Music » open-source

A Toe-Tapping, Dancing 3D-Printed Robot Plays Music

Making Music With Poppy from Pierre Rouanet on Vimeo.

It can “learn” to tap its toe and bob its head. And then it can make sounds as you move its arms. It’s a robotic interface for music – a bit like playing with a very smart toy doll.

To show off its interactive/interfacing abilities, the team behind Poppy used music.

Poppy is a robot that can be produced with a 3D printer. All the hardware and software are fully open source. The idea – fused with cash from the EU’s European Research Council for funding science and creativity – is to help teach, as well as to empower engineers, scientists, and researchers. Apart from getting kids excited by being really cool, robotics are an excellent way to explore ideas in physical space, honing skills around logic as well as programming.

poppy_components

The combination of robotics and teaching has a long, proud history; look no further than the Logo programming language and the educational Turtle robot. See the founding pioneers of creative computing who led that effort, like roboticist and neuroscientist William Grey Walter, Wally Feurzeig, AI pioneer Seymour Papert, and notably Cynthia Solomon. Solomon helped create Logo, but also took that R&D to Apple and Atari, which brought it to the masses – I was a child of that effort, experiencing Logo for the first time on the Apple //e and going on to teach creative coding myself.

The juncture of science and computer science with music, though is an important one. It can make those concepts expressive and immediate.

This video could just be the beginning: the research team, led by France’s Dr. Clément Moulin-Frier, produced it after just a few hours in a code spring, plus the video. So, you could well build on this idea and do something better, given more time. In the meantime, I think it’s already more than reasonably fun.

You’ll find more details on the Poppy forum:
Poppy in a musical setup, please share your ideas

The same team created a Kinect-tracked robotic dance, which is oddly mesmerizing:

More on that effort, by dancer Marie-Aline and researcher/developer Jean-Marc Weber:
Artist residency: Êtres et Numérique

The European Commission has a release on the project in general (here printed in the English-language Prague Post):

Meet Poppy, the printable robot

An overview video covers how the whole rig works:

Poppy humanoid beta Overview from Poppy Project on Vimeo.

Here’s what assembly looks like:

Time lapse of Poppy humanoid's assembly from Poppy Project on Vimeo.

And printing goes something like this, as a hand is produced on a Makerbot Replicator. (Fun trivia: years ago, before founding Makerbot, now-celebrity Bre Pettis was one of the first presenters at CDM’s MusicMakers/Handmade Music event, showing off a cassette tape Mellotron built with Etsy’s Eric Beug. I think it even sort of worked. So, here, things come sort of full circle.)

Poppy's hand being 3Dprinted on a replicator 2 from Poppy Project on Vimeo.

You’re going to need access to a 3D printer, of course, to try this out, but if someone ventures into experimenting with Poppy, we’d love to hear about it.

The post A Toe-Tapping, Dancing 3D-Printed Robot Plays Music appeared first on Create Digital Music.

by Peter Kirn at February 16, 2015 03:38 PM

February 15, 2015

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

Newsletter for February out now - Damien Zammit interview, Pure Data tutorial and more!

Our newsletter for February is now sent to our subscribers. If you have not yet subscribed, you can do that from our start page.

You can also read the latest issue online. In it you will find:

  • 'LMP Asks' interview with Damien Zammit
  • Pure Data tutorial
  • Content wish list progress
  • New software release announcements

and more!

by admin at February 15, 2015 06:24 PM

February 14, 2015

LinuxMuso

February 13, 2015

Create Digital Music » open-source

Put a Radio in Your Modular: Music Thing Radio Music

radiothing

Once upon a time, musicians made music from the sound content pouring invisibly, inaudibly from the air. The likes of John Cage and Kalrheinz Stockhausen turned the radio into stochastic source and instrument, a means of making music in the now.

And now, you can, too, in the latest Eurorack module.

Whether you want a modular or not, this is one module you definitely don’t need. You don’t need to act out Cage-ian fantasies and turn your local hit FM station greatest tracks of the 80s and 90s into an experimental noise performance. Nor do you really need to understand the workings of Eurorack by building your own DIY module. But you can.

And the man who made the DIY project is none other than Tom Whitwell, the one-time music tech blogger who used to trade shots with CDM at Music thing, but has now found a much more enjoyable path making new Eurorack modules (among other worthwhile activities).

Music Thing Modular Radio Music Prototype from Tom Whitwell on Vimeo.

The beginnings of this project can be found in a guest piece Tom wrote for CDM in the heady days of 2012. There, he was already on to the notion of building a radio sequencer – and, in the process, teaching you how to make your own modules.

Now, the piece is fully fleshed out and documented. There are copious instructions, so that this might even be your first electronics piece. You can delve into the history of the music that inspired it, then grab a soldering iron and start making your own history.

It’s open source hardware, with extensive documentation and all the circuits and faceplate up on GitHub:

https://github.com/TomWhitwell/RadioMusic

More background on the music history behind this:
Compositions based on radio broadcasts

And the sounds you can make actually do get really interesting, as you start to modulate the radio sequencer’s output via voltage:

Manic Burroughs Cut-Up is Manic from thonk on Vimeo.

There’s no actual radio here. It’s a sequenced sampler, technically. The advantage, though, is future-proofing – much needed as terrestrial (analog) radio goes the way of the dodo, to be replaced by digital radio and its ilk. But the concept holds. And this is a nice project if you’re interested in dabbling in DIY for Eurorack.

Find it at Music thing Modular:
Music thing Modular

If you do want a radio in your rack, here are a couple of suggestions (via our friend Guy Taylor):

ADDAC System VC FM Radio
Evaton RF Nomad

And they’re also worthy additions, I think. (That ADDAC is handsome.)

ADDAC102_big_

Previously (including notes if you want an actual radio):
Music Thing: A Radio Sequencer, How to Get Into DIY Synth Modules, How to Have Fun

radiothing2

The post Put a Radio in Your Modular: Music Thing Radio Music appeared first on Create Digital Music.

by Peter Kirn at February 13, 2015 04:52 PM

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

Demystifying JACK – A Beginners Guide to Getting Started with JACK

JACK is the de-facto standard audio server for working with professional audio on Linux. JACK, the name of which is a recursive acronym for ‘JACK Audio Connection Kit’, is a very powerful piece of software. Some new users find it confusing at first. While its settings and functionality are extensive, you only need to know the basics to get started and take advantage of its underlying power.

by Conor at February 13, 2015 10:20 AM

February 12, 2015

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

LMP content wish list progress

Due to progress made on tutorials, we've recently been able to tick off a few tasks from the content wish list. We would like to now ask the LMP community for more suggestions of what content you would like to see on the website. If you have any suggestions, feel free to add them in the comments section of the content wish list.

by Conor at February 12, 2015 10:06 PM

Rakarrack LV2 plugin ports - Work in Progress

Spencer Jackson has taken on the task of porting some of the effects modules from Rakarrack to LV2 plugins. So far Spencer has completed the following modules -

by Conor at February 12, 2015 09:56 PM

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] CfP ICAD 2015 - Deadline EXTENDED to Sunday March 1, 2015

From: Visda Goudarzi <visda@...>
Subject: [LAA] CfP ICAD 2015 - Deadline EXTENDED to Sunday March 1, 2015
Date: Feb 12, 1:09 pm 2015

Deadline for Submission of Papers, Posters, Music, and Installations EXTENDED to Sunday March 1st,
2015.

Please note that the deadline for Extended Abstracts will not be extended.

http://icad15.iem.at



The 21st International Conference on Auditory Display

July 6 - 7 Workshops and Student Think Tank

July 8 - 10 Conference

University of Music and Performing Arts and Technical University of Graz, Austria.

::::::::::::::::: KEY DATES :::::::::::::::::

01 March 2015 Submission of Papers, Posters, Music, and Installations

15 March 2015 Submission of Workshops

15 April 2015 Submission of Extended Abstracts

15 April 2015 Notification of acceptance for Workshops

01 May 2015 Notification of acceptance for Papers, Posters, Music, and Installations

15 May 2015 Notification of acceptance for Extended Abstracts

01 June 2015 Camera-Ready deadline

::::::::::::::::: AREAS OF INTEREST :::::::::::::::::

Relevant areas for ICAD include but are not limited to:

Auditory Display:

- Aesthetics, Culture, & Philosophy

- Design, Theory & Methods

- Technology: Tools & Applications

- Perceptual and Cognitive Aspects

- Usability & Evaluation

- Accessibility

Special Focus of ICAD15:

- Sonification:

- Exploration of Data through Sound

- Sonification as Art

- Sonic Interaction Design

- Interaction design

- Input technologies

- Auditory Information Design

- Spatial Audio

- Binaural virtual acoustics

- Loudspeaker-based sound field synthesis



Accepted papers will be included in the published proceedings and made publicly available in the
Georgia Tech SMARTech system (http:// smartech.gatech.edu/). The types of submissions solicited for
ICAD15 include:

::::::::::::::::: PAPERS AND POSTERS:::::::::::::::::

Paper and poster submissions will be 4-8 pages in length, including all figures and references. Typical
paper contributions are between 6 - 8 pages, and typical poster contributions are 4 - 5 pages long. Full
papers should describe work that offers a substantial contribution to the field of auditory display.
Authors of accepted papers will be invited to give an oral presentation of their work, and at least one
author must present the work at the conference for the paper to appear in the proceedings. Poster
submissions should describe both finished work and work in late stages of progress. Work that is
complete enough that meaningful conclusions can be drawn at the time of submission are encouraged.
Authors of accepted submissions will be invited to participate in a poster and/or demonstration session,
and at least one author must present the work at the conference for the paper to appear in the
published proceedings. When weighing the decision to submit to poster and demonstration sessions, we
encourage authors [message continues]

read more

February 12, 2015 02:00 PM

[LAA] [LAD] [LAU] Guitarix 0.32.3 release

From: Hermann Meyer <brummer-@...>
Subject: [LAA] [LAD] [LAU] Guitarix 0.32.3 release
Date: Feb 12, 1:08 pm 2015

Release 0.32.3 is out,

Guitarix is a tube amplifier simulation for
jack (Linux), with an additional mono and a stereo effect rack.
Guitarix includes a large list of plugins[*] and support LADSPA / LV2
plugs as well.

The guitarix engine is designed for LIVE usage, and feature ultra fast,
glitch and click free, preset switching and is full Midi (learn)
and remote (Web-interface/ GUI) controllable (bluez / avahi)

Changelog:

* fix some rc-style bugs for KDE Qtcurve engine
* add 2 new rc-styles (flat and green)
* replace old outdated factory presets
* add some new plugin presets
* add jack midi out port to report state (CC messages) and control
multiple instances with one interface
* set engine.mute to default midi controller 120 (All Sounds Off)
* add new command-line options -L start with Live Play GUI
and -M start with engine muted
* fix some issues with remote control GUI and external plugs

Guitarix is free, open-source software, distributed under the terms of
the GNU General Public License (GPL) version 2 or later.

Please refer to our project page for more information:
http://guitarix.sourceforge.net/

Download Site:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/guitarix/

regards
hermann
_______________________________________________
_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-announce mailing list
Linux-audio-announce@lists.linuxaudio.org
http://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-announce

read more

February 12, 2015 02:00 PM

[LAA] OpenMusic 6.9 - new build for Ubuntu (.deb) and Fedora (.rpm)

From: <anders.vinjar@...>
Subject: [LAA] OpenMusic 6.9 - new build for Ubuntu (.deb) and Fedora (.rpm)
Date: Feb 12, 1:08 pm 2015

New builds available at: https://forge.ircam.fr/p/OM/downloads/

OpenMusic homepage: http://repmus.ircam.fr/openmusic/home

Main news:

- new package scripts for RPM and DEB, to take care of necessary
(32-bit) dependencies for OM. (OM is still 32-bit only from lack of
access to 64-bit lw-compiler.)

- the music-fonts OM uses (omfonts) get installed as part of the main
package, ie. the extra package is no longer needed

- a non-standard dependency: libsdif.so ("SDIF: Sound Description
Interchange Format" - http://sdif.sourceforge.net/) - is provided as
RPM- and DEB-packages at the download site

Other news:

- PortMidi handles midi i/o, using the same code on all 3 supported
platforms (Linux, OSX, Windows)

- fluidsynth is no longer part of the OM-application, instead users are
expected to connect to their preferred MIDI-synth to play back MIDI
from OM

- various new features and bug-fixes

Packages are checked on Fedora 20+21, and Ubuntu 14.04.1.

Thanks for all bug-reports.

-anders
_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-announce mailing list
Linux-audio-announce@lists.linuxaudio.org
http://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-announce

read more

February 12, 2015 02:00 PM

Hackaday » digital audio hacks

Clocked 8-Bit Random Pattern Generator For a CMOS Synth

A random noise generator is pretty handy when working with music, and building one using a micro-controller can be pretty trivial. So it’s nice when someone comes along and builds it from a few analog and digital parts. [acidbourbon] built his Clocked 8-BIT Random Pattern Generator for  CMOS Synth  inspired and motivated by the recent article Logic Noise: Sweet, Sweet Oscillator Sounds by [Elliot Williams]. It’s 8-bit output can be used as a random sequencer for DIY CMOS synths.
This pattern generator is suited to to be used in combination with a 4051 8-channel analog multiplexer. But it sounds quite interesting on it’s own (best enjoyed in stereo, check out the video after the break). After building some CMOS synth circuits, [acidbourbon] moved on to make some sequencers and multiplexers which then let him to devise this random pattern generator which could be gated using a clock signal.

The basic principle is straight forward – generate noise, amplify it, apply a clock to get the gated noise output. His design choices for the various sections are well explained, based on constraints that he had to work with. Everything needs to work at 5V, but his noise generator circuit requires 12V to work. He choose to use a charge pump to generate -5V, resulting in a 10V supply, which was barely enough, but worked. A boost regulator might probably have served better to generate 12V, but maybe he already had the ICL7660 charge pump IC lying around in his parts bin. The rest of the circuit uses standard CMOS/TTL devices, and [acidbourbon] provides all of the design files for what looks like a neat, single sided PCB that can easily be made using the toner-transfer method.

Video below.


Filed under: digital audio hacks, musical hacks

by Anool Mahidharia at February 12, 2015 02:00 AM

February 11, 2015

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

ArtyFX demo and Fabla 2.0 update from OpenAV

OpenAV have created a video showcasing some of their ArtyFX plugins working on a MOD Quadra. They have been demonstrating the MOD Quadra at open-mic nights and we can expect more video demos soon.

by Conor at February 11, 2015 11:03 AM

February 10, 2015

OpenAV

MOD meets the Open Mic night

MOD meets the Open Mic night

Here at OpenAV we have a MOD Quadra : and we’re taking it to a local open-mic night every week. We’ve seen smiles on musicians faces when they first see the power of MOD, we’ve had compliments on the sound quality, and this week we’ll do it all again! Stay tuned – more MOD demos with OpenAV software coming up! Fabla2… Read more →

by harry at February 10, 2015 11:03 PM

February 06, 2015

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

LMP Asks #5: An interview with Damien Zammit

This month we talked to Damien Zammit. As well as being the developer of zam-plugins, he has also contributed to the coreboot project, Calf studio plugins and Linux drivers for various audio interfaces. He maintains his own website over at ZamAudio.com.

by Conor at February 06, 2015 08:52 AM

February 05, 2015

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

Yoshimi 1.3.2 released

Yoshimi 1.3.2 is now available. The main feature of this release is the consolidation and completion of changes to root directories, banks and instruments along with MIDI control of these.

This release also includes:

  • LV2 updates
  • GUI sync and error check improvements
  • Instrument name ambiguities resolved
  • Obligatory bug fixes

For full details, see the annoucement on the Linux Audio users mailing list.

by Conor at February 05, 2015 09:00 PM

February 04, 2015

Hackaday » digital audio hacks

Logic Noise: Sweet, Sweet Oscillator Sounds

Welcome to part one of a series taking you down the rabbit hole of DIY electronic synthesizers based on (largely) CMOS logic chips. Instead of synths being commodity gear made by large corporate enterprises, we’ll be building with the cheapest available parts, using and misusing digital logic. In short, don’t expect pre-packaged smooth tones, because we’ll be making creative noise machines.

If you’re the chiptunes type, you’ll probably find something you like here. If you’re the circuit bender or electro-noise-punk type, this is gonna be right up your alley. If you just like to see CMOS chips wriggle and squirm in unintended ways, feel free to look over my shoulder. If you’re the type who insists that a screwdriver can’t be used to pry open a paint can, then maybe you’d better move along. There’s a thin line between the glitch as bug and the glitch as interesting discovery, and we’ll be dancing all over it.

To give you a taste of what we’re up to this session, here is a quick demo.  Have a look and then we’ll get down to it.

It All Starts With Squares

single-oscillator-breadboardWe’ll start off with one oscillator (yawn!) and then turn it into something much more interesting really quickly. Making this circuit playable takes a little more experimentation, but that’s the whole point. And along the way, we’ll be laying the groundwork for much more complicated circuits later on. We’re starting at the beginning, but the curve is steep.

Our simple oscillator circuit is based around a logic inverter. An inverter is a chip that outputs the opposite logical voltage level from what’s put in: if the input sees the high voltage level, it sets the output low (and vice-versa).

To see how to make a quick and dirty oscillator out of an inverter, think about what would happen if you connected an inverter’s output back into its input. If the input starts off low, the output goes high. But since they’re connected, the input is now pulled high which in turn sets the output to low, and we’re back where we started. This high-low-high-low feedback circuit gives us a basic oscillator, only there’s a couple more nuances we’ll need to look into.

40106_pinoutThe chip we’ll be using for our oscillator is the CD40106BE; also called the HEF40106, depending on who makes it (datasheet, PDF) which is a hex inverter with hysteresis. It’s a great chip for our purposes because it’ll work on a wide voltage range so that we don’t have to stress about powering it. 5V is a good minimum, but 9V batteries are no problem and 12V is just peachy. Hex just means that there are six inverters in the same chip. You can see how they’re laid out below. Pin 1 is the input of the first inverter. Pin 2 is its output, and so on.

Hysteresis is just Greek for: state dependence. In our particular case, it means that the threshold value that the chip uses to determine whether the input is high or low depends on whether it’s currently high or low. The 40106 chip has two threshold values: a lower value that’s active when the input is already high and a higher value that’s used when the input is low. For the traditional use, this provides a degree of noise immunity; if the input is currently high, but fluctuating around a bit, it has to drop lower than the lower threshold to change state.

hysteresis

 

Here, we rely on hysteresis to make our oscillator run. If you substituted an inverter without hysteresis, its output would sit at the (single) voltage threshold. Why? When the output voltage gets a tiny bit above the threshold, it pulls the input up with it, and it switches the output low. When the output goes a tiny bit below the threshold, it switches back the other way. Instead of an oscillator, you end up with the chip thrashing back and forth internally just to hold a constant middle voltage level on the output.

If you add hysteresis into the mix, you get an oscillator. Instead of wiggling imperceptibly around one switching threshold, we have two thresholds. This means that the chip won’t switch its output low until the input rises at least up to the higher input level. Now, that happens pretty fast: when I build the circuit with straight feedback, I get a square wave that oscillates at 4.3 MHz, a few orders of magnitude too fast for human hearing. We need to slow the feedback down.

To lower the pitch down into the audio range, we run the feedback through a resistor to limit the current in the feedback path, and then charge up a capacitor with this current. The time it takes the capacitor to charge up from the lower threshold voltage to the upper depends on the current that it’s supplied. That means that the frequency is determined by the size of the resistor and the capacitor. A larger resistance limits the current, slowing the cycle down. A larger capacitor requires more charge in order to reach a given voltage, which also results in a slower cycle and thus lower pitch.

40106_just_osc

 

So look over the oscillator circuit for a second and we’ll recap. Imagine that the input voltage just crossed the lower threshold. Because the input voltage is low, the output is set high. The high output and low input causes current to flow through the resistor which slowly charges up the capacitor until the input voltage is higher than the high threshold, when the logic switches state and the output goes low. The low output then slowly discharges the capacitor until it drops below the low threshold and the cycle repeats. Tadaa! A square wave on the output bouncing between the two logic voltage levels.

But what about the input? Remember that the input sees the capacitor charging and discharging between the two threshold levels. Because the output voltage is constant and the voltage on the capacitor is increasing over time, the current that flows through the resistor drops a little during the cycle, so what we get is a “triangle” wave that’s made out of exponential curves rather than straight lines. (Good enough for gov’t work.) We’ll use this “triangle” waveform in a couple of weeks when we move on to linear-mode logic chip abuse, so just keep it in the back of your head for now. In the mean time, a scope trace is worth a thousand words.

cmos_40106_square_trace

Here in yellow is the inverter’s output; a nice 5V square wave at 321 Hz. The green trace is the input, which shows the slowed-down charging and discharging of the capacitor. You can also see just exactly where the inverter’s lower and upper threshold values are, marked off by the dashed lines. As soon as the voltage on the capacitor reaches the relevant threshold voltage, the output switches state. And that’s the essence of the “relaxation oscillator” — it’s a simple feedback oscillator that takes advantage of the inverter’s hysteresis and is slowed down by charging up a capacitor.

And here’s what it sounds like. I used a potentiometer for the resistor, and I’m twisting the knob during the demo.

Build It

trimpot-oscillator-testsEnough theory. It’s time for you to build yours.

To actually hear this thing, we’ll also need to connect it to an amplifier and speaker. I recommend the cheapest powered “computer” speakers you can find because they have built-in amplification with volume control and you won’t really care if you break them. I’ve even cut off the normal 1/4″ plug on the end of mine and soldered on alligator clips to make them easier to attach to breadboarded circuits.

If you’re going to connect DIY noisemakers up to something valuable, you’re going to want to reduce the output down to line levels: let’s say one volt peak-to-peak. If you’re running on a 9V battery, that means dividing down by a factor of nine-ish. You can do this with a simple voltage divider (see below).
Finally, there’s two details that you almost always have to think about with CMOS chips. First, they make spikey demands on the power supply as the internal transistors are switching. To smooth this out, I usually add a 0.1 uF or 1 uF capacitor just across the chip’s power pins. Second, the unused inputs should ideally be connected to ground (or VCC, your choice). That means grounding pins 3, 5, 9 11, and 13. And don’t forget to hook up power to pins 7 and 14.

A practical circuit would look something like this:

40106_osc_power

Fire up your speakers / amp and give it a listen until you can’t take it anymore. For me that took about five seconds. (For my wife, about three.) Let’s see how quickly we can add a little pitch control and dynamics to make things more musical.

Pitch

First let’s work on changing the pitch up. The frequency is determined by how quickly the capacitor is filled up through the resistor, so we’ve got to change one or the other. Changing the capacitance is hard, so we’ll work on the resistor. Any way that you can put a variable resistance in this circuit is fair game. A potentiometer, as above, is pretty obvious.

A light-dependent-resistor photocell is a great option. You can then use light to control the pitch by waving your hands around, which is kinda cool. But it gets much cooler when you invite the LEDs over — anything that you’ve got that can turn on and off an LED can change the pitch of your oscillator. If you’ve been racking your brain about how you’re going to hook your Arduino up to this circuit: PWM to get different brightnesses and “control” the pitch.

And then there’s DIY resistors. Some old VHS tapes have a nice resistance that increases linearly across their length, but you may have to try a few before you find the right brand. (A really thick layer of graphite laid down by a dark pencil works just about as well.) Test the matte side of a bunch of tapes with an ohmmeter first before you go ripping them out of the cassettes. My copy of “12 Monkeys” has 37 KOhms per inch, which is pretty much ideal using a slightly smaller capacitor. I’ve taped the VHS tape down to a piece of cardboard and connected it to the circuit with alligator clips. I play it by tapping on the tape with another clip. Good vibrations!

Originalstylophone” by Dhscommtech CC BY-SA 3.0

If you want multiple discrete notes, like a piano, you can connect a variety of resistors with one end connected in common to the capacitor. On the other end, connecting back to the output, you attach a wire that you use to select which resistor is in the circuit. See the stylophone for inspiration.

If your DIY resistor doesn’t have the same range as mine, or you just want to play different pitches, you can use whatever size capacitor you need to get the range you want, naturally. The chips don’t like to put out more than a couple of milliamps, so try to keep the minimum resistance above 2 KOhms if you want the chip to run in spec.

With the 0.1 uF capacitor that I’ve chosen 10K Ohms is a good lower limit for the resistance, otherwise the pitches get annoyingly high. Because of this, you might want to toss a 10K resistor in series with whatever variable resistance scheme you’re using. Otherwise, you’ll end up annoying the dog or disrupting bats’ flight paths.

Dynamics

If you’d just like to turn this thing on and off, we’ve got a few options. Easiest is to wire the VCC power supply through a pushbutton. Press the button, the chip gets juice and makes noise. Release, no power and silence. A quick way to improve on this circuit is to add a fairly large (10uF to 100uF) capacitor just after the switch. When you release the button, the capacitor will provide enough charge to run the circuit for a little while, smoothing out the release of the note.

Otherwise you can lean on the LDRs again, and make yourself a light-dependent volume control by adding an LDR to the voltage divider that I suggested above to get the signal down to line levels. Ping this LDR with an LED, and again you’ve got electronic control over the volume. We’ll do volume control more seriously in a few weeks, but for now you can cobble something together with an LDR if you really need one now.

If you’re building along, now is a good time to test some of this out on the breadboard, and maybe try to play a simple melody or whatever. At least try the button in the power supply trick, and try experimenting with different power-fade-out capacitor sizes. Once your familiar with one oscillator, we’ll throw in another.

Timbral Modulation

Now it starts to get interesting. (Oh, this is just the beginning!) We’ve got five inverter gates still unused, any of which could be used to add richness / modify the simple square wave we’re putting out so far. So let’s make an oscillator sync effect. If we build up another oscillator and use it to turn on and off our first oscillator and set things up just right, we’ll get the sometimes nasal, sometimes biting timbres of digital hard sync.

 

40106_sync_osc

Build up a second oscillator just like the first, and connect the second’s output to the input of the first oscillator through a diode and an approximately 1 KOhm resistor. (The resistor limits the output current to keep the chip in spec.) When the second oscillator is high, it will conduct through the diode and keep the input on oscillator one always high, effectively turning it off. But when the second oscillator goes low, it will release oscillator one to do its normal thing.

The frequency of the first (fast) oscillator acts as a timbre modulator, and the second oscillator controls the overall perceived pitch. Let’s take it to the scope.

cmos_40106_gated_traces

The green trace on top is the second oscillator, set to the frequency that determines the pitch. It’s a boring square wave. But the yellow trace on the bottom is the synced, higher frequency trace that we use as output. You can see that when the green oscillator goes high, it conducts through the diode and forces the input of the yellow oscillator high, and correspondingly its output low. When the green oscillator output goes low, the yellow oscillator is free to do its thing again; the diode only conducts one way. So we see the yellow oscillator start back up at its higher frequency until it gets cut off in mid-cycle by the green oscillator going high again.

This circuit sounds a lot more interesting than the initial boring old square waves, and it’s even more expressive when you can change the frequency of the synced oscillator. A potentiometer is OK, but here’s a great place to use an LDR to give you control over the timbre by waving your hand around over the photocell. The one caveat is that when the frequency of the synced oscillator approaches that of the syncing oscillator, you don’t get any sound anymore. So to play around, it makes a lot of sense to put the LDR in series with a potentiometer so that you can play with the range of the effect.

For extra credit, drive the synced oscillator’s frequency by pointing an LED at the LDR. Now however you control the LED will control the high-frequency component of the timbre. How close you get the LED to the LDR changes the depth of the effect, from subtle to really nuts. The pitch is still controlled with the potentiometer you’ve got running oscillator two, but the timbre is controlled by the LED. Of course, nothing stops you from applying the same trick to the pitch oscillator either.

Conclusion, and Next Week: Sequencers

So by now you’ve got something built up on your desk that’s either making completely autonomous noise with blinking LEDs, or you’ve built an expressive manual electronic instrument. If you get anything good, record it and link to it in the comments section. (And let us know how you did it.)

Next week we’ll add a sequencer to the basic relaxation oscillator framework here, so stay tuned. And if you’d like to pre-order yourself some parts, we’ll need a 4040 counter chip and (my favorite CMOS logic chip in the world?) a 4051 8-way analog switch. You’ll also want an assortment of resistors, probably an LDR or two, and a bunch of diodes on hand. And if you haven’t got those cheap powered computer speakers sorted out yet, get on it.

See you then.


Filed under: digital audio hacks, Featured, slider

by Elliot Williams at February 04, 2015 03:01 PM

SnoTunes Lets You Rock Out in the Winter

[Matt Bilsky], an avid reader of Hackaday for years, finally gathered up the courage to submit a project to us. We swear, we don’t byte! Anyway — we’re glad he did, because his project is absolutely awesome. He calls it SnoTunes and it’s a backpack stereo system designed for the outdoors.

It’s a whopping 160 watt stereo, has 7-8 hours of battery life, is somewhat water resistant, and can be controlled wirelessly. Its brain is a Raspberry Pi B+ running Kodi (which was formerly XBMC). A 7″ display is hidden inside of the backpack for more fine tuning controls.

It fetches and downloads YouTube music videos and can create a playlist that can be manipulated by text message. You can share YouTube links to have it download and queue the songs, you can skip the songs (but only if four people make the request), and it even automatically parses the music video titles to extract the song name and band. It also works with AirPlay — but who even uses that.

He’s got a bunch of videos explaining the build and has tons of resources on his personal website in case you want to try your hand at building one. We’ve seen lots of portable home brew stereos before, but never in a backpack!

 


Filed under: digital audio hacks

by James Hobson at February 04, 2015 06:00 AM

February 03, 2015

Recent changes to blog

Guitarix 0.32.3 release

Release 0.32.3 is out,

Guitarix is a tube amplifier simulation for
jack (Linux), with an additional mono and a stereo effect rack.
Guitarix includes a large list of plugins[*] and support LADSPA / LV2 plugs as well.

guitarix

The guitarix engine is designed for LIVE usage, and feature ultra fast, glitch and click free, preset switching and is full Midi (learn)
and remote (Web-interface/ GUI) controllable (bluez / avahi)

Changelog:

  • fix some rc-style bugs for KDE Qtcurve engine
  • add 2 new rc-styles (flat and green)
  • replace old outdated factory presets
  • add some new plugin presets
  • add jack midi out port to report state (CC messages) and control
    multiple instances with one interface
  • set engine.mute to default midi controller 120 (All Sounds Off)
  • add new command-line options -L start with Live Play GUI
    and -M start with engine muted
  • fix some issues with remote control GUI and external plugs

Guitarix is free, open-source software, distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL) version 2 or later.

Please refer to our project page for more information:
http://guitarix.sourceforge.net/

Download Site:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/guitarix/

regards
hermann

by brummer at February 03, 2015 02:37 PM

February 02, 2015

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] yoshimi 1.3.2 released

From: Will Godfrey <willgodfrey@...>
Subject: [LAA] yoshimi 1.3.2 released
Date: Feb 2, 3:48 pm 2015


The main feature of this release is the consolidation and completion of changes
to root directories, banks and instruments along with MIDI control of these.

Also:
LV2 updates
GUI sync and error check improvements
Instrrment name ambiguities resolved
Obligatory bug fixes

http://sourceforge.net/projects/yoshimi/?source=directory

--
Will J Godfrey
http://www.musically.me.uk
Say you have a poem and I have a tune.
Exchange them and we can both have a poem, a tune, and a song.
_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-announce mailing list
Linux-audio-announce@lists.linuxaudio.org
http://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-announce

read more

February 02, 2015 04:00 PM

January 31, 2015

aubio

vamp-aubio-plugins 0.5.0

A new version of the vamp-aubio-plugins is now available for download. Originally created by Chris Cannam, the set of Vamp plugins for aubio have recently been updated with three new plugins:

  • Aubio Mel-frequency Band Energy Detector
    • Low Level Features
    • Computes Energy in each Mel-Frequency Bands.
  • Aubio Mfcc Detector
    • Low Level Features
    • Computes Mel-Frequency Cepstrum Coefficients.
  • Aubio Spectral Descriptor
    • Low Level Features
    • Computes spectral descriptor.

Additionally, two new outputs have been added to the Onset detection plug-in: the output of the onset detection function before and after peak-picking.

More information is available at the new vamp-aubio-plugins home page.

vamp-aubio-plugins 0.5.0 source

Binary for Linux amd64

Binary for Mac OS X

Binary for Windows

January 31, 2015 04:52 PM

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] Linux Audio Conference 2015 - Extension of Deadline

From: Frank Neumann <beachnase@...>
Subject: [LAA] Linux Audio Conference 2015 - Extension of Deadline
Date: Jan 31, 12:22 pm 2015


[Sorry for cross-posting, please distribute.]

The Linux Audio Conference submissions deadline has been extended for
another week! Please note the new deadline:

Sunday, Feb 8th, 2015 (23:59 HAST)

So, if you were considering to submit a paper but couldn't make up your
mind yet, here is your chance to become active! Never forget that this
conference lives through the people participating in it.

February 8th is the new deadline for all submission types: papers,
music, installations, workshop proposals.

Check out the link below for more info:
http://lac.linuxaudio.org/2015/participation

Note that as usual we have created two different OpenConf instances: one
for the submission of regular papers, lightning talks and poster
sessions, and a second one for music, installations and workshop
proposals. For the latter, please also check the detailed instructions
at http://lac.linuxaudio.org/2015/download/lac2015-call-for-miw.pdf.

If you have any questions concerning your submission, please don't
hesitate to contact us at lac@linuxaudio.org, or through our #lac2015
IRC channel on freenode.net.

Please spread this information to anyone who might be interested.

We look forward to your submissions and hope to meet you in Mainz in
April!

Sincerely,
The LAC 2015 Organizing Team
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January 31, 2015 01:00 PM

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

Linux Audio Conference submissions deadline extended

The Linux Audio Conference submissions deadline has been extended for another week! The new deadline is Sunday, Feb 8th, 2015 (23:59 HAST) This is the new deadline for all submission types: papers, music, installations, workshop proposals.

So, if you were considering to submit a paper but couldn't make up your mind yet, here is your chance to become active! Never forget that this conference lives through the people participating in it.

by Conor at January 31, 2015 12:46 PM

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] Qtractor 0.6.5 - The Fermion Ray beta is out!

From: Rui Nuno Capela <rncbc@...>
Subject: [LAA] Qtractor 0.6.5 - The Fermion Ray beta is out!
Date: Jan 31, 10:58 am 2015

Spread the word,

Qtractor 0.6.5 (fermion ray beta) is out!

Release highlights:

* MIDI clip record/overdubbing (NEW)
* Extended track multi-selection for mute/solo (NEW)
* VST-shell sub-plugins support (NEW)
* JACK transport start/stop resilience (FIX)

And still,

Qtractor is an audio/MIDI multi-track sequencer application written
in C++ with the Qt4 framework. Target platform is Linux, where the Jack
Audio Connection Kit (JACK) for audio and the Advanced Linux Sound
Architecture (ALSA) for MIDI are the main infrastructures to evolve as a
fairly-featured Linux desktop audio workstation GUI, specially dedicated
to the personal home-studio.

Website:
http://qtractor.sourceforge.net

Project page:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/qtractor

Downloads:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/qtractor/files

- source tarball:
http://download.sourceforge.net/qtractor/qtractor-0.6.5.tar.gz

- source package (openSUSE 13.2):

http://download.sourceforge.net/qtractor/qtractor-0.6.5-15.rncbc.suse132.src.rpm

- binary packages (openSUSE 13.2):

http://download.sourceforge.net/qtractor/qtractor-0.6.5-15.rncbc.suse132.i586.rpm

http://download.sourceforge.net/qtractor/qtractor-0.6.5-15.rncbc.suse132.x86_84.rpm

- quick start guide & user manual (see also: the wiki):
http://download.sourceforge.net/qtractor/qtractor-0.5.x-user-manual.pdf

- wiki (help really wanted!):
http://sourceforge.net/p/qtractor/wiki/

Weblog (upstream support):
http://www.rncbc.org

License:
Qtractor is free, open-source software, distributed under the terms
of the GNU General Public License (GPL) version 2 or later.

Change-log:
- Connections lines now drawn with anti-aliasing; connections splitter
handles width is now reduced; the MIDI connections splitter pane sizes
are now saved and restored properly.
- Extended multi-selection is now featured on the track-list (main
left-pane), primarily allowing for group mute/solo (and monitor) switching.
- Track-list (left pane) header column widths are now saved and made
persistent across application power cycle (double-click reverts to the
old original default).
- Minor fixes on the MIDI clip event list editor, also making sure the
current event is visible on the piano-roll view.
- As long to prevent asynchronous mistakes to JACK transport state
changes, an internal slack-delay is now introduced after self-initiated
transport commands (eg. start/stop).
- The MIDI clip editor (aka. piano-roll) was missing to clear or reset
the current selection when no shift/ctrl keyboard modifier is in effect.
- VST-shell sub-plugins are now supported (as suggested by abique aka.
Alexandre Bique, thanks).
- MIDI clip record/overdubbing is now possible (Clip/Record on the main
menu or File/Record from the MIDI clip editor.
- Make sure some audio sample file encodings (eg. old Ogg Vorbis) does
not head-start on audio peak generation.


See also:
http://www.rncbc.org/drupal/node/858


Enjoy && have fun.
--
rncbc aka. Rui Nuno Capela
_______________________________________________
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Linux-audio-announce@lists.linuxaudio.org
http://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-announce

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January 31, 2015 11:00 AM

January 30, 2015

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

Calf Studio Gear: New Plug-In - Envelope Filter

A brand new plugin, an envelope filter, has been added to the Calf Studio Gear plugins. This is still a work in progress but is hoped to be included in the up and coming 0.0.60 Calf release.

Features include -

by Conor at January 30, 2015 08:20 PM

AV Linux 2015

Glen MacArthur has just posted some interesting and exciting news about the future of AV Linux. The biggest news is that work has begun on a new development base providing both 64bit and 32bit architectures which will be based on a rolling Debian Testing distribution base.

by Conor at January 30, 2015 07:54 PM

Qtractor 0.6.5 is out!

Rui Nuno Capela has just announced a new release of Qtractor, this time codenamed 'The Fermion Ray'.

Highlights of this release include -

  • MIDI clip record/overdubbing (NEW)
  • Extended track multi-selection for mute/solo (NEW)
  • VST-shell sub-plugins support (NEW)
  • JACK transport start/stop resilience (FIX)

Full details can be found at rncbc.org

by Conor at January 30, 2015 07:36 PM

MusE 2.2.1 released

The MusE developers have just released version 2.2.1.

Fixes and improvements include:

by Conor at January 30, 2015 07:31 PM

rncbc.org

Qtractor 0.6.5 - The Fermion Ray is out!

Spread the word,

Qtractor 0.6.5 (fermion ray beta) is out!

Release highlights:

  • MIDI clip record/overdubbing (NEW)
  • Extended track multi-selection for mute/solo (NEW)
  • VST-shell sub-plugins support (NEW)
  • JACK transport start/stop resilience (FIX)

And still,

Qtractor is an audio/MIDI multi-track sequencer application written in C++ with the Qt4 framework. Target platform is Linux, where the Jack Audio Connection Kit (JACK) for audio and the Advanced Linux Sound Architecture (ALSA) for MIDI are the main infrastructures to evolve as a fairly-featured Linux desktop audio workstation GUI, specially dedicated to the personal home-studio.

Flattr this

Website:

http://qtractor.sourceforge.net

Project page:

http://sourceforge.net/projects/qtractor

Downloads:

License:

Qtractor is free, open-source software, distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL) version 2 or later.

Change-log:

  • Connections lines now drawn with anti-aliasing; connections splitter handles width is now reduced; the MIDI connections splitter pane sizes are now saved and restored properly.
  • Extended multi-selection is now featured on the track-list (main left-pane), primarily allowing for group mute/solo (and monitor) switching.
  • Track-list (left pane) header column widths are now saved and made persistent across application power cycle (double-click reverts to the old original default).
  • Minor fixes on the MIDI clip event list editor, also making sure the current event is visible on the piano-roll view.
  • As long to prevent asynchronous mistakes to JACK transport state changes, an internal slack-delay is now introduced after self-initiated transport commands (eg. start/stop).
  • The MIDI clip editor (aka. piano-roll) was missing to clear or reset the current selection when no shift/ctrl keyboard modifier is in effect.
  • VST-shell sub-plugins are now supported (as suggested by abique aka. Alexandre Bique, thanks).
  • MIDI clip record/overdubbing is now possible (Clip/Record on the main menu or File/Record from the MIDI clip editor.
  • Make sure some audio sample file encodings (eg. old Ogg Vorbis) does not head-start on audio peak generation.

Enjoy && have fun.

by rncbc at January 30, 2015 07:30 PM

January 29, 2015

aubio

Aubio meets R

Martin started a new open source project called Vocobox - a voice controller for digital instruments. He started putting together a human voice dataset that provides multiple short samples of human sung notes in various way (different notes, voyels, etc).

R Logo

R, a free software environment for statistical computing and graphics

For this project, Martin created the R binding to aubio, that will allow you to gather data using aubio command line tools directly from within R.

January 29, 2015 04:51 PM

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] MusE 2.2.1 released

From: Robert Jonsson <spamatica@...>
Subject: [LAA] MusE 2.2.1 released
Date: Jan 29, 7:34 am 2015

MusE 2.2.1 - 2015-01-28

Hi All!

We've just released version 2.2.1 of MusE. To make way for bigger things we
decided to release a minor update with some additions and some bugs fixed.
Have fun!

Fixes and improvements include:
- Optimizations to lv2 rtfifo
- Fix for potential crash on startup due to defaultStyle
- Updated Czech translation from Pavel Fric
- Added explicit link library to simpledrums, didn't appear on some systems
- Added some new keyboard shortcuts, duplicate tracks, edit track name
- Make it possible to mute/solo lots/all of tracks at once

For more information and additional changes see the full changelog at:
https://github.com/muse-sequencer/muse/blob/muse_2_2_1/muse2/ChangeLog

News section:
http://muse-sequencer.org/index.php/News

Download:
http://muse-sequencer.org/index.php/Download

Demos page:
http://muse-sequencer.org/index.php/Demos

Forum:
http://muse-sequencer.org/forum/

Keep on Rocking!
The MusE Team
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Linux-audio-announce@lists.linuxaudio.org
http://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-announce

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January 29, 2015 08:00 AM

[LAA] MMA 15.01 the "Foggy Day in Wynndel" edition

From: Bob van der Poel <bob@...>
Subject: [LAA] MMA 15.01 the "Foggy Day in Wynndel" edition
Date: Jan 29, 7:34 am 2015

A stable release, version 15.01, of MMA--Musical MIDI Accompaniment
is available for downloading. In addition to a number of bug fixes
and optimizations, MMA now features:

- Works with Python 2.7 or 3.x
- Number of minor bug fixes
- TRIGGER function
- STICKY tracks which override grooves
- ORNAMENT enhancements and fixes

Please read the file text/CHANGES-14 for a complete list of changes.

MMA is a accompaniment generator -- it creates midi tracks
for a soloist to perform with. User supplied files contain
pattern selections, chords, and MMA directives. For full details
please visit:

http://www.mellowood.ca/mma/

If you have any questions or comments, please send
them to: bob@mellowood.ca


--
**** Listen to my FREE CD at http://www.mellowood.ca/music/cedars ****
Bob van der Poel ** Wynndel, British Columbia, CANADA **
EMAIL: bob@mellowood.ca
WWW: http://www.mellowood.ca
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Linux-audio-announce@lists.linuxaudio.org
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January 29, 2015 08:00 AM

January 27, 2015

Scores of Beauty

Introducing ScholarLY

It has become a kind of a habit that more involved edition projects that I’m doing with (or as) beautifulScores not only produce beautiful printed results but also improve or extend LilyPond’s capabilities along the way. Take our award-winning edition of the songs of Oskar Fried for example. More or less direct by-products were Janek’s enhancements to shaping curves, Frescobaldi’s new Layout Control Mode and my lilyglyphs LaTeX package. Publicly shared insights about the usefulness of version control for musical work may be considered a surplus in this respect …

Now it seems our crowd engraving project on “Das trunkne Lied” by the very same composer yields even more important results. With ScholarLY I just created a spin-off from our orchestral score’s project directory that may soon become a serious editorial toolkit and make LilyPond an even more indispensable tool for scholarly work.

Entering Annotations

In a recent post I described how I implemented a preliminary interface for annotating musical scores in the LilyPond input files. This relates to an even earlier post where I expressed the desire to edit critical remarks in-place. As a reminder, this is the interface I added to enter annotations in LilyPond’s input files:

  \musicalIssue \with {
    message = "Hairpin missing in OE, taken from bassoons"
  }
  Hairpin
  f2. \> ) |

This annotates the hairpin following the f2. with a “musical issue”, creates a clickable message in the console output and colors the hairpin green. The coloring immediately draws the attention of a reader to the spots that may still need consideration and is therefore a very useful tool already. But there was one fundamental drawback until now: annotations had no notion of their place in the timeline of the score. Having received a jump start through a ready-to-use basic engraver provided by David Nalesnik (thank you!) I managed to overcome this limitation and now annotations know “where” in a score they have been inserted!

There are five annotation commands available, \criticalRemark, \musicalIssue, \lilypondIssue, \question and \todo, plus the generic \annotation that can be turned into a custom annotation type. In fact these annotations can already act as a quite versatile in-score issue tracker – which is a very good thing because in my experience using regular issue trackers such as on GitHub or even the more fluid approach of a “card” type application like Trello are too clumsy to be used efficiently in the context of an edition project. They tend to be used rather sparingly and thus inappropriately. Having the possibility to insert issues directly in the source is a practical approach that can be used with little overhead, and I think it can encourage maintainable workflows complementing version control.

Exporting Annotations

As another major improvement annotations can now be exported to a file instead of only being printed to the console. The implementation is still somewhat rough but it can already be used professionally for our edition project (or adapted to arbitrary projects). So far annotations can be exported to plain text and LaTeX files, but I intend to add support for more file types, e.g. JSON, Markdown or HTML. Eventually this should be template based so it can easily be configured for specific projects.

When I wrote about Using LaTeX for a Musical Edition last year I was quite happy about the usefulness of entering critical remarks as LaTeX commands. These allow for structured input, flexible (re-)formatting and of course beautiful output. And now one of the dreams of that post has come true: the LaTeX input for these critical remarks can now be maintained directly in the LilyPond score! For example, the annotation shown above is rendered to the following LaTeX code:

\musicalIssue
   [author={Urs Liska}]
    {2}{1}
    {Contrabassoon}
    {Hairpin}
    {Hairpin missing in OE, taken from bassoons}

Using LaTeX this now can be typeset beautifully, and – as mentioned in the former post – it can produce different output for proofreading or final publication, simply through setting one switch. This is not fully implemented yet but I’ll soon have a proper initial LaTeX package ready to produce critical reports from LilyPond-generated annotation data! See the same annotation rendered in a structured “draft” layout by LaTeX:

An annotation in draft layout (click to view PDF)

An annotation in draft layout (click to view PDF)

A nice thing about producing such reports with LaTeX is the versatile way such “data” can be processed and rendered. See a sequence of annotations rendered in a compact publication layout:

Some critical remarks in publication layout (click to view PDF)

Some critical remarks in publication layout

Well, this is still rather sketchy but one can already see a few things here:

  • The last annotation is in the same bar as the previous, therefore we don’t repeat the barnumber and print a dash instead
  • The annotation type is only printed when it is not a critical remark
    (actually this doesn’t make much sense because in reality only critical remarks should remain in the report, but I wanted to show the technique)
  • the pp is beautifully printed using a notation font using the lilyglyphs LaTeX package. Not only this but arbitrary LaTeX code can be entered in annotation messages.

Using it in Scholarly Editing

So, why is this cool? Well, the main point of all this is that music and annotations can be edited in one single place – the LilyPond input file. This relieves the author from establishing (and keeping alive) the link between the score and a separate text document mentally. While this may look like just a nice feature I’m convinced this is an actual quantum leap in usability with regard to scholarly editing of scores.

Have a look at the following screenshot from a Frescobaldi session. The Music View on the right hand of the screen shows two differently colored items (green arrow) that immediately tell the reader browsing the score that there is something to consider. Clicking on an item will let the source editor on the left hand side open the input file at the correct location (red arrows) where the annotations can be edited or even removed. At the same time the LilyPond Log on the lower left side has produced a chronological list from all annotations. When looking through all of the annotations this is an even more efficient and reliable approach than looking for colored items in the score. Of course these entries are also clickable and jump to the correct input location at will.

Frescobaldi with annotations in music view, source editor and log viewer (click to enlarge)

Frescobaldi with annotations in music view, source editor and log viewer (click to enlarge)

Now let’s consider the process of proof-reading a scholarly edition. For this I carefully compare the original source(s) with the new engraving until I spot any difference. Now I have to look up if that difference is documented in the critical report, so I note the measure number and locate the corresponding position in the report. With the new annotations it isn’t necessary anymore to switch contexts and work my way through the text document. Instead I can simply navigate within one editing environment, as one can see from the above example. So if I notice a difference between the source edition and the new edition I can easily deal with it without all that tedious, confusing and error-prone context switching I had to deal with until now!

Just as a side note: It may sound trivial but for real-world projects it is also a great improvement that timing information about annotations doesn’t have to be maintained manually in the report document. This is also generated automatically by LilyPond, so I can’t make any errors and don’t have to worry about formatting consistency.

But the improvements already start with the original music entry, and the different annotation types ease the workflow even more. With LilyPond’s new features I can immediately make notes about my observations: when I enter a Slur I can add the “musical issue” annotation right beside it in the input file. And later, when I’m doing a proper critical revision I can change that to a “critical remark” once I’ve decided about the case. This ease of entry and navigation is actually encouraging people to make use of annotations, and you can take our crowd engraving project as an example where we already produced 1,201 annotations by now, just having entered and peer reviewed the instrumental parts of the score, without having even started a proper revision. Maintaining annotations in the input files (with colored output and console messages) also makes it significantly less probable that annotations slip through our attention. When comparing a score with a separate document it is my own responsibility to process each single entry while unprocessed new-style annotations will “pop up” on their own.

Starting With a New Project: ScholarLY

Originally I developed \annotate and its infrastructure in the context of our current edition project, and it has turned out to be a wise decision to use it even when it was only an interface that didn’t do anything yet. If I had waited until the function is ready we wouldn’t have been able to actually use it in the project. And as it stands now the presence of 1,201 annotations has been a very effective motivation to seriously dig into the issue again because otherwise most of that work might have been wasted.

Now that the annotation functionality is in a usable state I created a new project and moved the code into it: ScholarLY. This is a launch I had in mind for quite some time as I hope this will become a serious and powerful toolkit for scholarly editions, and I’m happy that I finally got there. A consistent and comprehensive library with reliable and versatile edition tools will make the natural advantages of LilyPond’s text based approach even more obvious, and I hope it will attract new academic users, institutions and/or publishers to use LilyPond and friends. If you are interested in the project you may have a look at the Wiki which describes what can already be achieved, at the Roadmap document where I collect my ideas and wishes. Or you can of course inspect the actual code. If you obtain the library (by download or git clone?) you can play around with the example document in the examples folder too.

With \annotate I did not create more than the foundation for this project, and the whole “house” will have to be built on top of that. Therefore I encourage everybody who is interested in scholarly editing to join me in that undertaking. Of course I’d be happy about collaborators with skills in LilyPond, Scheme, LaTeX and Python but there is also significant need for discussion about overall strategy and user interface, so don’t hesitate to get in touch even when you don’t think you’ll be able to contribute code. I propose any communication to be done on the lilypond-user mailing list, so if you don’t think you should contact me privately please post something there.

Apart from \annotate there are two more building blocks that will form the foundation of ScholarLY: a well-defined toolbox with smaller helper functions that make scholarly editing simpler with LilyPond, and LaTeX package to typeset reports from the LilyPond-generated annotations. \annotate will be able to use these tools, e.g. for highlighting editorial amendments, adding footnotes or ossias, and there will be other useful tools that scholarly editions may need to prepare their scores and reports.

I’m sure \annotate will once more have a significant influence on the way I conceive scholarly workflows, and I hope this can become a widely used toolkit for others as well. I think this really is something important, not only for its actual value but for its potentials. Maybe the most fundamental aspect to it is not what ScholarLY is able to do but that it shows what can be done with LilyPond in general. Given a vision and people with the right skills it is possible to create tools and workflows for about anything – which is inherent to LilyPond’s text based design.

by Urs Liska at January 27, 2015 10:13 PM

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] [ANN] Radium 3.0.rc3

From: Kjetil Matheussen <k.s.matheussen@...>
Subject: [LAA] [ANN] Radium 3.0.rc3
Date: Jan 27, 8:58 pm 2015

--001a1134cf8e6faf71050d81a534
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8

Radium is a new type of music editor. It is inspired by trackers,
but has fewer limitations and uses graphics to show musical data.

Homepage: http://users.notam02.no/~kjetism/radium/
Screenshots and videos:
http://users.notam02.no/~kjetism/radium/screenshots.php

Source code and 64 bit binary packages are available.


Most important changes in 3.0.rc2 -> 3.0.rc3
=================================
* Fix pd plugin on fedora 21 (and other distributions having wish8.6)
* Fix various crashes related to changing the number of visible lines while
playing
* Use Unicode everywhere. Don't crash if running Radium in a non-ascii path.
* Fix "use last estimated vblank value" button
* Fix clang 3.5 compilation
* Give specific warning if using the Nouveau driver
* Fix memory leaks when loading samples

--001a1134cf8e6faf71050d81a534
Content-Type: text/html; charset=UTF-8
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable


Radium is a new type of music editor. =
It is inspired by trackers,
but has fewer limitations and uses gr=
aphics to show musical data.


Source code and 64 bit bin=
ary packages are available.


Most im=
portant changes in 3.0.rc2 -> 3.0.rc3
=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=
=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=
* Fix pd plugin on fedora 21 (and other distributions havin=
g wish8.6)
* Fix various crashes related to changing the numb=
er of visible lines while playing
* Use Unicode everywhere. Don&#=
39;t crash if running Radium in a non-ascii path.
* Fix "use=
last estimated vblank value" button
* Fix clang 3.5 compila=
tion
* Give specific warning if using the Nouveau driver

v>* Fix memory leaks when loading samples



--001a1134cf8e6faf71050d81a534--

read more

January 27, 2015 09:00 PM

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

Creating a simple synthesizer in Pure Data – Part I

What is the objective of this tutorial?

In this tutorial we're going to make a very simple synthesizer using Pure Data and learn its concepts and workflow along the way. The objective is to get you started with the software in a kind of hands-on approach, doing something relatively useful, relatively quick. If you want in-depth stuff, there are some great sites on the internet. See pd-tutorial.com and the Pure Data FLOSS manual.

by Conor at January 27, 2015 11:17 AM

January 25, 2015

Arch Linux Pro Audio

Interview with CrocoDuck

In the last month here at ArchAudio we learned of CrocoDuck, making music ranging from Neo-Soul to Electronic and Acoustic music. Who is this mysterious duck? We find out in this interview, but first checkout his laid-back funky track Ducky Jam:

Hi CrocoDuck! Who are you, and what are your interests?

I am a physicist crazy in love with science (that I still like to call natural philosophy like 200 years ago), waves, waves propagation, music and Linux. I am attending a master in acoustics right now that cover a broad range of these topics.

Why did you choose Arch as your distro?

Well, It has been a long quest for me. I started with Gentoo linux when I was a teenager with the help of my brother, a software engineer, and I think it is a great distro. But it requires way too much manual work to my taste. I moved to ubuntu – ubuntu studio during the 8 years of high-school and bachelor degree. It is all good but I found myself reinstalling the system every year to keep updated, but also because, after my crazy experiments, my system was kinda unstable. Then I found Arch (ArchBang to be honest) and I think it is a perfect balance. It requires you to go deep in the configuration, which is cool because you take control over your system, and it is very simple to keep your system as clean as possible thanks to the amazing tools you have, pacman first of all.

So the rolling release is a key point for you?

Yep, as it is a rolling distro and you never need to reinstall! I have been running my Arch box continuously for 3 years now and I feel like my computer is responsive and stable as the very first day I installed the system. You have some regression here and there sometimes, but the documentation is so well written and the community so helpful that the solution for any problem one could have it is usually found after some search. I would suggest Arch to anybody who:

  • Wants control over the system
  • Wants the latest software
  • Wants to maintain a system as clean as possible
  • Wants a rolling release
  • Wants to access a huge crazy amount of readily installable software (through repos or AUR)
  • It is willing to take care of the system and keep track of the changes he/she does (that implies that the system will stay stable)

So what tools do you use to make CrocoDuck’s music?

I am an old school guy. I use mostly just Ardour and Guitarix, which I think is getting insanely better at each release cycle. In my opinion, it is way better than any commercial piece of amp modelling software I ever tried. I also like Yoshimi, it is extremely powerful, and Calf plugins are my favourite ones. I also use sometimes some experimental software like fastbreeder and freqtweak. All my drum loops are made with Hydrogen, which is amazingly simple and intuitive to use and Jamin is a must for mastering.

That’s a list of only open source projects. Is that important to you?

The main reason why I use Linux and open source software: the Freedom! Nowadays the market is evolving giving to the consumer readily usable products over which the user have almost no control. Most of the commercial software it is engineered for marketing goals first, for doing its job second. Commercial OSes are more and more intended to mine data out of you than to work good. As a scientist I cannot stand the use of commercial software: it is a black box. You don’t have the source code, then you don’t know how your data are being processed. Science has not been invented to trust companies. I have to use MatLab at uni but I seriously cannot understand why not octave, elmer, scilab, R or root just to name a few. Only open source software gives to you the tools to build a system for yourself, not for other people to make money out of you. For me, Linux (but also any other open source system) is the only thing that turn a product you buy into something that it is really yours and free to be used as you want.

Don’t get me wrong, I don’t think that all the commercial software is bad. Some nice examples are Pianoteq and Renoise, very good pieces of software. Try the demos!

Thanks go to CrocoDuck for taking the time to talk to us here at ArchAudio.org, checkout the CrocoDuck soundcloud page for more music!

by harryhaaren at January 25, 2015 02:49 PM

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

Arturia unveils AudioFuse audio interface, with Linux support

Arturia recently attended the NAMM Show and unveiled AudioFuse, their new audio interface. AudioFuse is a compact USB interface with a plethora of I/O, including two built in mic preamps and ADAT I/O. The unit also has wide compatability, including Linux, and boasts a round-trip latency as low as 3 milliseconds.

by Conor at January 25, 2015 12:12 PM

January 23, 2015

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] Vee One Suite 0.6.0 - A third official beta release!

From: Rui Nuno Capela <rncbc@...>
Subject: [LAA] Vee One Suite 0.6.0 - A third official beta release!
Date: Jan 23, 8:45 pm 2015

Howdy,

Once again, the 'Vee One Suite' of 'old-school' software instruments,
featuring a 'gang of three' made of synthv1 [1] as a polyphonic
synthesizer, samplv1 [2] a polyphonic sampler and drumkv1 [3] as a
drum-kit sampler, are being released into the wild as in so called
'beta' phase.

Changes for this one third beta release are as follows:

- MIDI bank-select/program-changes is now supported, for patch, preset
and/or instrument program control.
- New Help/Configure dialog is introduced for editing the also new MIDI
bank/programs interface and user preference options as well (new home of
the old Help/Use native dialogs option).
- Presets may now be specified by base name, as an alternative to the
complete preset file-path on command line argument (re. stand-alone JACK
client).
- Fixed parameters A/B comparison swap.

As usual, all made available in dual form:

- a pure stand-alone JACK [4] client with JACK-session, NSM [5] (Non
Session management) and both JACK MIDI and ALSA [6] MIDI input support;
- a LV2 [7] instrument plug-in.

The Vee One Suite are free and open-source Linux Audio software,
distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL) [8]
version 2 or later.

Details are dumped below, business as usual ;)


* synthv1 - an old-school polyphonic synthesizer [1] *

synthv1 0.6.0 (third official beta) has been released!

synthv1 is an old-school all-digital 4-oscillator subtractive
polyphonic synthesizer with stereo fx.

LV2 URI: http://synthv1.sourceforge.net/lv2

website:
http://synthv1.sourceforge.net
downloads:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/synthv1/files
- source tarball:
http://download.sourceforge.net/synthv1/synthv1-0.6.0.tar.gz
- source package:

http://download.sourceforge.net/synthv1/synthv1-0.6.0-19.rncbc.suse132.src.rpm
- binary packages:

http://download.sourceforge.net/synthv1/synthv1-0.6.0-19.rncbc.suse132.i586.rpm

http://download.sourceforge.net/synthv1/synthv1-0.6.0-19.rncbc.suse132.x86_84.rpm


* samplv1 - an old-school polyphonic sampler [2] *

samplv1 0.6.0 (third official beta) has been released!

samplv1 is an old-school polyphonic sampler synthesizer with stereo fx.

LV2 URI: http://samplv1.sourceforge.net/lv2

website:
http://samplv1.sourceforge.net
downloads:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/samplv1/files
- source tarball:
http://download.sourceforge.net/samplv1/samplv1-0.6.0.tar.gz
- source package:

http://download.sourceforge.net/samplv1/samplv1-0.6.0-19.rncbc.suse132.src.rpm
- binary packages:

http://download.sourceforge.net/samplv1/samplv1-0.6.0-19.rncbc.suse132.i586.rpm

http://download.sourceforge.net/samplv1/samplv1-0.6.0-19.rncbc.suse132.x86_84.rpm


* drumkv1 - an old-school drum-kit sampler [3] *

drumkv1 0.6.0 (third official beta) has been released!

drumkv1 is an old-school drum-kit sampler synthesizer with stereo fx.

LV2 URI: http://drumkv1.sourceforge.net/lv2

website:
http://drumkv1.sourceforge.net
downloads:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/drumkv1/files
- source tarball:
http://download.sourceforge.net/drumkv1/drumkv1-0.6.0.tar.gz
- source package:

http://download.sourceforge.net/drumkv1/drumkv1-0.6.0-15.rncbc.suse132.src.rpm
- binary packages:

http://download.sourceforge.net/drumkv1/drumkv1-0.6.0-15.rncbc.suse132.i586.rpm

http://download.sourceforge.net/drumkv1/drumkv1-0.6.0-15.rncbc.suse132.x86_84.rpm

message continues]

read more

January 23, 2015 09:00 PM

[LAA] ICAD 2015 - call for submission

From: Visda Goudarzi <visda@...>
Subject: [LAA] ICAD 2015 - call for submission
Date: Jan 23, 8:45 pm 2015


Dear all,

(With apologies for cross posting, please distribute!)

This is a reminder that the call for participation for ICAD15 is currently open. http://icad15.iem.at

Call for Papers, Posters, Extended Abstracts, Music, Installations, and Workshops - ICAD 2015
“ICAD in Space: Interactive Spatial Sonification”

The 21st International Conference on Auditory Display
July 6 - 7 Workshops and Student Think Tank
July 8 - 10 Conference
University of Music and Performing Arts and Technical University of Graz, Austria.

The conference is organised by the Institute of Electronic Music and Acoustics (IEM). IEM is one of the
leading institutions in the field of audio engineering and computer music. As part of the University of
Music and Performing Arts Graz, IEM is a multidisciplinary institution, whose general mission is to bridge
the gap between science and the arts. As a unique characteristic, IEM focuses on sonification as part of
its research in computer music. IEM facilities include laboratories and performance spaces such as CUBE,
which are equipped with spatial audio and motion tracking systems. Since 2014, IEM hosts the Sonic
Interaction Design (SID) lab, in which interactive sound systems are designed and evaluated.

ICAD is a highly interdisciplinary conference with relevance to researchers, practitioners, artists, and
graduate students working with sound to convey and explore information. The conference is unique in
its specific focus on auditory displays and the range of interdisciplinary issues related to their use. Like
its predecessors, ICAD15 will be a single-track conference, open to all, with no membership or affiliation
requirements. In addition to ICAD's core interests, we would like to take the opportunity of the
conference being held at IEM to highlight this yearʼs theme ICAD in Space: Sonification, Sonic Interaction
Design, and Spatial Audio.


::::::::::::::::: KEY DATES :::::::::::::::::

15 February 2015 Submission of Papers, Posters, Music, and Installations
15 March 2015 Submission of Workshops
15 April 2015 Submission of Extended Abstracts
15 April 2015 Notification of acceptance for Workshops
01 May 2015 Notification of acceptance for Papers, Posters, Music, and Installations
15 May 2015 Notification of acceptance for Extended Abstracts
01 June 2015 Camera-Ready deadline

::::::::::::::::: AREAS OF INTEREST :::::::::::::::::

Relevant areas for ICAD include but are not limited to:

Auditory Display:
- Aesthetics, Culture, & Philosophy
- Design, Theory & Methods
- Technology: Tools & Applications
- Perceptual and Cognitive Aspects
- Usability & Evaluation
- Accessibility

Special Focus of ICAD15:
- Sonification:
- Exploration of Data through Sound
- Sonification as Art
- Sonic Interaction Design
- Interaction design
- Input technologies
- Auditory Information Design
- Spatial Audio
- Binaural virtual acoustics
- Loudspeaker-based sound field synthesis

Accepted papers will be included in the published proceedings and made publicly available in the
Georgia Tech SMARTech system (http:// smartech.gatech.edu/). The types of submissions solicited for
ICAD15 include:

::::::::::::::::: PAPERS AND POSTERS:::::::::::::::::

Paper and poster submissions will be 4-8 pages in length, including all figures and references. Typical
paper contributions are between 6 - 8 pages, and typical poster contributions are 4 - 5 pages long. Full
papers should describe work that offers a substantial contribution to the field of auditory display.
Authors of accepted papers will be invited to give an oral prese [message continues]

read more

January 23, 2015 09:00 PM

rncbc.org

Vee One Suite 0.6.0 - A third beta release

Howdy,

Once again, the Vee One Suite of old-school software instruments, featuring a gang of three made of synthv1, as a polyphonic synthesizer, samplv1, a polyphonic sampler and drumkv1, as a drum-kit sampler, are being released into the wild as in so called beta phase.

Changes for this one third beta release are as follows:

  • MIDI bank-select/program-changes is now supported, for patch, preset and/or instrument program control.
  • New Help/Configure dialog is introduced for editing the also new MIDI bank/programs interface and user preference options as well (new home of the old Help/Use native dialogs option).
  • Presets may now be specified by base name, as an alternative to the complete preset file-path on command line argument (re. stand-alone JACK client).
  • Fixed parameters A/B comparison swap.

As usual, all made available in dual form:

  • a pure stand-alone JACK client with JACK-session, NSM (Non Session management) and both JACK MIDI and ALSA MIDI input support;
  • a LV2 instrument plug-in.

The Vee One Suite are free and open-source Linux Audio software, distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL) version 2 or later.

Details are dumped below, business as usual ;)

synthv1 - an old-school polyphonic synthesizer

synthv1 0.6.0 (third official beta) has been released!

synthv1 is an old-school all-digital 4-oscillator subtractive polyphonic synthesizer with stereo fx.

LV2 URI: http://synthv1.sourceforge.net/lv2
website:
http://synthv1.sourceforge.net
downloads:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/synthv1/files

Flattr this

samplv1 - an old-school polyphonic sampler

samplv1 0.6.0 (third official beta) has been released!

samplv1 is an old-school polyphonic sampler synthesizer with stereo fx.

LV2 URI: http://samplv1.sourceforge.net/lv2
website:
http://samplv1.sourceforge.net
downloads:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/samplv1/files

Flattr this

drumkv1 - an old-school drum-kit sampler

drumkv1 0.6.0 (third official beta) has been released!

drumkv1 is an old-school drum-kit sampler synthesizer with stereo fx.

LV2 URI: http://drumkv1.sourceforge.net/lv2
website:
http://drumkv1.sourceforge.net
downloads:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/drumkv1/files

Flattr this

Enjoy && have fun.

by rncbc at January 23, 2015 06:30 PM

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

Guitarix needs your presets!

The Guitarix team are looking to replace the current set of presets in Guitarix with something more up to date. For this, they are looking for users to send them their best presets. They will then choose the best ones out of these submissions to create a new factory preset bank.

by Conor at January 23, 2015 06:13 PM

Vee One Suite sees its third beta release

Rui Nuno Capela has released the third beta, version 0.6.0, of his Vee One Suite. This suite contains 3 plugins -

  • Synthv1 - an old-school polyphonic synthesizer
  • Samplv1 - an old-school polyphonic sampler
  • Drumkv1 - an old-school drum-kit sampler

Changes in this release include -

by Conor at January 23, 2015 06:09 PM

Hackaday » digital audio hacks

DIY USB Stereo Headphone Amplifier

The biggest and best audiophile projects are usually huge tube amps, monstrous speaker cab builds, or something else equally impressive. It doesn’t always have to be that way, though, as [lowderd] demonstrates with a tiny DIY USB DAC build that turns a USB port into a headphone output.

In the Bad Old Days™ putting a DAC on a USB bus would require some rather fancy hardware and a good amount of skill. These days, you can just buy a single chip USB stereo DAC that still has very good specs. [lowderd] used the TI PCM2707 USB DAC, a chip that identifies as a USB Audio Class 1.0 device, so no drivers are needed for it to work in either Windows or OS X.

The circuit fits on a tiny PCB with a USB port on one side, a headphone jack on the other, and the chip and all related components in between. There are some pins on the chip that allow for volume, play/pause. and skip, but these pins were left unconnected for sake of simplicity.

The board was fabbed up at OSH Park, and the second revision of the case laser cut out of bamboo and acrylic by Ponoko. It’s a great looking little box, and something that fits right inside [lowderd]’s headphone case.


Filed under: digital audio hacks

by Brian Benchoff at January 23, 2015 03:00 AM

January 21, 2015

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] [ANN] Radium 3.0.rc1

From: Kjetil Matheussen <k.s.matheussen@...>
Subject: [LAA] [ANN] Radium 3.0.rc1
Date: Jan 21, 9:30 am 2015

--001a11c3561e786877050cf355fe
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8

Radium is a new type of music editor. It is inspired by trackers,
but has fewer limitations and uses graphics to show musical data.

Homepage: http://users.notam02.no/~kjetism/radium/
Screenshots and videos:
http://users.notam02.no/~kjetism/radium/screenshots.php

This time there are also 64 bit binary packages available for download.

Most important changes in 3.0:
=======================
* OpenGL to show graphics.
* Smooth scrolling
* Lots of code rewritten.
* Enhanced graphics and user interface
* Lots of bugs removed and features added.

--001a11c3561e786877050cf355fe
Content-Type: text/html; charset=UTF-8
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Radium is a new type of music editor. It is inspired by tr=
ackers,
but has fewer limitations and uses graphics to show musical data=
.


This time there are also 64 bit binary p=
ackages available for download.

Most important=
changes in 3.0:
=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=
=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D
* OpenGL to show graphics.
* Smooth scrolling
* Lo=
ts of code rewritten.
* Enhanced graphics and user interface
* Lots o=
f bugs removed and features added.



--001a11c3561e786877050cf355fe--

read more

January 21, 2015 10:00 AM

Hackaday » digital audio hacks

Learning Python With Tron Radio

[5 Volt Junkie] has built his share of Arduino projects, but never anything with Python, and certainly never anything with a GUI. After listening to Internet radio one day, a new idea for a project was born: a Raspberry Pi with a small touchscreen display for a UI and displaying soma.fm tracks. It’s finally finished, and it’s a great introduction to Python, Pygame, and driving tiny little displays with the Pi.

Playing soma.fm streams was handled by mpd and mpc, while the task of driving a 2.8″ TFT LCD was handled by the fbtft Linux framebuffer driver. This left [5 Volt Junkie] with the task of creating a GUI, some buttons, and working out how to play a few streams. This meant drawing some buttons in Inkscape, but these were admittedly terrible, so [5 Volt Junkie] gave up and turned on the TV. Tron Legacy was playing, giving him the inspiration to complete his Tron-themed music player.

The result of [5 Volt Junkie]’s work is a few hundred lines of Python with Pygame and a few multicolor skins all wrapped up in a Tron theme. It looks great, it works great, and it’s a great introduction to Python and Pygame.


Filed under: digital audio hacks, Raspberry Pi

by Brian Benchoff at January 21, 2015 12:01 AM

January 18, 2015

OpenAV

Fabla2 : Progress continues…

Fabla2 : Progress continues…

Another few weeks fly by: but there’s also a few weeks of progress to be shown. From small features (panic button) to large features (removal of samples), and some middle size (shiny new dialog boxes!) development continutes at a good pace. With Fabla2 and AVTK development, and preparations for the LAC 2015 there’s a lot happening, and we hope to share… Read more →

by harry at January 18, 2015 10:28 PM

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

Newsletter for January out now - Interview, Drumgizmo Tutorial and Survey Results

Our newsletter for January is now sent to our subscribers. If you have not yet subscribed, you can do that from our start page.

You can also read the latest issue online. In it you will find:

  • First 'LMP Asks' interview of the year, with Spencer Jackson
  • Drumgizmo tutorial
  • LMP Survey results
  • New software release announcements

and more!

by admin at January 18, 2015 10:12 PM

January 17, 2015

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] OSC2MIDI utility, version 0.0.00_beta!

From: Spencer Jackson <ssjackson71@...>
Subject: [LAA] OSC2MIDI utility, version 0.0.00_beta!
Date: Jan 17, 9:10 am 2015

--047d7b62499831d5bf050cba0f32
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8

Hi all:

My project of the last few months is probably ready to set free on some
more machines.

OSC2MIDI is a flexible osc -> midi bridge written in C and designed
especially for control of jack midi apps from an android device. It was
created with the open source android app Control (OSC + MIDI) in mind,
since thats what I use, but was deliberately designed so that one can
specify any arbitrary mapping of messages for conversion with plain text
files. The default mapping works with well with Control but I also have
included maps for adrosc, touchosc, and generic osc messages. Mapping is
(in my opinion) extensively documented in the map file default.omm included
with the source so you can quickly create your own map to suit your own
needs.

Please give it a whirl if you are interested and leave feedback on the
sourceforge project page (discussion for questions, tickets for issues).
I'll let it sit at beta for a bit. Once I clear out any initial bugs (or
miraculously none are found) I'll take off the beta status.

Get it at:
https://sourceforge.net/projects/osc2midi/

Follow the README for installation help, or if stuck, please reach out to
me.

Enjoy!
_ssj71

note: as for the ambitious version number (0.0.00) I see no point in
version numbering before release of a one-man project. :) If it scares you
feel free to rename the folder with a larger number. Once a few bug reports
come in it will grow.

--047d7b62499831d5bf050cba0f32
Content-Type: text/html; charset=UTF-8
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Hi all:

My project of the=
last few months is probably ready to set free on some more machines.

r>
OSC2MIDI is a flexible osc <-> midi bridge written in C and d=
esigned especially for control of jack midi apps from an android device. It=
was created with the open source android app Control (OSC + MIDI) in mind,=
since thats what I use, but was deliberately designed so that one can spec=
ify any arbitrary mapping of messages for conversion with plain text files.=
The default mapping works with well with Control but I also have included =
maps for adrosc, touchosc, and generic osc messages. Mapping is (in my opin=
ion) extensively documented in the map file default.omm included with the s=
ource so you can quickly create your own map to suit your own needs.


>
Please give it a whirl if you are interested and leave feedback on t=
he sourceforge project page (discussion for questions, tickets for issues).=
I'll let it sit at beta for a bit. Once I clear out any initial bugs (=
or miraculously none are found) I'll take off the beta status.

=
/div>
Follow=
the README for installation help, or if stuck, please reach out to me.
=

Enjoy!
_ssj71


iv>note: as for the ambitious version number (0.0.00) I see no point in ver=
sion numbering before release of a one-man project. :) If it scares you fee=
l free to rename the folder with a larger number. Once a few bug reports co=
me in it will grow.


--047d7b62499831d5bf050cba0f32--

read more

January 17, 2015 10:00 AM

January 16, 2015

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

Calf Studio Gear demonstration videos

With the up and coming release of version 0.0.60 of the Calf plugin suite, Markus Schmidt has been posting some videos demonstrating some of the plugins. Check them out!

by Conor at January 16, 2015 11:15 PM

Nothing Special

JACK Midi Control from your Android Phone over WiFi

Since my fundraising for my plugin GUIs is more or less bust, I've been thinking more about making music. I can't really stop developing, cause I'm fairly addicted, but I'm trying to ween myself back to just making whatever I want, rather than trying to develop stuff that will change the world. The world doesn't care that much. Anyhow, this blog is no place for bitterness.

But I have been playing with synths a bit more lately and still am really missing my expression controls. Now I could try to use the old touchmidi app I developed, but it only works with my laptop, and I now have a dedicated desktop in the studio to host my synths so I don't have a touchpad to use. I do have several android devices though. They should be great input interfaces. They can display whatever they like on the screen and have a touch interface so you can have arbitrary configurations of buttons, sliders, knobs, whatever. So I decided to figure out how.



There are a few tools you need, but first: an overview. The key to sending control information from one device to another is OSC (Open Sound Control), which in a nutshell is a way to send data over a network, designed for media applications. We need something to interpret touch input on the phone or tablet and send an OSC message. Then something needs to receive the message, interpret it, convert it to a midi message and send it out a JACK midi port. Well, we aren't inventing the wheel, there are several programs that can do these or related tasks.

One closed source system is TouchOSC. They have a free desktop app and the android app is a few dollars. But its closed source and doesn't actually work on linux. UNACCEPTABLE.
There are really several other apps, many of them free and none of them have had updates in the last few years. Ardroid is an OSC controller, but it is meant for ardour, you can't make custom interfaces like you can with TouchOSC.

What we want is Control. It hasn't been updated for a few years and its kinda buggy, but its OPEN. I could go fix it from the github source (but it would take me a bit of research on android stuff and I'm not a java fan) but its good enough as it is to get by. It uses customizable interface layouts written in JSON and you can add scripting to the interface through javascripts, so no crazy new formats. The real bugs are just in the landscape and portrait mode switching, so I have to open and close the interface a couple times before it gets it right. It's also cross platform.

I was able to make an interface after a few infuriating late night hours of trying to edit one of the examples (that I'm pretty sure had a lot of iOS specific JSON tags), then trying again next morning using the blank template and getting it done in about an hour. I never learn. Its a little involved to make a custom interface but there are good examples and decent documentation. It seems after a while of development the author focused much more on iOS and neglected the Android side, so there are several tags like color that don't work on android and make the interface much buggier if you attempt to use them. If someone wants to be super rad they would take this app and fix it up, make it a bit more robust and report json errors found in layouts etc... But its good enough that I'll just keep using it as it is.

For starters, you can just use the interfaces the app comes with. Go ahead and install it from google play. They have a pretty good variety of interesting interfaces that aren't all exactly conducive to midi control (remember apps CAN have built in OSC support like ardour and non-mixer do) but any of the interfaces built into Control will work. I'll tell you a bit about some other interfaces later.

UPDATE: Since I started writing this, another open source android app has come up: andrOSC. Its much simpler but allows you to edit everything in the app. Its a great option for anyone who wants a custom interface without any sort of file editing or extra uploading. Its a little too simple for what I want so I'm going to stick with Control for now.


Now we just need someplace to send the OSC data that the Control interface will output. Well I thought mididings was the tool for this job but it only accepts a few arbitrary OSC commands and there is no way to change the filtering through OSC aside from making scenes and switching between them. So that was a dead end.

But, the libraries used by mididings are openly available, so I figured I'd just make a python script to do the same thing. Except I've only edited a few python scripts and this is a few steps beyond that. The libraries used are actually c libraries anyway, so c wins. Hold on a sec, I'll just whip up a C program.

(Months go by)

Ah that was quick, right? Wait, Christmas is in how many days?!
Oh well. It works. And its completely configurable (and more features on the way). This gives you the flexibility to change the mapping wherever its easiest, in your OSC client app (i.e. our Control interface), in the osc2midi converter map file, or in the midi of the target program. In another post I'll describe how to use osc2midi more fully (with custom mappings) for now the default one works (because I wrote it to work with all the example interfaces that come with Control).

Download a snapshot, (EDIT: I just released the first beta, from now on, download the files) extract them, and install them:
cd osc2midi
cd build
cmake ..
make
sudo make install

Then run:
osc2midi


Not too bad (if it didn't work cmake should help you, or just check the README for the dependencies). This gives you a jack midi client and opens an OSC host at 192.168.X.X:57120 (Your computer's IP address : Default port). If you don't know your ip address you can get it with the terminal command ipconfig. Connect the jack midi out port to Carla or whatever you like (I'll proceed with assuming you are using Carla).

Now we need to connect the Control app to the OSC server. Click the destinations tab and the plus sign at the top to enter in the address of the OSC host. From there go back to the interfaces tab and select whatever interface sounds like it will tickle your fancy. For this exercise we'll go ahead and use the mixer interface. If it looks squashed or doesn't fit on the screen you probably have to go back to the menu and open the interface one more time. I always have to open it twice like that (obnoxious, right? you should really go fix that!).

In Carla, load a plugin. Simple amplifier is perfect. First connect the osc2midi output port to the simple amplifier events input port. Open the editing dialog for the plugin and click the parameters tab at the bottom. Simple amplifier only has a single parameter (gain) and so you'll see a single horizontal slider and 2 spinboxes right of it. These numbers select the midi control number (CC) and channel.

Since we called osc2midi without arguments it defaults to channel 1 (or 0 if you prefer 0 indexing) and the first slider in the mixer interface on your android device will send midi CC 1 so select "cc #1" in the middle numeric box. You just bound that midi control to change the amplifier gain. If your jack ports are all set up correctly you should be able to change the first slider on your phone/tablet and watch the slider in Carla wiggle up and down with it. You have CONTROL!!!

The setup
 The other sliders are just sequentially mapped through CC 12. You can figure out what anything is mapped to by either using kmidimon to look at the midi output or running osc2midi in verbose mode (osc2midi -v). You can add other plugins and control them by the same method. Get creative with it.

For my next trick, we'll make some sounds with Control. Hit the menu button on Control and select the Conway's Game of Life interface. The default mapping works but I include a better one with the installation. So in the terminal hit Ctl+C to stop osc2midi. We'll start it again specifying a different map file. Type in:
osc2midi -m gameOfLife.omm
And the server will be restarted on the same port so you won't need to change anything else.

Now lets load an instrument plugin into Carla. I like amsynth but you can use any you like (though a polyphonic one will probably be more fun for this exercise). With an instrument plugin loaded just connect the midi-in port of the instrument to the osc2midi output the the audio output from your plugin/carla to your soundcard. Click several of the buttons on the grid in Control and you should hear some notes start playing. They will stay on till you click it again. Or click the start button and the notes start toggling themselves and you have a nice random sequencer.

This isn't quite enough for simulating all the expression you can get out of a good synthesizer or midi controller, but its a start. The best part is these open tools are all highly configurable, so we have a working system with just using all the defaults. But we can also setup very powerful and custom configurations by tweaking the interface in Control, the mapping in osc2midi, and often the midi bindings in your destination program (like Carla). But we'll save the rest for another post. In the mean time, try all the templates and get creative with these tools.

by Spencer (noreply@blogger.com) at January 16, 2015 01:06 PM

January 15, 2015

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

AVL Drumkits - Multiple format drum samples from Glen MacArthur

Glen MacArthur, the maintainer of AV Linux, has done some more work and improvements on his existing drumkit libraries and added a completely new one called 'The Red Zeppelin'.

He has also set up a webpage with details and images of the sampled drumkits. Here you will find links to SFZ and SF2 sample libraries. Hydrogen kits are due to be uploaded soon.

by Conor at January 15, 2015 09:39 PM

Axoloti, open hardware unit, reaches crowdfunding goal

Axoloti is an interesting open hardware unit that allows "effects processing, step-sequencing, sample playback, or granular processing". It started its crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo at the end of December. It has already reached it's goal, with 2 weeks left of the campaign.

by Conor at January 15, 2015 03:07 PM

Setting up and using Drumgizmo in Ardour

What is Drumgizmo?

Drumgizmo is a drum sampler plugin available in the LV2 plugin format. It is also available as a standalone version. There are already drum samplers available for Linux, so what's so different about Drumgizmo?

Drumgizmo's main aim is to simulate a real drum kit. It supports the following features -

by Conor at January 15, 2015 11:24 AM

January 13, 2015

linux.autostatic.com » linux.autostatic.com

Packaging Python Stuff

While packaging Tuna I ran into an issue for which I couldn't easily find a workaround on the ubiquitous search engine. Tuna depends on some unavailable Python applications so those had to be packaged too. After having successfully tested the packages locally with pbuilder I uploaded them to Launchpad and noticed that they failed to build. Apparently the Python installer setup.py wants to install in /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages and while that worked fine locally with pbuilder, Launchpad had an issue with that:

Found files in /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages (must be in dist-packages for python2.7).
debian/python-schedutils/usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages
debian/python-schedutils/usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/schedutils.so
debian/python-schedutils/usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/schedutils-0.4-py2.7.egg-info
dh_builddeb.pkgbinarymangler: dpkg-deb --build debian/python-schedutils .. returned exit code 1
make: *** [binary-arch] Error 1
dpkg-buildpackage: error: /usr/bin/fakeroot debian/rules binary-arch gave error exit status 2

Apparently the files had to be installed in /usr/lib/python2.7/dist-packages but how to instruct the installer to do so without having to resort to ugly hacks? As I couldn't find any useful answers on the web I asked falkTX on #kxstudio. He said the setup.py installer has a flag to install to dist-packages instead of site-packages, --install-layout deb. So I added that to the debian/rules file and gave it another spin:

#!/usr/bin/make -f
# -*- makefile -*-
# Sample debian/rules that uses debhelper.
# This file was originally written by Joey Hess and Craig Small.
# As a special exception, when this file is copied by dh-make into a
# dh-make output file, you may use that output file without restriction.
# This special exception was added by Craig Small in version 0.37 of dh-make.

# Uncomment this to turn on verbose mode.
#export DH_VERBOSE=1

%:
dh $@

override_dh_auto_build:
python setup.py build

override_dh_auto_install:
python setup.py install --skip-build --prefix /usr --root $(CURDIR) --install-layout deb

Now both pbuilder and Launchpad built the package without any issues.

by Jeremy at January 13, 2015 02:06 PM

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

End of year survey results - 2014

*/

Thanks to everyone that filled out our end of year survey for 2014. As it was an open survey, there were a lot of different replies, but all the same, there are clear favourites in each category.

Here are the results -

 

by Conor at January 13, 2015 11:03 AM

January 12, 2015

Create Digital Music » open-source

Free AudioKit Lets iOS, Mac Developers Code Synths and Sound

AudioKit

AudioKit is a promising-looking new open source tool set for coding synthesizers, music, and sound on Apple platforms (though it could certainly be ported to other places if you have the time).

The draw: you get not only a robust library but loads of examples and tests, too, for a variety of applications, in both Objective-C and Apple’s new Swift language. And it’s free. The contributors will look familiar – and the core engine comes from community contributions around that most enduring of synthesis tools, Csound. (For those worried about obsolescence and the pace of technology, Csound has its roots in tools developed one half century ago, so in computer terms more or less the dawn of time.) In fact, what AudioKit is in effect is Csound as an audio engine, with Objective-C and Swift as the API – no orchestra/score files required. (And if you don’t know what I just said about “scores” and “orchestras” but do know Objective-C and Swift, well, this is definitely for you.)

There are examples for control and playback, convolution, FM and granular synthesis, and sequencing, among others. Below, they’ve produced a video that shows how a game can be enhanced with generated sound using the library. Features:

  • 100+ synths and effects, including physical models, spectral effects, granular synthesis, reverbs, etc.
  • Built-in sampling, complete with recording and storage functionality.
  • Sequencing you can trigger from code.
  • Examples with granular synthesis, convolution, effects processing, pitch-shifting, and more.
  • Human-readable code. (Yay, humans!) They write: “Conductors control Orchestras, which contain Instruments that produce Notes. Clear methods with Apple-style naming conventions, Xcode completion, documentation and tool-tips.”
  • Sound code you can integrate with your app logic.

AudioKit for Game Audio: Space Cannon from AudioKit on Vimeo.

Now, in some ways this is a mirror image of what we did with libpd. The notion of libpd was to separate sound and synthesis from the code that runs the app. The very same interactions are possible; the workflow emphasis is just different. (The basic principle of embedding a free tool as a library is otherwise the same, and this now means developers can use both Pure Data and Csound on the latest mobile platforms.)

Of course, a lot of us will choose both. For those comfortable with patching, or developers working with composers and sound designers who prefer to patch rather than code, using the two libraries together may make the most sense. For those comfortable with coding who want to sketch app logic and sound in the same environment, working with code directly here will be more appealing. (See also tools like Python’s lovely pyo.)

Add this to libpd, plus the weekend’s announcement of a new sync library, and it’s clear that free software and open source tools can coexist with Apple’s proprietary platform. At the risk of offending more rigid free software zealots, I think that’s only a good thing. It promotes coding literacy and self-sufficiency, and it demonstrates the flexibility, durability, and power of free software licenses to help people work together to solve problems. That can only encourage people to toy with free platforms, whether it’s connecting an Arduino or Raspberry Pi or dual-booting that Apple laptop to Linux. And having more shared code can also benefit platforms outside the walled garden.

Oh, plus it’s kind of fun making apps that make noises. Actually, I think that’s probably the most important bit. Check it out:

http://audiokit.io/features/

http://audiokit.io/blog/

Max Mathews, we miss you; it seems you will also live forever.

The post Free AudioKit Lets iOS, Mac Developers Code Synths and Sound appeared first on Create Digital Music.

by Peter Kirn at January 12, 2015 10:28 AM

LinuxMuso

Line 6 products (toneport, Pod, etc..) on Linux

Tonight after laying on the couch watching the NFL division playoffs unfold all day I decided to get active :D some research on how to interface to my line 6 spider iv amp through the Shortboard MKII seemed like a good idea and a great little project to maybe add to, who knows? I found http://sourceforge.net/projects/line6linux/ to be a most recent project that handles a driver module and a GUI. Support seemed a lil lacking since one person asked a question and seems yet to be answered 3 years later. But hey we all get busy sometimes , and documentation is not always priority. But here is a small helpful hint: The module or driver must first be build of course so we go to the directory $ cd ~/line6linux-code/driver/trunk do a $ make and then it should build the headers module in your kernel directory under $ /usr/source/linux-headers then we can su -c “insmod line6usb.ko” check that it was installed with $ lsmod that’s what I have checked so far, and ran into make errors for the apps ???? ok not too much on a Sunday night, goooo Packers!!!!

update: I found the driver doc here http://www.tanzband-scream.at/line6/driverdocs.pdf 

update: best use the mailing list for questions etc… thanks


by pete0verse at January 12, 2015 02:46 AM