planet.linuxaudio.org

May 05, 2016

News – Ubuntu Studio

Help Us Put Some Polish on Ubuntu Studio

We are proud to have Ubuntu Studio 16.04 out in the wild. And the next release can and should be better. It WILL be better if you help! Are there specific packages that should be included or removed? Are there features you would like to see? We cannot promise to do everything you ask, but […]

by Set Hallstrom at May 05, 2016 09:58 AM

May 03, 2016

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

Guitarix 0.35 released including much anticipated interface redesign

Guitarix 0.35 released including much anticipated interface redesign

Guitarix has recently seen a new release, version 0.35. As always there are new plugins and bug fixes but the big news with this release is the overhauled interface, compliments of Markus Schmidt. Markus is also responsible for CALF studio gears plugin design, as well as the DSP of many of it's plugins.  

by Conor at May 03, 2016 07:10 PM

April 27, 2016

rncbc.org

Qtractor 0.7.7 - The Haziest Photon is out!

Hi everybody,

On the wrap of the late miniLAC2016@c-base.org Berlin (April 8-10), where this Yet Same Old Qstuff* (continued) workshop babbling of yours truly (slides, videos) was taken place.

There's really one (big) thing to keep in mind, as always: Qtractor is not, never was, meant to be a do-it-all monolith DAW. Quite frankly it isn't a pure modular model either. Maybe we can agree on calling it a hybrid perhaps? And still, all this time, it has been just truthful to its original mission statement--modulo some Qt major version numbers--nb. it started on Qt3 (2005-2007), then Qt4 (2008-2014), it is now Qt5, full throttle.

Now,

It must have been like start saying uh. this is probably the best dot or, if you rather call it that way, beta release of them all!

Qtractor 0.7.7 (haziest photon) is out!

Everybody is here compelled to update.
Leave no excuses behind.

As for the mission statement coined above, you know it's the same as ever was (and it now goes to eleven years in the making):

Qtractor is an audio/MIDI multi-track sequencer application written in C++ with the Qt framework. Target platform is Linux, where the Jack Audio Connection Kit (JACK) for audio and the Advanced Linux Sound Architecture (ALSA) for MIDI are the main infrastructures to evolve as a fairly-featured Linux desktop audio workstation GUI, specially dedicated to the personal home-studio.

Website:

http://qtractor.sourceforge.net

Project page:

http://sourceforge.net/projects/qtractor

Downloads:

http://sourceforge.net/projects/qtractor/files

Git repos:

http://git.code.sf.net/p/qtractor/code
https://github.com/rncbc/qtractor.git
https://gitlab.com/rncbc/qtractor.git
https://bitbucket.org/rncbc/qtractor.git

Change-log:

  • LV2 UI Touch feature/interface support added.
  • MIDI aware plug-ins are now void from multiple or parallel instantiation.
  • MIDI tracks and buses plug-in chains now honor the number of effective audio channels from the assigned audio output bus; dedicated audio output ports will keep default to the stereo two channels.
  • Plug-in rescan option has been added to plug-ins selection dialog (yet another suggestion by Frank Neumann, thanks).
  • Dropped the --enable-qt5 from configure as found redundant given that's the build default anyway (suggestion by Guido Scholz, thanks).
  • Immediate visual sync has been added to main and MIDI clip editor thumb-views (a request by Frank Neumann, thanks).
  • Fixed an old MIDI clip editor contents disappearing bug, which manifested when drawing free-hand (ie. Edit/Select Mode/Edit Draw is on) over and behind its start/beginning position (while in the lower view pane).

Wiki (on going, help wanted!):

http://sourceforge.net/p/qtractor/wiki/

License:

Qtractor is free, open-source Linux Audio software, distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL) version 2 or later.

Flattr this

 

Enjoy && Have fun.

by rncbc at April 27, 2016 06:30 PM

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] Qtractor 0.7.7 - The Haziest Photon is out!

Hi everybody,

On the wrap of the late miniLAC2016@c-base.org Berlin (April 8-10)
[7][8], where this Yet Same Old Qstuff* (continued) workshop [9]
babbling of yours truly (slides, videos[10]) was taken place.

There's really one (big) thing to keep in mind, as always: Qtractor [1]
is not, never was, meant to be a 'do-it-all' monolith DAW. Quite frankly
it isn't a 'pure' modular model either. Maybe we can agree on calling it
a 'hybrid' perhaps? And still, all this time, it has been just truthful
to its original mission statement--modulo some Qt [2] major version
numbers--nb. it started on Qt3 (2005-2007), then Qt4 (2008-2014), it is
now Qt5 full throttle.

It must have been like start saying uh. this is probably the best dot or
rather beta release of them all!

Now,

Qtractor 0.7.7 (haziest photon) is out!

Everybody is here compelled to update.
Leave no excuses behind.

As for the 'mission statement' coined above, you know it's the same as
ever was (and it now goes to eleven years in the making [11]):

Qtractor [1] is an audio/MIDI multi-track sequencer application
written in C++ with the Qt framework [2]. Target platform is Linux,
where the Jack Audio Connection Kit (JACK [3]) for audio and the
Advanced Linux Sound Architecture (ALSA [4]) for MIDI are the main
infrastructures to evolve as a fairly-featured Linux desktop audio
workstation GUI, specially dedicated to the personal home-studio.

Website:
http://qtractor.sourceforge.net

Project page:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/qtractor

Downloads:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/qtractor/files
- source tarball:
http://download.sf.net/qtractor/qtractor-0.7.7.tar.gz
- source package:
http://download.sf.net/qtractor/qtractor-0.7.7-25.rncbc.suse.src.rpm
- binary packages:
http://download.sf.net/qtractor/qtractor-0.7.7-25.rncbc.suse.i586.rpm
http://download.sf.net/qtractor/qtractor-0.7.7-25.rncbc.suse.x86_84.rpm

Git repos:
http://git.code.sf.net/p/qtractor/code
https://github.com/rncbc/qtractor.git
https://gitlab.com/rncbc/qtractor.git
https://bitbucket.org/rncbc/qtractor.git

Change-log:
- LV2 UI Touch feature/interface support added.
- MIDI aware plug-ins are now void from multiple or parallel instantiation.
- MIDI tracks and buses plug-in chains now honor the number of effective
audio channels from the assigned audio output bus; dedicated audio
output ports will keep default to the stereo two channels.
- Plug-in rescan option has been added to plug-ins selection dialog (yet
another suggestion by Frank Neumann, thanks).
- Dropped the --enable-qt5 from configure as found redundant given
that's the build default anyway (suggestion by Guido Scholz, thanks).
- Immediate visual sync has been added to main and MIDI clip editor
thumb-views (a request by Frank Neumann, thanks).
- Fixed an old MIDI clip editor contents disappearing bug, which
manifested when drawing free-hand (ie. Edit/Select Mode/Edit Draw is on)
over and behind its start/beginning position (while in the lower view pane).

License:
Qtractor [1] is free, open-source Linux Audio [5] software,
distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL [6])
version 2 or later.

References:

[1] Qtractor - An audio/MIDI multi-track sequencer
http://qtractor.sourceforge.net

[2] Qt framework, C++ class library and tools for
cross-platform application and UI development
http://qt.io/

[3] JACK Audio Connection Kit
http://jackaudio.org

[4] ALSA, Advanced Linux Sound Architecture
http://www.alsa-project.org/

[5] Linux Audio consortium of libre software for audio-related work
http://linuxaudio.org

[6] GPL - GNU General Public License
http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/gpl.html

[7] miniLAC, a more compact, community-driven version of the yearly
Linux Audio Conference
http://minilac.linuxaudio.org

[8] c-base.org, Berlin
http://c-base.org

[9] Yet Same Old Qstuff* (continued) workshop

http://minilac.linuxaudio.org/index.php/Workshop#Yet_Same_Old_Qstuff.2A_.28continued.29

[10] slides:
http://minilac.linuxaudio.org/index.php/File:Lac2016_qstuff_slides.pdf
videos: http://media.ccc.de/v/minilac16-yetsameoldqstuff

[11] Siskel & Ebert - "This Is Spinal Tap"
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4gx4k83zzc


See also:
http://www.rncbc.org/drupal/node/1033


Enjoy && Have fun.
--
rncbc aka Rui Nuno Capela

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http://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-announce

by rncbc.org at April 27, 2016 04:25 PM

April 24, 2016

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] [LAU] [LAD] Guitarix 0.35.0 released

The Guitarix developers proudly present

Guitarix release 0.35.0

Guitarix is a tube amplifier simulation for
jack (Linux), with an additional mono and a stereo effect rack.
Guitarix includes a large list of plugins[*] and support LADSPA / LV2
plugs as well.

The guitarix engine is designed for LIVE usage, and feature ultra fast,
glitch and click free, preset switching, full Midi and/or remote
controllable (Web UI not included in the distributed tar ball).

This release introduce the new GUI design by Markus Schmidt aka. boomshop

Beside that, it comes with a couple of fixes and some new plugins.
Also included be the MOD UI's for the LV2 plugins used by the MOD[*]
For all changes, please check out the changelog.

Please refer to our project page for more information:
http://guitarix.sourceforge.net/

Download Site:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/guitarix/

Forum:
http://guitarix.sourceforge.net/forum/

Please consider visiting our forum or leaving a message on
guitarix-developer@lists.sourceforge.net
<mailto:guitarix-developer@lists.sourceforge.net>

regards
hermann

[*] http://moddevices.com/

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by web.de at April 24, 2016 06:40 AM

April 23, 2016

digital audio hacks – Hackaday

Color-Changing LED Makes Techno Music

As much as we like addressable LEDs for their obedience, why do we always have to control everything? At least participants of the MusicMaker Hacklab, which was part of the Artefact Festival in February this year, have learned, that sometimes we should just sit down with our electronics and listen.

With the end of the Artefact Festival approaching, they still had this leftover color-changing LED from an otherwise scavenged toy reverb microphone. When powered by a 9 V battery, the LED would start a tiny light show, flashing, fading and mixing the very best out of its three primary colors. Acoustically, however, it spent most of its time in silent dignity.

singing_led_led_anatomy

As you may know, this kind of LED contains a tiny integrated circuit. This IC pulse-width-modulates the current through the light-emitting junctions in preprogrammed patterns, thus creating the colorful light effects.

To give the LED a voice, the participants added a 1 kΩ series resistor to the LED’s “anode”, which effectively translates variations in the current passing through the LED into measurable variations of voltage. This signal could then be fed into a small speaker or a mixing console. The LED expressed its gratitude for the life-changing modification by chanting its very own disco song.

singing_led_hook_up_schematic

This particular IC seems to operate at a switching frequency of about 1.1 kHz and the resulting square wave signal noticeably dominates the mix. However, not everything we hear there may be explained solely by the PWM. There are those rhythmic “thump” noises, shifts in pitch and amplitude of the sound and more to analyze and learn from. Not wanting to spoil your fun of making sense of the beeps and cracks (feel free to spoil as much as you want in the comments!), we just say enjoy the video and thanks to the people of the STUK Belgium for sharing their findings.


Filed under: digital audio hacks, led hacks

by Moritz Walter at April 23, 2016 11:00 AM

April 22, 2016

open-source – cdm createdigitalmusic

Hack – listen to one LED create its own micro rave

Surprise: there’s a little tiny rave hiding inside a flickering LED lamp from a toy. Fortunately, we can bring it out – and you can try this yourself with LED circuitry, or just download our sound to remix.

Surprise Super Fun Disco LED Hack from Darsha Hewitt on Vimeo.

Amine Metani arvid
But let’s back up and tell the story of how this began.

The latest edition of our MusicMakers Hacklab brought us to Leuven, Belgium, and the Artefact Festival held at STUK. Now, with all these things, very often people come up with lofty (here, literally lofty) ideas – and that’s definitely half the fun. (We had one team flying an unmanned drone as a musical instrument.)

But sometimes it’s simple little ideas that steal the show. And so it was with a single LED superstar. Amine Mentani brought some plastic toys with flickering lights, and participant Arvid Jense, along my co-facilitator and all-around artist/inventor/magician Darsha Hewitt decided to make a sound experiment with them. They were joined by participant (and once European Space Agency artist resident) Elvire Flocken-Vitez.

It seems that the same timing used to make that faux flickering light effect generates analog voltages that sound, well, amazing. (See more on this technique in comments from readers below.)

DarshaHewitt_LEDHACK_01-1024x640

You might not get as lucky as we did with animated LEDs you find – or you might find something special, it’s tough to say. But you can certainly try it out yourself, following the instructions here and on a little site Darsha set up (or in the picture here).

And by the popular demand of all our Hacklabbers from Belgium, we’ve also made the sound itself available. So, you can try remixing thing, sampling it, dancing to it, whatever.

screenshot_344

https://freesound.org/people/dardi_2000/sounds/343087/

More:

http://www.darsha.org/artwork/disco-led-hack/

And follow our MusicMakers series on Facebook (or stay tuned here to CDM).

The post Hack – listen to one LED create its own micro rave appeared first on cdm createdigitalmusic.

by Peter Kirn at April 22, 2016 02:07 PM

GStreamer News

GStreamer Core, Plugins, RTSP Server, Editing Services, Validate 1.8.1 stable release (binaries)

Pre-built binary images of the 1.8.1 stable release of GStreamer are now available for Windows 32/64-bit, iOS and Mac OS X and Android.

The builds are available for download from: Android, iOS, Mac OS X and Windows.

April 22, 2016 12:00 PM

GStreamer Core, Plugins, RTSP Server, Editing Services, Validate 1.6.4 stable release (binaries)

Pre-built binary images of the 1.6.4 stable release of GStreamer are now available for Windows 32/64-bit, iOS and Mac OS X and Android.

The builds are available for download from: Android, iOS, Mac OS X and Windows.

April 22, 2016 11:00 AM

April 21, 2016

News – Ubuntu Studio

New Ubuntu Studio Release and New Project Lead!

New Project Lead In January 2016 we had an election for a new project lead, and the winner was Set Hallström, who will be taking over the project lead position right after this release. He will be continuing for another two years until the next election in 2018. The team of developers has also seen […]

by Set Hallstrom at April 21, 2016 04:44 PM

April 20, 2016

GStreamer News

GStreamer Core, Plugins, RTSP Server, Editing Services, Python, Validate, VAAPI 1.8.1 stable release

The GStreamer team is pleased to announce the first bugfix release in the stable 1.8 release series of your favourite cross-platform multimedia framework!

This release only contains bugfixes and it should be safe to update from 1.8.0. For a full list of bugfixes see Bugzilla.

See /releases/1.8/ for the full release notes.

Binaries for Android, iOS, Mac OS X and Windows will be available shortly.

Check out the release notes for GStreamer core, gst-plugins-base, gst-plugins-good, gst-plugins-ugly, gst-plugins-bad, gst-libav, gst-rtsp-server, gst-python, gst-editing-services, gst-validate, or gstreamer-vaapi, or download tarballs for gstreamer, gst-plugins-base, gst-plugins-good, gst-plugins-ugly, gst-plugins-bad, gst-libav, gst-rtsp-server, gst-python, gst-editing-services, gst-validate, or gstreamer-vaapi.

April 20, 2016 04:00 PM

OSM podcast

aubio

node-aubio

node.js

node.js logo

Thanks to Gray Leonard, aubio now has its own bindings for node.js.

A fork of Gray's git repo can be found at:

A simple example showing how to extract bpm and pitch from an audio file with node-aubio is included.

To install node-aubio, make sure libaubio is installed on your system, and follow the instructions at npmjs.com.

April 20, 2016 12:28 PM

April 17, 2016

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

New video tutorial describing a complete audio production workflow using Muse and Ardour

New video tutorial describing a complete audio production workflow using Muse and Ardour

Libre Music Production proudly presents Michael Oswalds new 8+ hours video tutorial describing a complete audio production workflow using Muse and Ardour.

In this tutorial you will learn how to import, clean up and edit a MIDI file using MusE. It then goes on to show how to import the MIDI file into Ardour and setting up instruments to play the song. On to guitar recording and audio editing in Ardour, selecting sounds and editing several takes.

The tutorial continues with vocal recording and editing, mixing and mastering the song.

by admin at April 17, 2016 04:19 PM

A complete audio production workflow with Muse and Ardour

Audio production with Muse and Ardour is a 6 part video tutorial showing a complete workflow using FLOSS audio tools.

In this tutorial you will learn how to import, clean up and edit a MIDI file using MusE. It then goes on to show how to import the MIDI file into Ardour and setting up instruments to play the song.

On to guitar recording and audio editing in Ardour, selecting sounds and editing the takes.

The tutorial continues with vocal recording and editing, mixing and mastering the song.

by admin at April 17, 2016 02:51 PM

April 15, 2016

digital audio hacks – Hackaday

Hackaday Dictionary: Ultrasonic Communications

Say you’ve got a neat gadget you are building. You need to send data to it, but you want to keep it simple. You could add a WiFi interface, but that sucks up power. Bluetooth Low Energy uses less power, but it can get complicated, and it’s overkill if you are just looking to send a small amount of data. If your device has a microphone, there is another way that you might not have considered: ultrasonic communications.

clipThe idea of using sound frequencies above the limit of human hearing has a number of advantages. Most devices already have speakers and microphones capable of sending and receiving ultrasonic signals, so there is no need for extra hardware. Ultrasonic frequencies are beyond the range of human hearing, so they won’t usually be audible. They can also be transmitted alongside standard audio, so they won’t interfere with the function of a media device.

A number of gadgets already use this type of communications. The Google Chromecast HDMI dongle can use it, overlaying an ultrasonic signal on the audio output it sends to the TV. It uses this to pair with a guest device by sending a 4-digit code over ultrasound that authorizes it to join an ad-hoc WiFi network and stream content to it. The idea is that, if the device can’t pick up the ultrasound signal, it probably wasn’t invited to the party.

We reported some time ago on an implementation of ultrasonic data using GNU Radio by [Chris]. His writeup goes into a lot of detail on how he set the system up and shows a simple demo using a laptop speaker and microphone. He used Frequency Shift Keying (FSK) to encode the data into the audio, using a base frequency of 23Khz and sending data in five byte packets.

Since then, [Chris] has expanded his system to create a bi-directional system, where two devices communicate bi-directionally using different frequencies. He also changed the modulation scheme to gaussian frequency shift keying for reliability and even added a virtual driver layer on top, so the connection can transfer TCP/IP traffic. Yup, he built an ultrasonic network connection.

His implementation underlines one of the problems with this type of data transmission, though: It is slow. The speed of the data transmission is limited by the ability of the system to transmit and receive the data, and [Chris] found that he needed to keep it slow to work with cheap microphones and speakers. Specifically, he had to keep the number of samples per symbol used by the GFSK modulation high, giving the receiver more time to spot the frequency shift for each symbol in the data stream. That’s probably because the speaker and microphone aren’t specifically designed for this sort of frequency. The system also requires a preamble before each data packet, which adds to the latency of the connection.

So ultrasonic communications may not be fast, but they are harder to intercept than WiFi or other radio frequency signals. Especially if you aren’t looking for them, which inspired hacker [Kate Murphy] to create Quietnet, a simple Python chat system that uses the PyAudio library to send ultrasonic chat messages. For extra security, the system even allows you to change the carrier frequency, which could be useful if the feds are onto you. Whether overt, covert, or just for simple hardware configuration, ultrasonic communications is something to consider playing around with and adding to your bag of hardware tricks.


Filed under: digital audio hacks, Hackaday Columns, wireless hacks

by Richard Baguley at April 15, 2016 05:01 PM

April 14, 2016

GStreamer News

GStreamer 1.6.4 stable release

The GStreamer team is pleased to announce the second bugfix release in the old stable 1.6 release series of your favourite cross-platform multimedia framework!

This release only contains bugfixes and it should be safe to update from 1.6.x. For a full list of bugfixes see Bugzilla.

See /releases/1.6/ for the full release notes.

Binaries for Android, iOS, Mac OS X and Windows will be available shortly.

Check out the release notes for GStreamer core, gst-plugins-base, gst-plugins-good, gst-plugins-ugly, gst-plugins-bad, gst-libav, gst-rtsp-server, gst-editing-services, gst-python, or or download tarballs for gstreamer, gst-plugins-base, gst-plugins-good, gst-plugins-ugly, gst-plugins-bad, gst-libav, gst-rtsp-server, gst-editing-services. gst-python.

April 14, 2016 06:00 PM

Linux – cdm createdigitalmusic

A totally free DAW and live environment, built in SuperCollider: LNX_Studio

Imagine you had a DAW with lots of live tools and synths and effects – a bit like FL Studio or Ableton Live – and it was completely free. (Free as in beer, free as in freedom.) That’s already fairly cool. Now imagine that everything in that environment – every synth, every effect, every pattern maker – was built in SuperCollider, the powerful free coding language for electronic music. And imagine you could add your own stuff, just by coding, and it ran natively. That moves from fairly cool to insanely cool. And it’s what you get with LNX_Studio, a free environment that runs on any OS (Mac now, other builds coming), and that got a major upgrade recently. Let’s have a look.

LNX_Studio is a full-blown synth studio. You can do end-to-end production of entire tracks in it, if you choose. Included:

  • Virtual analog synths, effects, drum machines
  • Step sequencers, piano roll (with MIDI import), outboard gear control
  • Mix engine and architecture
  • Record audio output
  • Automation, presets, and programs (which with quick recall make this a nice idea starter or live setup
  • Chord library, full MIDI output and external equipment integration

It’s best compared to the main view of FL Studio, or the basic rack in Reason, or the devices in Ableton Live, in that the focus is building up songs through patterns and instruments and effects. What you don’t get is audio input, multitracking, or that sort of linear arrangement. Then again, for a lot of electronic music, that’s still appealing – and you could always combine this with something like Ardour (to stay in free software) when it’s time to record tracks.

Also good in this age of external gear lust, all those pattern generators and MIDI control layouts play nice with outboard gear. There’s even an “external device” which you can map to outboard controls.

But all of this you can do in other software. And it’d be wrong to describe LNX_Studio as a free, poor man’s version of that gear, because it can do two things those tools can’t.

First, it’s entirely networked. You can hop onto a local network or the Internet and collaborate with other users. (Theoretically, anyway – I haven’t gotten to try this out yet, but the configuration looks dead simple.)

Second, and this I did play with, you can write your own synths and effects in SuperCollider and run them right in the environment. And unlike environments like Max for Live, that integration is fully native to the tool. You just hop right in, add some code, and go. To existing SuperCollider users, this is finally an integrated environment for running all your creations. To those who aren’t, this might get you hooked.

Here’s a closer look in pictures:

When you first get started, you're presented with a structured environment to add instruments, effects, pattern generators, and so on.

When you first get started, you’re presented with a structured environment to add instruments, effects, pattern generators, and so on.

Fully loaded, the environment resembles portions of FL Studio or Ableton Live. You get a conventional mixer display, and easy access to your tools.

Fully loaded, the environment resembles portions of FL Studio or Ableton Live. You get a conventional mixer display, and easy access to your tools.

Oh, yeah, and out of the box, you get some powerful, nice-sounding virtual analog synths.

Oh, yeah, and out of the box, you get some powerful, nice-sounding virtual analog synths.

But here's the powerful part - inside every synth is SuperCollider code you can easily modify. And you can add your own code using this powerful, object-oriented, free and open source code environment for musicians.

But here’s the powerful part – inside every synth is SuperCollider code you can easily modify. And you can add your own code using this powerful, object-oriented, free and open source code environment for musicians.

Effects can use SuperCollider code, too. There's also a widget library, so adding a graphical user interface is easy.

Effects can use SuperCollider code, too. There’s also a widget library, so adding a graphical user interface is easy.

But whether you're ready to code or not doesn't matter much - there's a lot to play with either way. Sequencers...

But whether you’re ready to code or not doesn’t matter much – there’s a lot to play with either way. Sequencers…

Drum machines...

Drum machines…

More instruments...

More instruments…

You also get chord generators and (here) a piano roll editor.

You also get chord generators and (here) a piano roll editor.

When you're ready to play with others, there's also network capability for jamming in the same room or over a network (or the Internet).

When you’re ready to play with others, there’s also network capability for jamming in the same room or over a network (or the Internet).

Version 2.0 is just out, and adds loads of functionality and polish. Most importantly, you can add your own sound samples, and work with everything inside a mixer environment with automation. Overview of the new features (in case you saw the older version):

Main Studio
Channel style Mixer
Programs (group & sequence Instrument presets)
Automation
Auto fade in/out
Levels dispay
Synchronise channels independently
Sample support in GS Rhythm & SCCode instruments
WebBrowser for importing samples directly from the internet
Local sample support
Sample Cache for off-line use
Bum Note
Now polyphonic
Added Triangle wave & Noise
High Pass filter
2 Sync-able LFO’s
PWM
Melody Maker module (chord progressions, melodies + hocket)
Inport MIDI files
Audio In
Support for External instruments & effects
Interfaces for Moog Sub37, Roland JP-08, Korg Volca series
Many new instruments & effects added to SCCode & SCCodeF

I love what’s happening with Eurorack and hardware modular – and there’s nothing like physical knobs and cables. But that said, for anyone who brags that modular environments are a “clean slate” and open environment, I think they’d do well to look at this, too. The ability to code weird new instruments and effects to me is also a way to find originality. And since not everyone can budget for buying hardware, you can run this right now, on any computer you already own, for free. I think that’s wonderful, because it means all you need is your brain and some creativity. And that’s a great thing.

Give the software a try:

http://lnxstudio.sourceforge.net

And congrats to Neil Cosgrove for his work on this – let’s send some love and support his way.

The post A totally free DAW and live environment, built in SuperCollider: LNX_Studio appeared first on cdm createdigitalmusic.

by Peter Kirn at April 14, 2016 05:05 PM

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] KMI KBoard Editor

Hi all:

I picked up one of these KMI kboards and wanted to play with the
configuration settings, but couldn't get their editor to work through
wine, so I wrote a python script that edits and dumps the sysex for
configuration. Its very utilitarian, but already I'm glad I wrote it
since every instrument seems to play better with slightly different
settings. Of course this program is offered without any guarantees,
especially since its messing with hardware.

If anyone has or considers getting one of these keyboards he or she
can keep this project in mind for configuring it in linux.

https://github.com/ssj71/kboard-editor

later,
_Spencer
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by gmail.com at April 14, 2016 04:29 PM

blog4

Tina Mariane Krogh Madsen: Body Interfaces: A Processual Scripting

TMS member Tina Mariane Krogh Madsen going to show a week of a durational performative installation with guests, in Berlin at Galerie Grüntaler 9 (at Grüntaler Strasse 9 as the name suggests) from 15. - 22. April:

Body Interfaces: A Processual Scripting is a performative installation generated by Tina Mariane Krogh Madsen over the duration of one week. It wishes to raise questions regarding the role of documentation in artistic research, its status and how it can feed into other processes.
In the spatial frames of Grüntaler9 the artist will be intensively working with and redeveloping her own concept of an archive and resources based on the documents and remains from previous performances and interventions, which will additionally be resulting in other performance structures.
The installation is in an ongoing process that can be witnessed everyday from 2-8pm. On selected days there will be guests invited to discuss and perform with the artist in the space.
::::::::: Tina Mariane Krogh Madsen’s research works with the body and (as) materiality via combining understandings of it that are derived from site-specific performance art and from working with technology.
A crucial part of this research takes the form of interventions and performances, collectively titled Body Interfaces, first generated during a residency in Iceland (May, 2015) and since then developed and performed in various contexts, constantly challenging their own format and method. These practices deal with the body as interface for experience and communication in relation to other materialities as well as the environment that surrounds and interacts with these. The interface is here read as a transmitting entity and agency between the body and the surrounding surfaces. An important part of Body Interfaces is its own documentation, in various formats, shapes and scripted entities.
The processual installation is open daily from 14:00 until 20:00 and can be witnessed at all time. The processual scripting has a dynamic approach to the space and therefore the installation will arrive and evolve throughout the days, nothing has been in installed in advance – all is part of the process.
The research topic will be shared through performances and interventions as well as an ongoing reel of performance documentation.
Friday April 15: inauguration and installation:
- 14:00h - 19:00h: performative installation (working session)
- 20:00h - 20:30: Body Interfaces Performance
- from 21:00: Fridäy Süpperclüb (food and drinks by donation)
Saturday April 16: sound (research collaborator: Malte Steiner):
- 14:00h - 19:00h: performative installation (working session)
- 19:00h: sound performance
Sunday April 17: body and site (research collaborator: Nathalie Fari):
- 14:00 - 17:00: performative installation (working session)
- 17:00 - 20:00: performance interventions with Nathalie Fari
Monday April 18: archiving as practice / restructuring and re-contextualizing materials (research collaborator: Joel Verwimp):
14:00h - 20:00h: performative installation with performance interventions (working session)
Tuesday April 19: chance as method – invigorating performative structures:
- 14:00h - 20:00h: performative installation with performance interventions (working session)
Wednesday April 20: instruction: re-performance / transformation I (research collaborator: Aleks Slota):
- 14:00h - 20:00h: performative installation with performance interventions (working session)
Thursday April 21: ritual(s)
- 14:00h - 20:00h: performative installation with performance interventions (working session)
Friday April 22: instruction: re-performance / transformation II (research collaborator: Ilya Noé):
- 14:00h - 18:00h: performative installation with performance interventions (working session)
- 20:00h: Body Interfaces Processual Scripting Resume
- from 21:00: Fridäy Süpperclüb (food and drinks by donation)





::::::::: Performative schedule for April 15. to 22.:

by herrsteiner (noreply@blogger.com) at April 14, 2016 03:32 PM

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] Rivendell v2.12.0

On behalf of the entire Rivendell development team, I'm pleased to announce the availability of Rivendell v2.12.0. Rivendell is a full-featured radio automation system targeted for use in professional broadcast environments. It is available under the GNU General Public License.

From the NEWS file:
*** snip snip ***
Changes:
Sequential Cut Play-Out. Cuts can now be configured on a per-cart basis
to play in a set sequential order rather than by relative weight value.

New Switcher Support. Support has been added for the Broadcast Tools
ADMS 44.22 and SS 4.1 MLR switchers.

New RML. A 'Copy Cut' ['CP'] RML has been added that allows cuts to
be copied between carts.

RDLogEdit Changes. Added a 'Show Only Recent Logs' checkbox.

New Web API Methods. The following new methods have been added to the
web API:
AssignSchedCode
ListCartSchedCodes
ListSchedCodes
UnassignSchedCode

Database Schema Reversion. Added an rdrevert(8) command to allow
database schema changes to be reverted to an earlier version (experimental).

Documentation Changes. The documentation has been converted to
XML-DocBook5.

Various other bug fixes. See the ChangeLog for details.

Database Update:
This version of Rivendell uses database schema version 254, and will
automatically upgrade any earlier versions. To see the current schema
version prior to upgrade, see RDAdmin->SystemInfo.

As always, be sure to run RDAdmin immediately after upgrading to allow
any necessary changes to the database schema to be applied.
*** snip snip ***

Further information, screenshots and download links are available at:

http://www.rivendellaudio.org/ <">">http://www.rivendellaudio.org/> <http://www.rivendellaudio.org/ <>">>">http://www.rivendellaudio.org/>>

Cheers!


|----------------------------------------------------------------------|
| Frederick F. Gleason, Jr. | Chief Developer |
| | Paravel Systems |
|----------------------------------------------------------------------|
| "No, `Eureka!' is Greek for `This bath is too hot!'" |
| -- Dr. Who |
|----------------------------------------------------------------------|

by paravelsystems.com at April 14, 2016 12:38 PM

April 11, 2016

OpenAV

Fabla2 @ miniLAC video!

In an amazingly short time, the streaming videos of miniLAC are online!! OpenAV’s Fabla2 video linked here, for other streaming links, checkout https://media.ccc.de/v/minilac16-openav. Huge thanks to the Stream-Team for their amazing work! Read more →

by harry at April 11, 2016 09:11 AM

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] Commercial synthesizer for Linux released: Monique

Hallo Linux Audio User,

a few days ago Monoplugs has released Monique - a unique monophonic
synthesizer made for bass and lead sounds. Available as standalone and
native Linux VST 32 & 64 bit. You can test this synthesizer for free,
but note, it is a commercial project.

More you can find on the Monique website: http://Monique.Monoplugs.com

Here the trailer video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yPsa-3aAFms
More videos and tutorials you can find here:
http://magazine.monoplugs.com/category/monique-synthesizer/

If you like you can join the discussion on the LinuxMusicians forum:
https://linuxmusicians.com/viewtopic.php?f$&t558
Or on KVR forum: http://www.kvraudio.com/forum/viewtopic.php?tE9681
Or gearslutz forum:
https://www.gearslutz.com/board/new-product-alert/1077291-monoplugs-releases-monique-synthesizer-windows-mac-os-x-linux.html

Sincerly,
Thomas Arndt
Monoplugs
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by monoplugs.com at April 11, 2016 07:42 AM

April 07, 2016

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] Beast 0.10.0 and Rapicorn 16.0.0

Rapicorn is a toolkit for declarative UIs and SVG-based theming, see:
http://rapicorn.org/ https://testbit.eu/pub/dists/rapicorn/
Beast is an audio composer and modular synthesis application, see:
http://beast.testbit.eu/ https://testbit.eu/pub/dists/beast/

Lots of work went into the build system and linux distribution porting lately and it's starting to pay off. As I type this, the build machines are running hot, building packages based on the new versions. Once they are done, new binary packages for installation can be found here:
https://bintray.com/beast-team/deb

This is another one in a series of recent releases that have changed a lot under the hood but yet have little user interface visible impacts. That's going to change in the future, but before that point, here come some notable new features for developers. With recent improvements to the IDL compiler in Rapicorn, the BSE library could be wrapped in Python, so it is now possible to run the following little program in Python:

import Bse, time
Bse.server.register_core_plugins()
time.sleep (1.5) # give time to load plugins
prj = Bse.server.create_project ("example")
prj.restore_from_file ("/usr/share/beast/demo/partymonster.bse")
prj.play()
# listen... ;-)

Starting with this release, we'll use a more stringent versioning scheme, to summarize:
* MAJOR: Increments on major API breaks, *forces* ABI break, resets MINOR, MICRO
* MINOR: Increments for significant changes or ABI breaks, resets MICRO
* MICRO: Increments with every release, increments must *not* break ABI
* ABI change: Increments MAJOR or MINOR and resets MICRO
Also MAJOR ideally reflects the year a major release was started.

Please test and provide feedback so we can improve the experience. The detailed NEWS are appended for the curious.

Rapicorn 16.0.0: (2016-04-07)

* Remove internal librsvg copy, require an installed librsvg-2.0.
* Provide enum meta information for enum values stored in Any.
* Provide change notification signals for Parameter.
* Cleanup threads via atexit(3).
* Added support for auxillary data on IDL sequence and record definitions.
* Added compatibility code to downgrade cython requirement to 0.20.1 for trusty.
* Added fixes for g++-4.8.4 and libtool >= 1.5.2.
* Grow Any content to enable structured type and small string optimizations.
* Remove remove Atomic<> in favour of the "Construct On First Use Idiom".
* Improved exception specifications to satisfy cython-0.23.3.
* Reduced unit testing time, individually and by tuning the benchmark timers.
* Use xvfb-run(1) to run X11 related unit tests.
* Support and use the TAP protocol for unit test evaluation.
* New versioning: Releases increase MAJOR for major API changes.
* New versioning: Releases increase MINOR in case of any ABI breaks.
* New versioning: Releases increase MICRO for backwards compatibility.
* New versioning: The MAJOR number ideally matches the release year.
* The Python module alias remans 'Rapicorn', stored in Rapicorn_15/.
* C++ namespace changed to 'Rapicorn', files install under 'rapicorn-$MAJOR'.
* The librapicorn shared library supports installation of multiple versions.
* Many build system fixes and integration of travis-ci builds.
* Automatically built Debian packages are now on http://bintray.com/beast-team/.
* The file debian/copyright now contains an accurate licensing account.
* Install cython headers to allow IDL Python bindings outside Rapicorn.
* Add AutoSeeder class to provide good non-deterministic seeding entropy.
* Add PCG-32 which provides fast but well distributed pseudo random numbers.
* Include a random_secret() in hash functions to avoid collision attacks.
* Use Python enum classes and C++11 enum classes in IDL code generation.
* Fixed shebang to reliably find Python2.7. [Milk Brewster]

Beast 0.10.0: (2016-04-07)

* Memory leak and stability fixes.
* Removal of deprecated Glib/Gtk+ functions.
* A new binary 'bsetool' subsumes several old utilities.
* Removal of unused utilities and several places with dead code.
* Several classes are now (fully) ported to new AIDA IDL: SNet Track
TrackPart Bus SampleFileInfo Project MusicalTuning NoteDescription Icon
* More porting work to use Rapicorn C++11 utilities.
* Fixes for g++-4.9 which has become a hard dependency.
* Support and use the TAP protocol for unit test evaluation.
* New versioning: Releases increase MAJOR for major API changes.
* New versioning: Releases increase MINOR in case of any ABI breaks.
* New versioning: Releases increase MICRO for backwards compatibility.
* Now libbse supports parallel installation of runtime library packages.
* Now various program and module installation paths include MAJOR.
* Fix build issues with external libbse plugins.
* Fix LADSPAv1 plugin registration failing to detect some plugins.
* Provide C++11 API for undo/redo functions.
* Add pybse API wrapper that allows Python to 'import Bse'.
* Start a Python interpreter from Beast.
* Split up Beast main() methods to run event loop from Python.
* Port libbse to use C++11 scoped enums.


--
Yours sincerely,
Tim Janik

https://testbit.eu/timj/
Free software author.
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by gnu.org at April 07, 2016 01:49 PM

April 06, 2016

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

The Qstuff* Spring'16 Release Frenzy

The Qstuff* Spring'16 Release Frenzy

On the wake of the miniLAC2016@c-base.org Berlin, and keeping up with tradition, the most venerable of the Qstuff* are under so called Spring'16 release frenzy.

Enjoy the party!

by yassinphilip at April 06, 2016 05:01 PM

April 05, 2016

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] Qtractor 0.7.6 - A Hazier Photon is released!

Hey, Spring'16 release frenzy [7] isn't over as of just yet ;)

Keeping up with the tradition,

Qtractor 0.7.6 (a hazier photon) is released!

Qtractor [1] is an audio/MIDI multi-track sequencer application
written in C++ with the Qt framework [2]. Target platform is Linux,
where the Jack Audio Connection Kit (JACK [3]) for audio and the
Advanced Linux Sound Architecture (ALSA [4]) for MIDI are the main
infrastructures to evolve as a fairly-featured Linux desktop audio
workstation GUI, specially dedicated to the personal home-studio.

Website:
http://qtractor.sourceforge.net

Downloads:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/qtractor/files
- source tarball:
http://download.sf.net/qtractor/qtractor-0.7.6.tar.gz
- source package:
http://download.sf.net/qtractor/qtractor-0.7.6-24.rncbc.suse.src.rpm
- binary packages:
http://download.sf.net/qtractor/qtractor-0.7.6-24.rncbc.suse.i586.rpm
http://download.sf.net/qtractor/qtractor-0.7.6-24.rncbc.suse.x86_84.rpm

Git repos:
http://git.code.sf.net/p/qtractor/code
https://github.com/rncbc/qtractor

Change-log:
- Plug-ins search path and out-of-process (aka. dummy) VST plug-in
inventory scanning has been heavily refactored.
- Fixed and optimized all dummy processing for plugins with more audio
inputs and/or outputs than channels on a track or bus where it's inserted.
- Fixed relative/absolute path mapping when saving/loading custom LV2
Plug-in State Presets.

License:
Qtractor [1] is free, open-source Linux Audio [5] software,
distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL [6])
version 2 or later.

References:

[1] Qtractor - An audio/MIDI multi-track sequencer
http://qtractor.sourceforge.net

[2] Qt framework, C++ class library and tools for
cross-platform application and UI development
http://qt.io/

[3] JACK Audio Connection Kit
http://jackaudio.org

[4] ALSA, Advanced Linux Sound Architecture
http://www.alsa-project.org/

[5] Linux Audio consortium of libre software for audio-related work
http://linuxaudio.org

[6] GPL - GNU General Public License
http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/gpl.html

[7] The Qstuff* Spring'16 Release Frenzy
http://www.rncbc.org/drupal/node/1026


See also:
http://www.rncbc.org/drupal/node/1028


Enjoy && Keep the fun, always.
--
rncbc aka. Rui Nuno Capela
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by rncbc.org at April 05, 2016 09:14 PM

[LAA] The Qstuff* Spring'16 Release Frenzy

Hi,

On the wake of the miniLAC2016@c-base.org Berlin [14], and keeping up
with tradition, the most venerable of the Qstuff* are under the so
called Spring'16 release frenzy...

Enjoy the party!

- QjackCtl 0.4.2
- Qsynth 0.4.1
- Qsampler 0.4.0
- QXGEdit 0.4.0
- QmidiCtl 0.4.0
- QmidiNet 0.4.0

Details are as follows...


**QjackCtl - JACK Audio Connection Kit Qt GUI Interface [1]**

QjackCtl 0.4.2 (spring'16) released!

QjackCtl [1] is a(n ageing but still) simple Qt [7] application to
control the JACK [8] sound server, for the Linux Audio [12] infrastructure.

Website:
http://qjackctl.sourceforge.net

Downloads:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/qjackctl/files
- source tarball:
http://download.sf.net/qjackctl/qjackctl-0.4.2.tar.gz
- source package:
http://download.sf.net/qjackctl/qjackctl-0.4.2-25.rncbc.suse.src.rpm
- binary packages:
http://download.sf.net/qjackctl/qjackctl-0.4.2-25.rncbc.suse.i586.rpm
http://download.sf.net/qjackctl/qjackctl-0.4.2-25.rncbc.suse.x86_84.rpm

Git repos:
http://git.code.sf.net/p/qjackctl/code
https://github.com/rncbc/qjackctl

Change-log:
- Added a brand new "Enable JACK D-BUS interface" option, split from the
old common "Enable D-BUS interface" setup option which now refers to its
own self D-BUS interface exclusively.
- Dropped old "Start minimized to system tray" option from setup.
- Add double-click action (toggle start/stop) to systray (a pull request
by Joel Moberg, thanks).
- Added application keywords to freedesktop.org's AppData.
- System-tray icon context menu has been fixed/hacked to show up again
on Plasma 5 (aka. KDE5) notification status area.
- Switched column entries in the unified interface device combo-box to
make it work for macosx/coreaudio again.
- Blind fix to a FTBFS on macosx/coreaudio platforms, a leftover from
the unified interface device selection combo-box inception, almost two
years ago.
- Prevent x11extras module from use on non-X11/Unix plaforms.
- Late French (fr) translation update (by Olivier Humbert, thanks).

License:
QjackCtl [1] is free, open-source Linux Audio [12] software,
distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL [13])
version 2 or later.


**Qsynth - A fluidsynth Qt GUI Interface [2]**

Qsynth 0.4.1 (spring'16) released!

Qsynth [2] is a FluidSynth GUI front-end application written in C++
around the Qt framework [7] using Qt Designer.

Website:
http://qsynth.sourceforge.net

Downloads:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/qsynth/files
- source tarball:
http://download.sf.net/qsynth/qsynth-0.4.1.tar.gz
- source package:
http://download.sf.net/qsynth/qsynth-0.4.1-7.rncbc.suse.src.rpm
- binary packages:
http://download.sf.net/qsynth/qsynth-0.4.1-7.rncbc.suse.i586.rpm
http://download.sf.net/qsynth/qsynth-0.4.1-7.rncbc.suse.x86_84.rpm

Git repos:
http://git.code.sf.net/p/qsynth/code
https://github.com/rncbc/qsynth

Change-log:
- Dropped old "Start minimized to system tray" option from setup.
- CMake script lists update (patch by Orcan Ogetbil, thanks).
- Added application keywords to freedesktop.org's AppData.
- System-tray icon context menu has been fixed/hacked to show up again
on Plasma 5 (aka. KDE5) notifications status area.
- Prevent x11extras module from use on non-X11/Unix plaforms.
- Messages standard output capture has been improved in both ways a
non-blocking pipe may get.
- Regression fix for invalid system-tray icon dimensions reported by
some desktop environment frameworks.

License:
Qsynth [2] is free, open-source Linux Audio [12] software,
distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL [13])
version 2 or later.


**Qsampler - A LinuxSampler Qt GUI Interface [3]**

Qsampler 0.4.0 (spring'16) released!

Qsampler [3] is a LinuxSampler [11] GUI front-end application written
in C++ around the Qt framework [7] using Qt Designer.

Website:
http://qsampler.sourceforge.net

Downloads:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/qsampler/files
- source tarball:
http://download.sf.net/qsampler/qsampler-0.4.0.tar.gz
- source package:
http://download.sf.net/qsampler/qsampler-0.4.0-17.rncbc.suse.src.rpm
- binary packages:
http://download.sf.net/qsampler/qsampler-0.4.0-17.rncbc.suse.i586.rpm
http://download.sf.net/qsampler/qsampler-0.4.0-17.rncbc.suse.x86_84.rpm

Git repos:
http://git.code.sf.net/p/qsampler/code
https://github.com/rncbc/qsampler

Change-log:
- Added application keywords to freedesktop.org's AppData.
- Prevent x11extras module from use on non-X11/Unix plaforms.
- Messages standard output capture has been improved again, now in both
ways a non-blocking pipe may get.
- Single/unique application instance control adapted to Qt5/X11.

License:
Qsampler is free, open-source Linux Audio [12] software, distributed
under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL [13]) version 2
or later.


**QXGEdit - A Qt XG Editor [4]**

QXGEdit 0.4.0 (spring'16) released!

QXGEdit [4] is a live XG instrument editor, specialized on editing
MIDI System Exclusive files (.syx) for the Yamaha DB50XG and thus
probably a baseline for many other XG devices.

Website:
http://qxgedit.sourceforge.net

Downloads:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/qxgedit/files
- source tarball:
http://download.sf.net/qxgedit/qxgedit-0.4.0.tar.gz
- source package:
http://download.sf.net/qxgedit/qxgedit-0.4.0-7.rncbc.suse.src.rpm
- binary packages:
http://download.sf.net/qxgedit/qxgedit-0.4.0-7.rncbc.suse.i586.rpm
http://download.sf.net/qxgedit/qxgedit-0.4.0-7.rncbc.suse.x86_84.rpm

Git repos:
http://git.code.sf.net/p/qxgedit/code
https://github.com/rncbc/qxgedit

Change-log:
- Prevent x11extras module from use on non-X11/Unix plaforms.
- French (fr) translations update (by Olivier Humbert, thanks).
- Fixed port on MIDI 14-bit controllers input caching.

License:
QXGEdit [4] is free, open-source Linux Audio [12] software,
distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL [13])
version 2 or later.


**QmidiCtl - A MIDI Remote Controller via UDP/IP Multicast [5]**

QmidiCtl 0.4.0 (spring'16) released!

QmidiCtl [5] is a MIDI remote controller application that sends MIDI
data over the network, using UDP/IP multicast. Inspired by multimidicast
(http://llg.cubic.org/tools) and designed to be compatible with ipMIDI
for Windows (http://nerds.de). QmidiCtl has been primarily designed for
the Maemo enabled handheld devices, namely the Nokia N900 and also being
promoted to the Maemo Package repositories. Nevertheless, QmidiCtl may
still be found effective as a regular desktop application as well.

Website:
http://qmidictl.sourceforge.net

Downloads:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/qmidictl/files
- source tarball:
http://download.sf.net/qmidictl/qmidictl-0.4.0.tar.gz
- source package:
http://download.sf.net/qmidictl/qmidictl-0.4.0-8.rncbc.suse.src.rpm
- binary packages:
http://download.sf.net/qmidictl/qmidictl-0.4.0-8.rncbc.suse.i586.rpm
http://download.sf.net/qmidictl/qmidictl-0.4.0-8.rncbc.suse.x86_84.rpm

Git repos:
http://git.code.sf.net/p/qmidictl/code
https://github.com/rncbc/qmidictl

Change-log:
- Added application keywords to freedesktop.org's AppData.

License:
QmidiCtl [5] is free, open-source Linux Audio [12] software,
distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL [13])
version 2 or later.


**QmidiNet - A MIDI Network Gateway via UDP/IP Multicast [6]**

QmidiNet 0.4.0 (spring'16) released!

QmidiNet [6] is a MIDI network gateway application that sends and
receives MIDI data (ALSA-MIDI [9] and JACK-MIDI [8]) over the network,
using UDP/IP multicast. Inspired by multimidicast and designed to be
compatible with ipMIDI for Windows.

Website:
http://qmidinet.sourceforge.net

Downloads:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/qmidinet/files
- source tarball:
http://download.sf.net/qmidinet/qmidinet-0.4.0.tar.gz
- source package:
http://download.sf.net/qmidinet/qmidinet-0.4.0-9.rncbc.suse.src.rpm
- binary packages:
http://download.sf.net/qmidinet/qmidinet-0.4.0-9.rncbc.suse.i586.rpm
http://download.sf.net/qmidinet/qmidinet-0.4.0-9.rncbc.suse.x86_84.rpm

Git repos:
http://git.code.sf.net/p/qmidinet/code
https://github.com/rncbc/qmidinet

Change-log:
- Allegedly fixed for the socketopt(IP_MULTICAST_LOOP) reverse semantics
on Windows platforms (as suggested by Paul Davis, from Ardour ipMIDI
implementation, thanks).
- Added application keywords to freedesktop.org's AppData.

License:
QmidiNet [6] is free, open-source Linux Audio [12] software,
distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL [13])
version 2 or later.


References:

[1] QjackCtl - A JACK Audio Connection Kit Qt GUI Interface
http://qjackctl.sourceforge.net

[2] Qsynth - A fluidsynth Qt GUI Interface
http://qsynth.sourceforge.net

[3] Qsampler - A LinuxSampler Qt GUI Interface
http://qsampler.sourceforge.net

[4] QXGEdit - A Qt XG Editor
http://qxgedit.sourceforge.net

[5] QmidiCtl - A MIDI Remote Controller via UDP/IP Multicast
http://qmidictl.sourceforge.net

[6] QmidiNet - A MIDI Network Gateway via UDP/IP Multicast
http://qmidinet.sourceforge.net

[7] Qt framework, C++ class library and tools for
cross-platform application and UI development
http://qt.io/

[8] JACK Audio Connection Kit
http://jackaudio.org

[9] ALSA, Advanced Linux Sound Architecture
http://www.alsa-project.org/

[10] FluidSynth - A SoundFont Synthesizer
A real-time software synthesizer based on SoundFont 2 specifications
http://www.fluidsynth.org

[11] LinuxSampler - The Linux Sampler Project
A modular, streaming capable, realtime audio sampler
http://www.linuxsampler.org

[12] Linux Audio consortium of libre software for audio-related work
http://linuxaudio.org

[13] GPL - GNU General Public License
http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/gpl.html

[14] miniLAC2016@c-base.org Berlin
miniLAC is a compact, community-driven version of the Linux Audio
Conference
http://minilac.linuxaudio.org/
http://lac.linuxaudio.org/


See also:
http://www.rncbc.org/drupal/node/1026


Enjoy && keep the fun, always!
--
rncbc aka. Rui Nuno Capela
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by rncbc.org at April 05, 2016 09:10 PM

OpenAV

miniLAC 2016!

miniLAC 2016!

Hey, its miniLAC this weekend! Are you near Berlin? You should attend, latest and greatest LinuxAudio demos, software, and meet the community! Checkout the schedule here, OpenAV is running a workshop on Fabla2 – showcasing the advanced features of Fabla2, making it suitable for live-performance, studio grade drums, and lots of fun with the new hardware integration for the Maschine… Read more →

by harry at April 05, 2016 07:35 PM

rncbc.org

Qtractor 0.7.6 - A Hazier Photon is released!


Hey, Spring'16 release frenzy isn't over as of just yet ;)

Keeping up with the tradition,

Qtractor 0.7.6 (a hazier photon) is released!

Qtractor is an audio/MIDI multi-track sequencer application written in C++ with the Qt framework. Target platform is Linux, where the Jack Audio Connection Kit (JACK) for audio and the Advanced Linux Sound Architecture (ALSA) for MIDI are the main infrastructures to evolve as a fairly-featured Linux desktop audio workstation GUI, specially dedicated to the personal home-studio.

Flattr this

Website:

http://qtractor.sourceforge.net

Project page:

http://sourceforge.net/projects/qtractor

Downloads:

http://sourceforge.net/projects/qtractor/files

Git repos:

http://git.code.sf.net/p/qtractor/code
https://github.com/rncbc/qtractor

Change-log:

  • Plug-ins search path and out-of-process (aka. dummy) VST plug-in inventory scanning has been heavily refactored.
  • Fixed and optimized all dummy processing for plugins with more audio inputs and/or outputs than channels on a track or bus where it's inserted.
  • Fixed relative/absolute path mapping when saving/loading custom LV2 Plug-in State Presets.

Wiki (on going, help wanted!):

http://sourceforge.net/p/qtractor/wiki/

License:

Qtractor is free, open-source Linux Audio software, distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL) version 2 or later.

 

Enjoy && Keep the fun, always.

by rncbc at April 05, 2016 06:30 PM

The Qstuff* Spring'16 Release Frenzy

On the wake of the miniLAC2016@c-base.org Berlin, and keeping up with tradition, the most venerable of the Qstuff* are under so called Spring'16 release frenzy.

Enjoy the party!

Details are as follows...

 

QjackCtl - JACK Audio Connection Kit Qt GUI Interface

QjackCtl 0.4.2 (spring'16) released!

QjackCtl is a(n ageing but still) simple Qt application to control the JACK sound server, for the Linux Audio infrastructure.

Website:
http://qjackctl.sourceforge.net
Downloads:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/qjackctl/files

Git repos:

http://git.code.sf.net/p/qjackctl/code
https://github.com/rncbc/qjackctl

Change-log:

  • Added a brand new "Enable JACK D-BUS interface" option, split from the old common "Enable D-BUS interface" setup option which now refers to its own self D-BUS interface exclusively.
  • Dropped old "Start minimized to system tray" option from setup.
  • Add double-click action (toggle start/stop) to systray (a pull request by Joel Moberg, thanks).
  • Added application keywords to freedesktop.org's AppData.
  • System-tray icon context menu has been fixed/hacked to show up again on Plasma 5 (aka. KDE5) notification status area.
  • Switched column entries in the unified interface device combo-box to make it work for macosx/coreaudio again.
  • Blind fix to a FTBFS on macosx/coreaudio platforms, a leftover from the unified interface device selection combo-box inception, almost two years ago.
  • Prevent x11extras module from use on non-X11/Unix plaforms.
  • Late French (fr) translation update (by Olivier Humbert, thanks).

License:

QjackCtl is free, open-source Linux Audio software, distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL) version 2 or later.

Flattr this

 

Qsynth - A fluidsynth Qt GUI Interface

Qsynth 0.4.1 (spring'16) released!

Qsynth is a FluidSynth GUI front-end application written in C++ around the Qt framework using Qt Designer.

Website:
http://qsynth.sourceforge.net
Downloads:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/qsynth/files

Git repos:

http://git.code.sf.net/p/qsynth/code
https://github.com/rncbc/qsynth

Change-log:

  • Dropped old "Start minimized to system tray" option from setup.
  • CMake script lists update (patch by Orcan Ogetbil, thanks).
  • Added application keywords to freedesktop.org's AppData.
  • System-tray icon context menu has been fixed/hacked to show up again on Plasma 5 (aka. KDE5) notifications status area.
  • Prevent x11extras module from use on non-X11/Unix plaforms.
  • Messages standard output capture has been improved in both ways a non-blocking pipe may get.
  • Regression fix for invalid system-tray icon dimensions reported by some desktop environment frameworks.

License:

Qsynth is free, open-source Linux Audio software, distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL) version 2 or later.

Flattr this

 

Qsampler - A LinuxSampler Qt GUI Interface

Qsampler 0.4.0 (spring'16) released!

Qsampler is a LinuxSampler GUI front-end application written in C++ around the Qt framework using Qt Designer.

Website:
http://qsampler.sourceforge.net
Downloads:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/qsampler/files

Git repos:

http://git.code.sf.net/p/qsampler/code
https://github.com/rncbc/qsampler

Change-log:

  • Added application keywords to freedesktop.org's AppData.
  • Prevent x11extras module from use on non-X11/Unix plaforms.
  • Messages standard output capture has been improved again, now in both ways a non-blocking pipe may get.
  • Single/unique application instance control adapted to Qt5/X11.

License:

Qsampler is free, open-source Linux Audio software, distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL) version 2 or later.

Flattr this

 

QXGEdit - A Qt XG Editor

QXGEdit 0.4.0 (spring'16) released!

QXGEdit is a live XG instrument editor, specialized on editing MIDI System Exclusive files (.syx) for the Yamaha DB50XG and thus probably a baseline for many other XG devices.

Website:
http://qxgedit.sourceforge.net
Downloads:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/qxgedit/files

Git repos:

http://git.code.sf.net/p/qxgedit/code
https://github.com/rncbc/qxgedit

Change-log:

  • Prevent x11extras module from use on non-X11/Unix plaforms.
  • French (fr) translations update (by Olivier Humbert, thanks).
  • Fixed port on MIDI 14-bit controllers input caching.

License:

QXGEdit is free, open-source Linux Audio software, distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL) version 2 or later.

Flattr this

 

QmidiCtl - A MIDI Remote Controller via UDP/IP Multicast

QmidiCtl 0.4.0 (spring'16) released!

QmidiCtl is a MIDI remote controller application that sends MIDI data over the network, using UDP/IP multicast. Inspired by multimidicast (http://llg.cubic.org/tools) and designed to be compatible with ipMIDI for Windows (http://nerds.de). QmidiCtl has been primarily designed for the Maemo enabled handheld devices, namely the Nokia N900 and also being promoted to the Maemo Package repositories. Nevertheless, QmidiCtl may still be found effective as a regular desktop application as well.

Website:
http://qmidictl.sourceforge.net
Downloads:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/qmidictl/files

Git repos:

http://git.code.sf.net/p/qmidictl/code
https://github.com/rncbc/qmidictl

Change-log:

  • Added application keywords to freedesktop.org's AppData.

License:

QmidiCtl is free, open-source Linux Audio software, distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL) version 2 or later.

Flattr this

 

QmidiNet - A MIDI Network Gateway via UDP/IP Multicast

QmidiNet 0.4.0 (spring'16) released!

QmidiNet is a MIDI network gateway application that sends and receives MIDI data (ALSA-MIDI and JACK-MIDI) over the network, using UDP/IP multicast. Inspired by multimidicast and designed to be compatible with ipMIDI for Windows.

Website:
http://qmidinet.sourceforge.net
Downloads:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/qmidinet/files

Git repos:

http://git.code.sf.net/p/qmidinet/code
https://github.com/rncbc/qmidinet

Change-log:

  • Allegedly fixed for the socketopt(IP_MULTICAST_LOOP) reverse semantics on Windows platforms (as suggested by Paul Davis, from Ardour ipMIDI implementation, thanks).
  • Added application keywords to freedesktop.org's AppData.

License:

QmidiNet is free, open-source Linux Audio software, distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL) version 2 or later.

Flattr this

 

Enjoy && keep the fun, always!

by rncbc at April 05, 2016 05:30 PM

April 03, 2016

Pid Eins

Announcing systemd.conf 2016

Announcing systemd.conf 2016

We are happy to announce the 2016 installment of systemd.conf, the conference of the systemd project!

After our successful first conference 2015 we’d like to repeat the event in 2016 for the second time. The conference will take place on September 28th until October 1st, 2016 at betahaus in Berlin, Germany. The event is a few days before LinuxCon Europe, which also is located in Berlin this year. This year, the conference will consist of two days of presentations, a one-day hackfest and one day of hands-on training sessions.

The website is online now, please visit https://conf.systemd.io/.

Tickets at early-bird prices are available already. Purchase them at https://ti.to/systemdconf/systemdconf-2016.

The Call for Presentations will open soon, we are looking forward to your submissions! A separate announcement will be published as soon as the CfP is open.

systemd.conf 2016 is a organized jointly by the systemd community and kinvolk.io.

We are looking for sponsors! We’ve got early commitments from some of last year’s sponsors: Collabora, Pengutronix & Red Hat. Please see the web site for details about how your company may become a sponsor, too.

If you have any questions, please contact us at info@systemd.io.

by Lennart Poettering at April 03, 2016 10:00 PM

Midichlorians in the blood

Taking Back From Android



Android is an operating system developed by Google around the Linux kernel. It is not like any other Linux distribution, because not only many common subsystems have been replaced by other components, but also the user interface is radically different based on Java language running into a virtual machine called Dalvik.

An example of subsystem removed from the Linux kernel is the ALSA Sequencer, which is a key piece for MIDI input/output with routing and scheduling that makes Linux comparable in capabilities to Mac OSX for musical applications (for musicians, not whistlers) and years ahead of Microsoft Windows in terms of infrastructure. Android did not offer anything comparable until Android 6 (Marshmallow).

Another subsystem from userspace Linux not included in Android is PulseAudio. Instead, OpenSL ES that can be found on Android for digital audio output and input.

But Android also has some shining components. One of them is Sonivox EAS (originally created by Sonic Network, Inc.) released under the Apache 2 license, and the MIDI Synthesizer used by my VMPK for Android application to produce noise. Funnily enough, it provided some legal fuel to Oracle in its battle against Google, because of some Java binding sources that were included in the AOSP repositories. It is not particularly outstanding in terms of audio quality, but has the ability of providing real time wavetable GM synthesis without using external soundfont files, and consumes very little resources so it may be indicated for Linux projects on small embedded devices. Let's take it to Linux, then!

So the plan is: for the next Drumstick release, there will be a Drumstick-RT backend using Sonivox EAS. The audio output part is yet undecided, but for Linux will probably be PulseAudio. In the same spirit, for Mac OSX there will be a backend leveraging the internal Apple DLS synth. These backends will be available in addition to the current FluidSynth one, which provides very good quality, but uses expensive floating point DSP calculations and requires external soundfont files.

Meanwhile, I've published on GitHub this repository including a port of Sonivox EAS for Linux with ALSA Sequencer MIDI input and PulseAudio output. It also  depends on Qt5 and Drumstick. Enjoy!

Sonivox EAS for Linux and Qt:
https://github.com/pedrolcl/Linux-SonivoxEas

Related Android project:
https://github.com/pedrolcl/android/tree/master/NativeGMSynth

by Pedro Lopez-Cabanillas (noreply@blogger.com) at April 03, 2016 04:59 PM

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] Sonivox EAS ported to Linux from Android

Hi,

This project is a Linux MIDI Synth library based on the Sonivox EAS Synthesizer
published by Google on the Android Open Source Project. It is a real time GM
synthesizer without needing external soundfonts, using embedded samples instead. It
consumes very little resources, so it may be indicated in Linux projects for small
embedded devices.
The library uses ALSA Sequencer MIDI input and PulseAudio output. Complete
compile-time dependencies are:
* Qt5, http://www.qt.io/[1]
* Drumstick, for ALSA MIDI input. http://sourceforge.net/projects/drumstick/[2]
* PulseAudio, for audio output.
http://www.freedesktop.org/wiki/Software/PulseAudio/[3]
The project contains:
* cmdlnsynth: Command line sample program using the synthesizer library
* guisynth: GUI sample program using the synthesizer library
* libsvoxeas: The Linux synthesizer shared library, using ALSA Sequencer and
PulseAudio
* sonivox: The AOSP source files, with a qmake project file to compile and test
under QtCreator as a static library
Copyright (C) 2016 Pedro López-Cabanillas.

https://github.com/pedrolcl/Linux-SonivoxEas

Regards,
Pedro


--------
[1] http://www.qt.io/
[2] http://sourceforge.net/projects/drumstick/
[3] http://www.freedesktop.org/wiki/Software/PulseAudio/

by gmail.com at April 03, 2016 03:08 PM

[LAA] io GNU/Linux 2016.02 out

Hi :)


A new release of io GNU/Linux is available for downloads (32 and 64-bits)

Features:

* Fully configured system for live and/or install
* Kernels 4.4.6 and 4.4.6-rt
* Enlightenment e20 as window manager
* All sounds through Jack2
* Hundred of audio, graphics, video, internet, utilities and system programs.


Get it at http://io.gnu.linux.free.fr/

if the homepage goes slow for you, please check:
https://sourceforge.net/projects/io-gnu-linux


Feedbacks welcome, enjoy :)

MK
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by free.fr at April 03, 2016 10:26 AM

April 01, 2016

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] jalv.select released V0.7

jalv.select is a little (gtkmm2) GUI to select lv2 plugs from a list and
run them with jalv.

Features:
- select jalv interpreter from combo box,
- select LV2 plugin from list,
- select preset to load from menu
- search plugins by regex or plugin class,
- reload lilv world to catch new installed plugins or presets,
- load plugin with selected preset.
- minimize app to systray (global Hotkey SHIFT+ESCAPE)
- wake up app from systray (global Hotkey SHIFT+ESCAPE)
- left mouse click on systray to show or hide app
- right mouse click to show quit menu item

- command-line start-up options:

-s, --systray start minimized in systray
-H, --high=HIGH start with given high in pixel

- runtime options

echo 'quit' > /tmp/jalv.select.fifo$UID
echo 'show' > /tmp/jalv.select.fifo$UID
echo 'hide' > /tmp/jalv.select.fifo$UID
echo 'systray action' > /tmp/jalv.select.fifo$UID

- keyboard shortcuts

ALT+q or CTRL+q == quit
ALT+r or CTRL+r == refresh plugin list
ESCAPE == deselect preset menu
CTRL+w == hide (minimize to systray icon)
ENTER or SPACE == select
UP, DOWN == select plugin in list
PG_UP, PG_DOWN == scroll plugin list


Depends:
- lilv
- gtkmm-2.4
- Xlib


jalv.select is released into the public domain.

Thanks goes to Christopher Arndt for his continues feedback/suggestions.
So this release is about to archive a flawless desktop integration
within *any* desktop manager and making jalv.select accessible by
keyboard actions.

Check out Chris video here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RSRDbmTMA98

get the release tar ball here:
https://github.com/brummer10/jalv_select/releases/

get the development source here:
https://github.com/brummer10/jalv_select/tree/master


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by web.de at April 01, 2016 10:16 AM

March 31, 2016

digital audio hacks – Hackaday

The ATtiny MIDI Plug Synth

MIDI was created over thirty years ago to connect electronic instruments, synths, sequencers, and computers together. Of course, this means MIDI was meant to be used with computers that are now thirty years old, and now even the tiniest microcontrollers have enough processing power to take a MIDI signal and create digital audio. [mitxela]’s polyphonic synth for the ATtiny 2313 does just that, using only two kilobytes of Flash and fitting inside a MIDI jack.

Putting a MIDI synth into a MIDI plug is something we’ve seen a few times before. In fact, [mitxela] did the same thing a few months ago with an ATtiny85, and [Jan Ostman]’s DSP-G1 does the same thing with a tiny ARM chip. Building one of these with an ATtiny2313 is really pushing the envelope, though. With only 2 kB of Flash memory and 128 bytes of RAM, there’s not a lot of space in this chip. Making a polyphonic synth plug is even harder.

The circuit for [mitxela]’s chip is extremely simple, with power and MIDI data provided by a MIDI keyboard, a 20 MHz crystal, and audio output provided eight digital pins summed with a bunch of resistors. Yes, this is only a square wave synth, and the polyphony is limited to eight channels. It works, as the video below spells out.

Is it a good synth? No, not really. By [mitxela]’s own assertion, it’s not a practical solution to anything, the dead bug construction takes an hour to put together, and the synth itself is limited to square waves with some ugly quantization, at that. It is a neat exercise in developing unique audio devices and especially hackey, making it a very cool build. And it doesn’t sound half bad.


Filed under: ATtiny Hacks, digital audio hacks, musical hacks

by Brian Benchoff at March 31, 2016 05:00 AM

blog4

March 30, 2016

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] Drumgizmo 0.9.10 released

We're proud to announce the immediate availability of DrumGizmo version
0.9.10!

DrumGizmo is an open source, multichannel, multilayered,
cross-platform drum plugin and stand-alone application. It enables you
to compose drums in midi and mix them with a multichannel approach. It
is comparable to that of mixing a real drumkit that has been recorded
with a multimic setup.

This is a bugfix release fixing two major bugs:
- Resampler now works when using DrumGizmo as a plugin.
- LV2 plugin no longer freezes on tempo changes.

Download it from http://www.drumgizmo.org

Visit us at the official irc channel at the Freenode network. Channel
name #DrumGizmo. We would love to hear from you!

// The DrumGizmo team
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by aasimon.org at March 30, 2016 08:12 AM

March 29, 2016

GStreamer News

GStreamer Core, Plugins, RTSP Server, Editing Services, Validate 1.8.0 stable release (binaries)

Pre-built binary images of the 1.8.0 stable release of GStreamer are now available for Windows 32/64-bit, iOS and Mac OS X and Android.

The builds are available for download from: Android, iOS, Mac OS X and Windows.

March 29, 2016 10:00 AM

March 28, 2016

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] compose is out

Hi everyone!
just a short mail to tell you about my little program
to study tonal music: compose.
There is an X11 user interface and it's mostly
keyboard-centric.
There is alsa midi output.
It's very small and very basic.
The documentation is, ahem, well, the main thing you
need to know is that there are two main edition modes
and you switch between them with the escape key. For
the rest, go read the source! (what? Sed it's 2016!!
be serious man!!) (yeah yeah, but you know, LAZINESS!)
(I will write some documentation at some point, I just
feel very very lazy these days, I mean weeks, well okay
months.)
That thing is functional for me, probably not for anyone
else but I feel like I want to announce about it. You
know, the "spirit", freedom, and so on. To hell with
"professional" software! Let's take back the control
of our computers and write basic software that just
work(tm) and are SMALL and ELEGANT, for hell's sake!
And for whatever reason I am not satisfied at all
with all this "notation editor" business or whatever
it's called. Not. At. All.
Anyway, it's at http://sed.free.fr/compose
It will never be finished, for are there software
out there that are finished? Let's also get rid of
that release thing, this is totally meaningless.
Let's go raw!
Happy classic music everyone!
Time for my pills.
Cédric.
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by free.fr at March 28, 2016 06:17 PM

March 27, 2016

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

Petigor's Tale used Audacity for sound recording

Petigor's Tale used Audacity for sound recording

When the authors of Petigor's Tale, a game developed using Blend4Web, wanted to record and edit sound effects for their upcoming game, their choice fell on Audacity.

Read their detailed blog entry about how the editing and recording was made.

by admin at March 27, 2016 08:38 PM

March 26, 2016

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

DrumGizmo version 0.9.9

DrumGizmo version 0.9.9

DrumGizmo version 0.9.9 is just out!

Highlighted changes / fixes:

  • Switch to LGPLv3
  • Linux VST
  • Embedded UI
  • Prepped for diskstreaming (but not yet implemented in UI)
  • Loads of bug fixes

Read the ChangeLog file for the full list of changes

by yassinphilip at March 26, 2016 06:20 PM

March 24, 2016

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] Drumgizmo 0.9.9 released

We're proud to announce the immediate availability of DrumGizmo version
0.9.9!

Highlighted changes / fixes:
- Switch to LGPLv3
- Linux VST
- Embedded UI
- Prepped for diskstreaming (but not yet implemented in UI)
- Loads of bug fixes

Read the ChangeLog for the full list of changes

Download it from http://www.drumgizmo.org

Visit us at the official irc channel at the Freenode network. Channel
name #DrumGizmo. We would love to hear from you!

// The DrumGizmo team
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by aasimon.org at March 24, 2016 02:14 PM

GStreamer News

GStreamer Core, Plugins, RTSP Server, Editing Services, Python, Validate, VAAPI 1.8.0 stable release

The GStreamer team is proud to announce a new major feature release in the stable 1.x API series of your favourite cross-platform multimedia framework!

This release has been in the works for half a year and is packed with new features, bug fixes and other improvements.

See /releases/1.8/ for the full list of changes.

Binaries for Android, iOS, Mac OS X and Windows will be provided shortly after the source release by the GStreamer project during the stable 1.8 release series.

Check out the release notes for GStreamer core, gst-plugins-base, gst-plugins-good, gst-plugins-ugly, gst-plugins-bad, gst-libav, gst-rtsp-server, gst-python, gst-editing-services, gst-validate, or gstreamer-vaapi, or download tarballs for gstreamer, gst-plugins-base, gst-plugins-good, gst-plugins-ugly, gst-plugins-bad, gst-libav, gst-rtsp-server, gst-python, gst-editing-services, gst-validate, or gstreamer-vaapi.

March 24, 2016 10:00 AM

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

AV Linux 2016: The Release

AV Linux 2016: The Release

With this release, Glen is moving away from the 'everything but the kitchen sink' approach and instead is focusing on providing a very stable base suitable for low latency audio production.

by yassinphilip at March 24, 2016 05:43 AM

March 23, 2016

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] Zynaddsubfx 2.5.4 - The "Alambradas" Release

ZynAddSubFX 2.5.4 - The "Alambradas" Release
Another release already?! Why yes! After many reports were received on
the officially supported VST & LV2 plugin versions, the bugs discovered
were systematically sought and destroyed. The result, code-named
"Alambradas" is a better, more reliable, ready-to-plug-in Zyn.


FEATURES
- Add realtime automation for subnote parameters
- Add FLTK UI for LV2 plugins - (no more requirement for NTK)
- Add support for '~' in bank paths
- Fix VST crashes
- Fix VST loading issues
- Fix Microtonal copy/paste
- Fix GCC 5.3.0 build issues
- Fix autosave disable flag
- Fix license headers
- Fix plugin library directory
- Fix uninitialized filter bug in subnote
- Fix broken instrument send



And here's the contribution score card by number of commits since 2.5.3:
(57efbd)
22 Mark McCurry
18 Filipe Coelho
3 Christopher A. Oliver
2 Olivier Jolly

Big thanks to them and we hope to see more feedback from all!

Now go make some noise!
--Team Zyn.

Project Page:
http://zynaddsubfx.sf.net/

Download:
https://sourceforge.net/projects/zynadd ... bfx/2.5.4/

Mailing List:
https://sourceforge.net/p/zynaddsubfx/mailman/

Forums:
viewforum.php?fG

Bug/Feature Tracker:
https://sourceforge.net/p/zynaddsubfx/b ... rce=navbar

IRC:
##zynaddsubfx on FreeNode

by gmail.com at March 23, 2016 03:58 PM

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

Ardour 4.7 released

Ardour 4.7 released

Ardour 4.7 is now available, including a variety of improvements and minor bug fixes. The two most significant changes are:

by yassinphilip at March 23, 2016 11:02 AM

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] jalv.select released V0.5

jalv.select is a little (gtkmm2) GUI to select lv2 plugs from a list and
run them with jalv.

it features:

* search LV2 plugins by regex or by plugin class
* select a LV2 plugin from a ascending sorted list
* select a preset to load
* select the jalv interpreter
* run LV2 plugin with selected preset in jalv
* reload lilv world to catch new installed plugins and presets,
* minimize app to systray icon


jalv.select is released into the public domain.

get the release tar ball here:
https://github.com/brummer10/jalv_select/releases/tag/V0.5

get the development source here:
https://github.com/brummer10/jalv_select/tree/master


_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-announce mailing list
Linux-audio-announce@lists.linuxaudio.org
http://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-announce

by web.de at March 23, 2016 07:40 AM

Linux Audio Users & Musicians Video Blog

Come Around – Evergreen

This is a music video of a song recorded/mixed/mastered using Linux
(AV Linux 2016) with Harrison Mixbus 3.1 along with some Calf and linuxDSP
Plugins. This is also the first production from our new ‘Bandshed’ studio
and will be released as part of a full EP in a month or so. The band
‘Evergreen’ is the band my son drums in and ‘Come Around’ is an original
song written by the singer.



by DJ Kotau at March 23, 2016 07:04 AM

March 22, 2016

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

Qtractor 0.7.5 (hazy photon) is out!

Qtractor 0.7.5 (hazy photon) is out!

Qtractor, the audio/MIDI multi-track sequencer, has reached the 0.7.5 milestone!!


Highlights for this dot/beta release:

by yassinphilip at March 22, 2016 03:03 AM

March 21, 2016

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

Building SuperCollider 3.7.0 from Source (Debian)

Building SuperCollider 3.7.0 from Source (Debian)

A few months ago we published an introduction to the audio programming language SuperCollider here on LMP.  With the recent announcement that SuperCollider had reached 3.7.0, we Debian Linux users suddenly find ourselves behind-the-times regarding our SuperCollider packages which are likely to be at 3.6.6 for some time.  If you want 3.7.0 now (or any bleeding edge version in the future) you have no choice but to build it from source.

by Scott Petersen at March 21, 2016 08:53 PM

rncbc.org

Qtractor 0.7.5 - The Hazy Photon is out!

Hello everybody!

Qtractor 0.7.5 (hazy photon) is out!

It comes with one top recommendation though: please update, at once, while it's hot! :)

Highlights for this dot/beta release:

  • Overlapping clips cross-fade (NEW)
  • MIDI Send/Return and Aux-Send insert plugins (NEW)
  • Generic and custom track icons eye-candy (NEW)

Some other interesting points may be found in the blunt and misty change-log below.

And just in case you missed it before,

Qtractor is an audio/MIDI multi-track sequencer application written in C++ with the Qt framework. Target platform is Linux, where the Jack Audio Connection Kit (JACK) for audio and the Advanced Linux Sound Architecture (ALSA) for MIDI are the main infrastructures to evolve as a fairly-featured Linux desktop audio workstation GUI, specially dedicated to the personal home-studio.

Change-log:

  • Beat unit divisor, aka. the denominator or lower numeral in the time-signature, have now a visible and practical effect over the time-line, even though the standard MIDI tempo(BPM) is always denoted in beats as quarter-notes (1/4, crotchet, seminima) per minute.
  • Fixed an old hack on LV2 State Files abstract/relative file-path mapping when saving custom LV2 Presets (after a related issue on Fabla2, by Harry Van Haaren, thanks).
  • Default PC-Keyboard shortcuts may now be erasable and re-assigned (cf. Help/Shortcuts...).
  • New option on the audio/MIDI export dialog, on whether to add/import the exported result as brand new track(s).
  • Introducing brand new track icons property
  • Old Dry/Wet Insert and Aux-send pseudo-plugin parameters are now split into separate Dry and Wet controls, what else could it possibly be? :)
  • Brand new MIDI Insert and Aux-Send pseudo-plugins are now implemented with very similar semantics as the respective and existing audio counterparts.
  • Implement LV2_STATE__loadDefaultState feature (after pull request by Hanspeter Portner aka. ventosus, thanks).
  • Plug-ins search paths internal logic has been refactored; an alternative file-name based search is now in effect for LADSPA, DSSI and VST plug-ins, whenever not found on their original file-path locations saved in a previous session.
  • Finally added this brand new menu Clip/Cross Fade command, aimed on setting fade-in/out ranges properly, just as far to (auto)cross-fade consecutive overlapping clips.

Enjoy && Keep the fun, always.

Flattr this

Website:

http://qtractor.sourceforge.net

Project page:

http://sourceforge.net/projects/qtractor

Downloads:

http://sourceforge.net/projects/qtractor/files

Git repos:

http://git.code.sf.net/p/qtractor/code
https://github.com/rncbc/qtractor

Wiki (on going, help wanted!):

http://sourceforge.net/p/qtractor/wiki/

License:

Qtractor is free, open-source Linux Audio software, distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL) version 2 or later.

Enjoy && Keep the fun, always.

by rncbc at March 21, 2016 08:00 PM

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

SuperCollider 3.7.0 Released

SuperCollider 3.7.0, over two years in the making, has finally been released!  Additions and fixes include (from the News in 3.7 help file):

by Scott Petersen at March 21, 2016 07:33 PM

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] Qtractor 0.7.5 - The Hazy Photon is out!

Hello everybody!

Qtractor 0.7.5 (hazy photon) is out!

It comes with one top recommendation though: please update, at once,
while it's hot! :)

Highlights for this dot/beta release:

* Overlapping clips cross-fade (NEW)
* MIDI Send/Return and Aux-Send insert plugins (NEW)
* Generic and custom track icons eye-candy (NEW)

Some other interesting points may be found in the blunt and misty
change-log below.

And just in case you missed it before,

Qtractor [1] is an audio/MIDI multi-track sequencer application
written in C++ with the Qt framework [2]. Target platform is Linux,
where the Jack Audio Connection Kit (JACK [3]) for audio and the
Advanced Linux Sound Architecture (ALSA [4]) for MIDI are the main
infrastructures to evolve as a fairly-featured Linux desktop audio
workstation GUI, specially dedicated to the personal home-studio.

Change-log (since last tacky release):
- Beat unit divisor, aka. the denominator or lower numeral in the
time-signature, have now a visible and practical effect over the
time-line, even though the standard MIDI tempo(BPM) is always denoted in
beats as quarter-notes (1/4, crotchet, seminima) per minute.
- Fixed an old hack on LV2 State Files abstract/relative file-path
mapping when saving custom LV2 Presets (after a related issue on Fabla2,
by Harry Van Haaren, thanks).
- Default PC-Keyboard shortcuts may now be erasable and re-assigned (cf.
Help/Shortcuts...).
- New option on the audio/MIDI export dialog, on whether to add/import
the exported result as brand new track(s).
- Introducing brand new track icons property.
- Old Dry/Wet Insert and Aux-send pseudo-plugin parameters are now split
into separate Dry and Wet controls, what else could it possibly be? :)
- Brand new MIDI Insert and Aux-Send pseudo-plugins are now implemented
with very similar semantics as the respective and existing audio
counterparts.
- Implement LV2_STATE__loadDefaultState feature (after pull request by
Hanspeter Portner aka. ventosus, thanks).
- Plug-ins search paths internal logic has been refactored; an
alternative file-name based search is now in effect for LADSPA, DSSI and
VST plug-ins, whenever not found on their original file-path locations
saved in a previous session.
- Finally added this brand new menu Clip/Cross Fade command, aimed on
setting fade-in/out ranges properly, just as far to (auto)cross-fade
consecutive overlapping clips.

Website:
http://qtractor.sourceforge.net

Project page:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/qtractor

Downloads:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/qtractor/files

- source tarball:
http://download.sf.net/qtractor/qtractor-0.7.5.tar.gz

- source package (openSUSE Tumbleweed):
http://download.sf.net/qtractor/qtractor-0.7.5-23.rncbc.suse.src.rpm

- binary packages (openSUSE Tumbleweed):
http://download.sf.net/qtractor/qtractor-0.7.5-23.rncbc.suse.i586.rpm
http://download.sf.net/qtractor/qtractor-0.7.5-23.rncbc.suse.x86_84.rpm

Git repos:
http://git.code.sf.net/p/qtractor/code
https://github.com/rncbc/qtractor

Wiki (on going, help wanted!):
http://sourceforge.net/p/qtractor/wiki/

Weblog (on going, upstream support):
http://www.rncbc.org

License:
Qtractor [1] is free, open-source Linux Audio [5] software,
distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL [6])
version 2 or later.

References:

[1] Qtractor - An audio/MIDI multi-track sequencer
http://qtractor.sourceforge.net

[2] Qt framework, C++ class library and tools for
cross-platform application and UI development
http://qt.io/

[3] JACK Audio Connection Kit
http://jackaudio.org

[4] ALSA, Advanced Linux Sound Architecture
http://www.alsa-project.org/

[5] Linux Audio consortium of libre software for audio-related work
http://linuxaudio.org

[6] GPL - GNU General Public License
http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/gpl.html

See also:
http://www.rncbc.org/drupal/node/1022


Enjoy && Keep the fun, always.
--
rncbc aka. Rui Nuno Capela
_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-announce mailing list
Linux-audio-announce@lists.linuxaudio.org
http://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-announce

by rncbc.org at March 21, 2016 05:02 PM

March 20, 2016

OpenAV

New Web Host

New Web Host

Hey! Have you noticed OpenAV looks a little fresh again? Yep, we’ve moved to a sparkly new server. Why? Mostly due to a bug in the older server (backstory) which was extremely hard to fix. We’ve migrated to another, and things should be all rosy from now on. Any downtime, please report to our webmaster directly – harryhaaren@gmail.com. Now onwards… Read more →

by harry at March 20, 2016 09:56 PM

March 19, 2016

digital audio hacks – Hackaday

Tombstone Brings New Life to Board

Making revisions to existing PCBs with surface mount components often leads to creative solutions, and this insertion of a switch over a tombstoned resistor is no exception. According to [kubatyszko], “this is an FPGA-based Amiga clone. R15 serves as joint-stereo mixing signal between channels to make it easier on headphone users (Amiga has 4 channels, 2 left and 2 right). Removing R15 makes the stereo 100% ‘original’ with fully independent channels. Didn’t want to make it permanent so I decided to put a switch.”

Whether [kubatyszko] intends it or not, this solution is not going to be permanent without some additional work to mechanically secure the switch. We’ve tried this sort of thing before and it sometimes results in the contact area of the resistor being ripped off the substrate and separated from the rest of the resistor, rendering it useless. However, the creative use of the pads to get some additional functionality out of the board deserves some kudos.

We love creative fixes for board problems but it’s been a really long time since we’ve seen several of them collected in one place. We’d love to hear your favorite tricks so let us know in the comments below.


Filed under: digital audio hacks, misc hacks

by Bob Baddeley at March 19, 2016 11:01 AM

March 18, 2016

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

New Guitarix preset from Sebastian Posch

Sebastian Posch, Guitarix user extra-ordinaire, has released some new videos.

First out is his "Dope: Stoner/Doom Metal Preset for Guitarix":

And while you are at it, why not check out his guitar lesson about string skipping:

by admin at March 18, 2016 07:14 PM

March 16, 2016

Talk Unafraid

The Investigatory Powers Bill for architects and administrators

OK, it’s not the end of the world. But it does change things radically, should it pass third reading in its current form. There is, right now, an opportunity to effect some change to the bill in committee stage, and I urge you to read it and the excellent briefings from Liberty and the Open Rights Group and others and to write to your MP.

Anyway. What does this change in our threat models and security assessments? What aspects of security validation and testing do we need to take more seriously? I’m writing this from my perspective, which is from a small ISP systems perspective, but this contains my personal views, not that of my employer, yada yada.

The threats

First up let’s look at what the government can actually do under this bill. I’m going to try and abstract things a little from the text in the bill, but essentially they can:

  • Issue a technical capability notice, which can compel the organization to make technical changes to provide capability to provide a service to government
  • Compel an individual (not necessarily within your organization) to access data
  • Issue a retention notice, which can compel the organization to store data and make it available through some mechanism
  • Covertly undertake equipment interference (potentially with the covert, compelled assistance of someone in the organization, potentially in bulk)

Assuming we’re handling some users’ data, and want to protect their privacy and security as their bits transit the network we operate, what do we now need to consider?

  • We can’t trust any individual internally
  • We can’t trust any small group of individuals fully
  • We can’t trust the entire organization not to become compromised
  • We must assume that we are subject to attempts at equipment interference
  • We must assume that we may be required to retain more data than we need to

So we’re going to end up with a bigger threat surface and more attractors for external threats (all that lovely data). We’ve got to assume individuals may be legally compelled to act against the best interests of the company’s users – this is something any organization has to consider a little bit, but we’ve always been viewing this from a perspective of angry employees the day they quit and so on. We can’t even trust that small groups are not compromised and may either transfer sensitive data or assist in compromise of equipment

Beyond that, we have to consider what happens if an organizational notice is made – what if we’re compelled to retain none-sampled flow data, or perform deep packet inspection and retain things like HTTP headers? How should we defend against all of this, from the perspective of keeping our users safe?

Motivation

To be clear – I am all for targeted surveillance. I believe strongly we should have well funded, smart people in our intelligence services, and that they should operate in a legal fashion, with clear laws that are up to date and maintained. I accept that no society with functional security services will have perfect privacy.

I don’t think the IPB is the right solution, mind you, but this is all to say that there will always be some need for targeted surveillance and equipment interference. These should be conducted only when a warrant is issued (preferably by a judge and cabinet minister), and ISPs should indeed be legally able to assist in these cases, which requires some loss of security and privacy for those targeted users – and it should be only those users.

I am a paid-up member of the Open Rights Group, Liberty and the Electronic Frontiers Foundation. I also regularly attend industry events in the tech sector and ISP sector in particular. Nobody wants to stop our spies from spying where there’s a clear need for them to do so.

However, as with all engineering, it’s a matter of tradeoffs. Bulk equipment interference or bulk data retention is complete overkill and helps nobody. Covert attacks on UK infrastructure actively weaken our security. So how do we go about building a framework that permits targeted data retention and equipment interference in a secure manner?  Indeed, encourages it at an organizational level rather than forcing it to occur in a covert manner?

Equipment Interference

This is the big one, really. Doesn’t matter how it happens – internally compelled employee, cleaner plugging a USB stick from a vague but menacing government agency into a server and rebooting it, switches having their bootloaders flashed with new firmware as they’re shipped to you, or covert network intrusion. Either way you end up in a situation where what your routers, switches, servers etc are doing things you did not expect, almost certainly without your knowledge.

This makes it practically impossible to ensure they are secure, against any threats. Sure, your Catalyst claims to be running IOS 13.2.1. Your MX-series claims to be running JunOS 15.1. Can we verify this? Maybe. We can use host-based intrusion detection systems to monitor integrity and raise alarms.

Now, proper auditing and logging and monitoring of all these devices, coupled with change management etc will catch most of the mundane approaches – that’s just good infosec, and we have to do that to catch all the criminals, script kiddies and random bots trawling the net for vulnerable hosts. Where it gets interesting is how you protect against the sysadmin themselves.

It feels like we need to start implementing m-in-n authorization to perform tasks around sensitive hosts and services. Some stuff we should be able to lock down quite firmly. Reconfiguring firewalls outside of the managed, audited process for doing so using a configuration management (CM) tool? Clearly no need for this, so why should anyone ever be able to do it? All services in CM, be it Puppet/Salt/Chef, with strongly guarded git and puppet repositories and strong authentication everywhere (keys, proper CA w/ signing for CM client/server auth, etc)? Then why would admins ever need to log into machines? Except inevitably someone does  need to, and they’ll need root to diagnose whatever’s gone wrong, even if the fix is in CM eventually.

We can implement 2-person or even 3-person authentication quite easily, even at small scales, using physical tools – hardware security modules locked in 2-key safes, or similar. But it’s cumbersome and complicated, and doesn’t work for small scales where availability is a concern – is the on-call team now 3 people, and are they all in the office all the time with their keys?

There’s a lot that could be done to improve that situation in low to medium security environments, to stop the simple attacks, to improve the baseline for operational security, and crucially to surface any covert attempts at EI conducted by an individual or from outside, covertly. Organizationally, it’d be best for everyone if the organization were aware of modifications that were required to their equipment.

From a security perspective, a technical capability notice or data retention notice of some sort issued to the company or group of people at least means that a discussion can be had internally. The organization may well be able to assist in minimising collateral damage. Imagine: “GCHQ needs to look at detailed traffic for this list of 10 IPs in an investigation? Okay, stick those subscribers in a separate VLAN once they hit the edge switches, route that through the core here and perform the extra logging here for just that VLAN and they’ve got it! Nobody else gets logged!” rather than “hey, why is this Juniper box suddenly sending a few Mbps from its management interface to some IP in Gloucestershire? And does anyone know why the routing engines both restarted lately?”

Data Retention

This one’s actually pretty easy to think about. If it’s legally compelled by a retention or technical capability notice, you must retain as required, and store it as you would your own browser history – in a write-only secure enclave, with vetted staff, ISO27K1 compliant processes (plus whatever CESG requires), complete and utter segmentation from the rest of the business, and whatever “request filter” the government requires stays in there with dedicated, highly monitored and audited connectivity.

What’s that, you say? The government is not willing to pay for all that? The overhead of such a store for most small ISPs (<100,000 customers) would be huge. We’re talking millions if not more per small ISP (ispreview.co.uk lists 237 ISPs in the UK). Substantial office space, probably 5 non-technical and 5 technical staff at minimum, a completely separate network, data diodes from the collection systems, collection systems themselves, redundant storage hardware, development and test environments, backups (offsite, of course – to your second highly secure storage facility), processing hardware for the request filter, and so on. Just the collection hardware might be half a million pounds of equipment for a small ISP. If the government start requiring CESG IL3 or higher, the costs keep going up. The code of practice suggests bulk data might just be held at OFFICIAL – SENSITIVE, though, so IL2 might be enough.

The biggest risk to organizations when it comes to data retention is that the government might not cover your costs – they’re certainly not required to. And of course the fact that you’re the one to blame if you don’t secure it properly and it gets leaked. And the fact that every hacker with dreams of identity theft in the universe now wants to hack you so bad, because you’ve just become a wonderfully juicy repository of information. If this info got out, even for a small ISP, and we’re talking personally-identifiable flow information/IP logs – which is what “Internet Connection Records” look/sound like, though they’re still not defined – then Ashley Madison, TalkTalk and every other “big data breach” would look hilariously irrelevant by comparison. Imagine what personal data you could extract from those 10,000 users at that small ISP! Imagine how many people’s personal lives you could utterly destroy, by outing them as gay, trans or HIV positive, or a thousand other things. All it would take is one tiny leak.

You can’t do anything to improve the security/privacy of your end users – at this point, you’re legally not allowed to stop collecting the data. Secure it properly and did I mention you should write to your MP while the IPB is at committee stage?

If you’ve not been served with a notice: carry on, business as usual, retain as little as possible to cover operational needs and secure it well.

Auditing

Auditing isn’t a thing that happens enough.

I always think that auditing is a huge missed opportunity. We do pair programming and code review in the software world, so why not do terminal session reviews? If X logs into a router, makes 10 changes and logs out, yes we can audit the config changes and do other stateful analysis, but we can audit those commands as a single session. It feels like there’s a tool missing to collate logs from something like syslog and bring them together as a session, and then expose that as a thing people can look over, review, and approve or flag for discussion.

It’s a nice way for people to learn, too – I’ve discovered so many useful tools from watching my colleagues hack away at a server, and about the only way I can make people feel comfortable working with SELinux is to walk them through the quite friendly tools.

Auditing in any case should become a matter of course. Tools like graylog2, ELK and a smorgasbord of others allow you to set up alerts or streams on log lines – start surfacing things like root logins, su/sudo usage, and “high risk” commands like firmware updates, logging configuration, and so on. Stick a display on your dashboards.

Auditing things that don’t produce nice auditable logs is of course more difficult – some firewalls don’t, some appliances don’t. Those just need to be replaced or wrapped in a layer that can be audited. Web interface with no login or command audit trail? Stick it behind a HTTPS proxy that does log, and pull out POSTs. Firewall with no logging capability? Bin it and put something that does in. Come on, it’s 2016.

Technical capability notices and the rest

This is the unfixable. If you get handed a TCN, you basically get to do what it says. You can appeal on the grounds of technical infeasibility, but not proportionality or anything like that. So short of radically decentralizing your infrastructure to make it technically too expensive for the government, you’re kind of stuck with doing what they say.

The law is written well enough to prevent obvious loopholes. If you’re an ISP, you might consider encryption – you could encrypt data at your CPEs, and decrypt it on your edge. You could go a step further and not decrypt it at all, but pass it to some other company you notionally operate extraterritorially, who decrypt it and then send it on its way from there. But these come with potentially huge cost, and in any case the TCN can require you to remove any protection you applied or are in a position to remove if practical.

We can harden infrastructure a little – things like using n-in-m models, DNScrypt for DNS lookups from CPEs, securely authenticating provisioning servers and so on. But there is no technical solution for a policy problem – absolutely any ISP, CSP, or 1-man startup in the UK is as powerless as the next if the government rocks up with a TCN requiring you to store all your customers’ data or to install these black boxes everywhere your aggregation layer connects to the core or whatever.

Effectively, then, the UK industry is powerless to prevent the government from doing whatever the hell it likes, regardless of security or privacy implications, to our networks, hardware and software. We can take some steps to mitigate covert threats or at least give us a better chance of finding them, and we can make some changes which attempt to mitigate against compelled (or hostile) actors internally – there’s an argument that says we should be doing this anyway.

And we can cooperate with properly-scoped targeted warrants. Law enforcement is full of good people, trying to do the right thing. But their views on what the right thing to do is must not dictate political direction and legal implementation while ignoring the technical realities. To do so is to doom the UK to many more years with a legal framework which does not reflect reality, and actively harms the security of millions of end users.

by James Harrison at March 16, 2016 09:49 PM

ardour

Reduced service, March 17th-29th

Starting on March 17th anybody who requires assistance with subscriptions, website registration and so forth will need to wait until the 29th. I (Paul) will be travelling and likely without any internet access during that time. I will survey emails when I get back, but older forum posts will not get scanned, so if you have an issue related to the those things, please send me mail (paul@linuxaudiosystems.com) rather than assume that a forum post will lead to action - it will not.

Friendly users and some developers will likely still answer other questions posted to the forums, so don't feel limited in that respect.

read more

by paul at March 16, 2016 03:32 PM

March 15, 2016

OSM podcast

GStreamer News

GStreamer Core, Plugins, RTSP Server, Editing Services, Python, Validate, VAAPI 1.8.0 release candidate 2 (1.7.91)

The GStreamer team is pleased to announce the second release candidate of the stable 1.8 release series. The 1.8 release series is adding new features on top of the 1.0, 1.2, 1.4 and 1.6 series and is part of the API and ABI-stable 1.x release series of the GStreamer multimedia framework.

Binaries for Android, iOS, Mac OS X and Windows will be provided separately during the stable 1.8 release series.

Check out the release notes for GStreamer core, gst-plugins-base, gst-plugins-good, gst-plugins-ugly, gst-plugins-bad, gst-libav, gst-rtsp-server, gst-python, gst-editing-services, gst-validate, or gstreamer-vaapi, or download tarballs for gstreamer, gst-plugins-base, gst-plugins-good, gst-plugins-ugly, gst-plugins-bad, gst-libav, gst-rtsp-server, gst-python, gst-editing-services, gst-validate, or gstreamer-vaapi.

March 15, 2016 01:00 PM

March 13, 2016

digital audio hacks – Hackaday

A Pi Powered Recording Studio

In the mid-90s, you recorded your band’s demo on a Tascam cassette tape deck. These surprisingly cheap four-track portable studios were just low tech enough to lend an air of authenticity to a band that calls itself, ‘something like Pearl Jam, but with a piano’. These tape decks disappeared a decade later, just like your dreams of being a rock star, replaced with portable digital recording studios.

The Raspberry Pi exists, the Linux audio stack is in much better shape than it was ten years ago, and now it’s possible to build your own standalone recording studio. That’s exactly what [Daniel] is doing for our Raspberry Pi Zero contest, and somewhat predictably he’s calling it the piStudio.

Although the technology has moved from cassette tapes to CompactFlash cards to hard drives, the design of these four-track mini recording studios hasn’t really changed since their introduction in the 1980s. There are four channels, each with a fader, balance, EQ, and a line in and XLR jack. There are master controls, a few VU meters, and if the technology is digital, a pair of MIDI jacks. Since [Daniel] is using a Raspberry Pi for this project, he threw in an LCD for a great user interface.

As with all digital recorders, the money is in the analog to digital converters. [Daniel] is using a 24-bit, 216kHz, four-channel chip, Texas Instruments’ PCM4204. That’s more than enough to confuse the ears of an audiophile, although that much data will require a hard drive. Good thing there will be SATA.

Although you can buy an eight-channel solid state recorder for a few hundred dollars – and [Daniel] will assuredly put more than that into this project, it’s a great application of a ubiquitous Linux computer for a device that’s very, very useful.


Raspberry_Pi_LogoSmall

The Raspberry Pi Zero contest is presented by Hackaday and Adafruit. Prizes include Raspberry Pi Zeros from Adafruit and gift cards to The Hackaday Store!
See All the Entries || Enter Your Project Now!


Filed under: digital audio hacks, Raspberry Pi

by Brian Benchoff at March 13, 2016 08:00 PM

March 11, 2016

ardour

Subscription/Payment Problems (Part 2)

There continue to be issues with our interactions with PayPal over the last several days. PayPal required some small changes to the way things work (good changes, that help with security), but they also changed some minor details that broke our payment processing system in subtle ways.

If you made a payment or tried to set up a subscription in the period March 8th - March 11th at about 15:30h UTC, and things did not work as you expected, please email me at paul@linuxaudiosystems.com and we'll make it right.

The problems are believed to be fixed now. Apologies for the errors and inconvenience.

read more

by paul at March 11, 2016 08:39 PM

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

MiniLAC Berlin 2016

linuxaudio  MiniLAC is a more compact, community-driven version of the yearly Linux Audio Conference.

A place to talk to developers of your favorite Linux (capable) audio software, music producers, developers coming together, thinking about the future shape of Linux Audio.

 

 

by yassinphilip at March 11, 2016 05:15 AM

DFasma 1.4.4 released

DFasma is a free open-source software which is used to compare audio files in time and frequency. The comparison is first visual, using wavforms and spectra. It is also possible to listen to time-frequency segments in order to allow perceptual comparison. It is basically dedicated to analysis. Even though there are basic functionnalities to align the signals in time and amplitude, this software does not aim to be an audio editor.

by yassinphilip at March 11, 2016 04:27 AM

March 10, 2016

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] DFasma 1.4.4 - A tool to analyse and compare audio files in time and frequency

Greetings,

I felt we lack a light, quick and efficient tool to compare waveforms.
DFasma is quite convenient for inspection of results of synthesis and
modification tasks on voice signals.

Homepage:
http://gillesdegottex.github.io/dfasma/

Downloads:
https://github.com/gillesdegottex/dfasma/releases

* Shows spectrogram, amplitude spectrum, phase spectrum and group delay.
* Can play a filtered sound given a selected frequency band.
* Rectification of the spectrogram tilt (cepstral lifting).
* Can create and edit fundamental frequency (F0) files (thanks to REAPER).
* Can create and edit segmentation files.
* Can load about 25 different audio formats (thanks to libsndfile).
* Everything runs under Linux, Mac OSX and Windows.

Have fun ! And any type of feedback is welcomed of course.

Cheers,
Gilles

by gmail.com at March 10, 2016 09:33 PM

March 09, 2016

open-source – cdm createdigitalmusic

Ableton just released every last detail of how Push 2 works

Wish granted, hackers. The full specification for Ableton’s Push 2 hardware is now online on GitHub, after passionate Live users clamored for its release. And there’s a lot. This isn’t just a MIDI specification (though that’s there). Every minute detail of how colors appear on LEDs gets covered. (The color “white” has its own section. Yeah, like that minute.) Every animation. The pixels that show up on the display. This isn’t just a guide to how to hack Push 2 – though it’s certainly that. It’s a technical bible on how Push 2 works.

Here, the easiest way to express this is actually to post the table of contents:

1. Introduction
1.1. Purpose
1.2. Architecture Overview
2. MIDI Interface
2.1. MIDI Interface Access
2.2. MIDI Messages
2.3. MIDI Mapping
2.4. Sysex Commands
2.4.1. General Command Format
2.4.2. Command List
2.5. MIDI Mode
2.6. LEDs
2.6.1. Setting LED Colors
2.6.2. RGB LED Color Processing
2.6.3. White LED Color Processing
2.6.4. Touch Strip LED Color Processing
2.6.5. Default Color Palettes
2.6.6. White Balance
2.6.7. Global LED Brightness
2.6.8. LED Animation
2.6.9. PWM Frequency
2.7. Buttons
2.8. Pads
2.8.1. Velocity Curve
2.8.2. Pad Parameters
2.8.3. Individual Pad Calibration
2.8.4. Aftertouch
2.9. Encoders
2.10. Touch Strip
2.10.1. Touch Strip Configuration
2.11. Pedals
2.11.1. Pedal Sampling
2.11.2. Pedal Configuration
2.12. Display Backlight
2.13. Device Inquiry
2.14. Statistics
3. Display Interface
3.1. USB Display Interface Access
3.2. Display Interface Protocol
3.2.1. Frame Header
3.2.2. Pixel Data
3.2.3. Pixel Color Encoding
3.2.4. XORing Pixel Data
3.2.5. Frame Buffering
3.2.6. Allocating Libusb Transfers
4. Appendix A: MIDI Implementation Chart

I imagine this could inspire a whole lot of different people.

1. For the curious, you can learn how Push 2 works, just by browsing. (I had a manual to the Space Shuttle as a kid; this is sort of like that for hardware controller fans.)

2. If you’re working on a Max for Live patch, you can now easily learn how to make even minor modifications and hacks.

3. Developers working on Push 2 controller support now can do all kinds of new things.

4. People wanting to use Push 2 with hardware other than Live now can go about that in more powerful ways (and that’s possible, too, because all of this works regardless of OS and host).

5. People designing their own DIY hardware can learn from what Ableton have done. Yes, heck, that includes competitors – but to be honest, those competitors probably could figure this out on their own. And, oh, by the way, competitors will also be under equal pressure to reciprocate, which is good for all of us.

It’s not really “open source” – Ableton owns everything you see here. It wouldn’t really make sense to modify, anyway, as it’s tied specifically to the Push 2 hardware. It’s more like public source – but that’s still a good thing.
https://github.com/Ableton/push-interface

I think it’s all intensely healthy. I’d still like to see an API on the side of the Live software that makes it easier to make modifications. But this is indisputably good news.

And since I really have no idea what people will do with it, let us know what you do intend to do with it – or share the results.

The post Ableton just released every last detail of how Push 2 works appeared first on cdm createdigitalmusic.

by Peter Kirn at March 09, 2016 06:27 PM

Google are giving away experiments to teach music and code

Technology’s record in the last century was often replacing music making with music consumption. But in this century, that might turn around. Google seems to hope so. Today, the company posted a set of free sound toys on its site, all running in your browser. They’re fun diversions for now – but thanks to open code and powerful new browser features, they could become more.

theremin

You’ve possibly come across the first experiment, available as a Google Doodle on the search engine’s homepage. In that, Clara Rockmore teaches you a simple melody on a simulated Theremin.

But there are more – and education is the apparent goal. Google says they’re assembling the so-called “Chrome Music Lab” in honor of “Music In Our Schools month.” The idea is to let you explore how music works.

musiclab

Perhaps more interesting than that, though, is how these experiments are delivered. By running in the browser, it’s possible to make lessons available instantly, anywhere – and to let you interact with them at your own pace.

“Chrome” is of course featured, but I found myself running experiments in Safari, too, without incident.

screenshot_267

The funny thing is, we’re now catching up to an idea that was already in proof of concept form some twenty years earlier. For example, Morton Subotnick may be known to most these days as a pioneer of composition and modular synthesis – and he is that – but in 1995, he did something very like these experiments. “Morton Subotnick’s Making Music” for Voyager included a series of interactive toys intended to allow kids to play with advanced music concepts quickly. Back then, the delivery mechanism was multimedia CD-ROM, requiring Mac and PC machines with particular specs to realize the content.

Apps, of course, did this (particularly on iOS) – and sure enough, there’s a Subotnick painting app for iPad from a few years ago. But the ability of the browser to catch up means the chance for the screen used for everything else to become musical.

Now, while kids might use the Chrome Music Lab to learn about music, coders might use it to learn about code. Each example is free and open source, so you can learn from it and modify it.

And the “lab” includes software built on key, open technologies. Sound is delivered via the Web Audio API. WebGL and PIXI.JS make powerful graphics and animation easier. There are also tools (Tone.js and a microphone API) that make adding sound functionality less of a chore.

Just click the question mark icon on any experiment, and you’ll find information on the developer and a link to code on GitHub.

There’s even a chance to teach code and music at once – for kids, too:
https://musiclab.chromeexperiments.com/Oscillators

I find it actually a bit curious that Google says these are collaborations between coders and musicians – of course, these days, there’s often no distinction. But I can imagine collaborations between coder-musicians, music educators, and more expanding around this. The browser could be a place where we mess with music and learn literacy in music, expression, code, and math.

And if you aren’t optimistic about that, well… uh… share this and likely just listen to all the coworkers / family members / coffee shop goers who are making strange Theremin sounds and dragged away from things like American Presidential politics. I rest my case.

https://musiclab.chromeexperiments.com

And a blog post on the idea:
Introducing Chrome Music Lab

The post Google are giving away experiments to teach music and code appeared first on cdm createdigitalmusic.

by Peter Kirn at March 09, 2016 04:05 PM

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] Linux VST/VSTi list updated

Greetings,

Just to note that I've updated the page at

http://linux-sound.org/linux-vst-plugins.html

to include some new items.

Please let me know of any needed corrections, deletions, or items I
should add to the list.

Best,

dp

_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-announce mailing list
Linux-audio-announce@lists.linuxaudio.org
http://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-announce

by woh.rr.com at March 09, 2016 01:19 PM

March 05, 2016

GStreamer News

Orc 0.4.25 bug-fix release

The GStreamer team announces another maintenance bug-fix release of liborc, the Optimized Inner Loop Runtime Compiler. Main changes since the previous release:

  • compiler: also prefer the backup function when no target, instead of trying to use emulation which is usually slower
  • executor: fix load of parameters smaller than 64 bits, fixing crashes on ldresnearb and friends in emulated code
  • Only check for Android's liblog on Android targets, so we don't accidentally pick up another liblog that may exist elsewhere
  • Make -Bsymbolic check in configure work with clang

Direct tarball download: orc-0.4.25.

March 05, 2016 12:30 AM

March 04, 2016

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] Skylark

Yoshimi 1.3.9, that is :)

This is another consolidation release (although there are a few new features).

With people, and some distros moving to GCC 6 we felt we should make sure we
are squeaky clean, as this is much more pedantic regarding code correctness.

Our new version has been extensively tested on GCC 4.9/5.3/6.0 both for
compilation and runtime performance. One of our users has also double checked
by compiling with Clang 3.5

More details in the README.txt file.

As usual, available from:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/yoshimi
and:
https://github.com/Yoshimi/yoshimi

--
Will J Godfrey
http://www.musically.me.uk
Say you have a poem and I have a tune.
Exchange them and we can both have a poem, a tune, and a song.
_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-announce mailing list
Linux-audio-announce@lists.linuxaudio.org
http://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-announce

by musically.me.uk at March 04, 2016 07:37 PM

March 02, 2016

rncbc.org

Vee One Suite 0.7.4 - The Ninth-bis beta release


Hello again,

The so called Vee One Suite aka. the gang of three of old-school software instruments, respectively synthv1, as a polyphonic subtractive synthesizer, samplv1, a polyphonic sampler synthesizer and drumkv1 as one drum-kit sampler, are released yet again in their ninth official beta second iteration (bis).

Still available in dual form:

  • a pure stand-alone JACK client with JACK-session, NSM (Non Session management) and both JACK MIDI and ALSA MIDI input support;
  • a LV2 instrument plug-in.

As simple as a change-log may go:

  • Fixed the DCF Formant filter voice initialization reset.
  • French translation updated (by Olivier Humbert, thanks).

The Vee One Suite are free, open-source Linux Audio software, distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL) version 2 or later.

And so they go again!

synthv1 - an old-school polyphonic synthesizer

synthv1 0.7.4 (ninth-bis official beta) is out!

synthv1 is an old-school all-digital 4-oscillator subtractive polyphonic synthesizer with stereo fx.

LV2 URI: http://synthv1.sourceforge.net/lv2

website:
http://synthv1.sourceforge.net

downloads:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/synthv1/files

git repos:
http://git.code.sf.net/p/synthv1/code
https://github.com/rncbc/synthv1

Flattr this

samplv1 - an old-school polyphonic sampler

samplv1 0.7.4 (ninth-bis official beta) is out!

samplv1 is an old-school polyphonic sampler synthesizer with stereo fx.

LV2 URI: http://samplv1.sourceforge.net/lv2

website:
http://samplv1.sourceforge.net

downloads:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/samplv1/files

git repos:
http://git.code.sf.net/p/samplv1/code
https://github.com/rncbc/samplv1

Flattr this

drumkv1 - an old-school drum-kit sampler

drumkv1 0.7.4 (ninth-bis official beta) is out!

drumkv1 is an old-school drum-kit sampler synthesizer with stereo fx.

LV2 URI: http://drumkv1.sourceforge.net/lv2

website:
http://drumkv1.sourceforge.net

downloads:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/drumkv1/files

git repos:
http://git.code.sf.net/p/drumkv1/code
https://github.com/rncbc/drumkv1

Flattr this

Enjoy && keep the fun ;)

by rncbc at March 02, 2016 07:00 PM

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] Vee One Suite 0.7.4 - The Ninth-bis beta release

Hello again,

The so called 'Vee One Suite' aka. 'the gang of three' old-school
software instruments, respectively synthv1 [1] as a polyphonic
subtractive synthesizer, samplv1 [2] a polyphonic sampler synthesizer
and drumkv1 [3] as one drum-kit sampler, are released yet again in their
ninth official beta second iteration (bis).

Still available in dual form:

- a pure stand-alone JACK [4] client with JACK-session, NSM [5] (Non
Session management) and both JACK MIDI and ALSA [6] MIDI input support;
- a LV2 [7] instrument plug-in.

As simple as a change-log may go:

- Fixed the DCF Formant filter voice initialization reset.
- French translation updated (by Olivier Humbert, thanks).

The Vee One Suite are free, open-source Linux Audio [9] software,
distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL) [8]
version 2 or later.

And here they are again!


**synthv1 - an old-school polyphonic synthesizer [1]**

synthv1 0.7.4 (ninth-bis official beta) is out!

synthv1 is an old-school all-digital 4-oscillator subtractive
polyphonic synthesizer with stereo fx.

LV2 URI: http://synthv1.sourceforge.net/lv2

website:
http://synthv1.sourceforge.net

downloads:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/synthv1/files

- source tarball:
http://download.sf.net/synthv1/synthv1-0.7.4.tar.gz

- source package:
http://download.sf.net/synthv1/synthv1-0.7.4-27.rncbc.suse.src.rpm

- binary packages (openSUSE Tumbleweed):
http://download.sf.net/synthv1/synthv1-0.7.4-27.rncbc.suse.i586.rpm
http://download.sf.net/synthv1/synthv1-0.7.4-27.rncbc.suse.x86_84.rpm

git repos:
http://git.code.sf.net/p/synthv1/code
https://github.com/rncbc/synthv1


**samplv1 - an old-school polyphonic sampler [2]**

samplv1 0.7.4 (ninth-bis official beta) is out!

samplv1 is an old-school polyphonic sampler synthesizer with stereo fx.

LV2 URI: http://samplv1.sourceforge.net/lv2

website:
http://samplv1.sourceforge.net

downloads:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/samplv1/files

- source tarball:
http://download.sf.net/samplv1/samplv1-0.7.4.tar.gz

- source package:
http://download.sf.net/samplv1/samplv1-0.7.4-27.rncbc.suse.src.rpm

- binary packages (openSUSE Tumbleweed):
http://download.sf.net/samplv1/samplv1-0.7.4-27.rncbc.suse.i586.rpm
http://download.sf.net/samplv1/samplv1-0.7.4-27.rncbc.suse.x86_84.rpm

git repos:
http://git.code.sf.net/p/samplv1/code
https://github.com/rncbc/samplv1


**drumkv1 - an old-school drum-kit sampler [3]**

drumkv1 0.7.4 (ninth-bis official beta) is out!

drumkv1 is an old-school drum-kit sampler synthesizer with stereo fx.

LV2 URI: http://drumkv1.sourceforge.net/lv2

website:
http://drumkv1.sourceforge.net

downloads:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/drumkv1/files

- source tarball:
http://download.sf.net/drumkv1/drumkv1-0.7.4.tar.gz

- source package:
http://download.sf.net/drumkv1/drumkv1-0.7.4-23.rncbc.suse.src.rpm

- binary packages (openSUSE Tumbleweed):
http://download.sf.net/drumkv1/drumkv1-0.7.4-23.rncbc.suse.i586.rpm
http://download.sf.net/drumkv1/drumkv1-0.7.4-23.rncbc.suse.x86_84.rpm

git repos:
http://git.code.sf.net/p/drumkv1/code
https://github.com/rncbc/drumkv1


References:

[1] synthv1 - an old-school polyphonic synthesizer
http://synthv1.sourceforge.net/

[2] samplv1 - an old-school polyphonic sampler
http://samplv1.sourceforge.net/

[3] drumkv1 - an old-school drum-kit sampler
http://drumkv1.sourceforge.net/

[4] JACK Audio Connection Kit
http://jackaudio.org/

[5] NSM, Non Session Management
http://non.tuxfamily.org/nsm/

[6] ALSA, Advanced Linux Sound Architecture
http://www.alsa-project.org/

[7] LV2, Audio Plugin Standard, the extensible successor of LADSPA
http://lv2plug.in/

[8] GNU General Public License
http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/gpl.html

[9] Linux Audio consortium of libre software for audio-related work
http://linuxaudio.org


See also:
http://www.rncbc.org/drupal/node/1012


Enjoy && keep the fun ;)
--
rncbc aka. Rui Nuno Capela
_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-announce mailing list
Linux-audio-announce@lists.linuxaudio.org
http://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-announce

by rncbc.org at March 02, 2016 06:47 PM

March 01, 2016

GStreamer News

GStreamer Core, Plugins, RTSP Server, Editing Services, Python, Validate, VAAPI 1.8.0 release candidate 1 (1.7.90)

The GStreamer team is pleased to announce the first release candidate of the stable 1.8 release series. The 1.8 release series is adding new features on top of the 1.0, 1.2, 1.4 and 1.6 series and is part of the API and ABI-stable 1.x release series of the GStreamer multimedia framework.

Binaries for Android, iOS, Mac OS X and Windows will be provided separately during the stable 1.8 release series.

Check out the release notes for GStreamer core, gst-plugins-base, gst-plugins-good, gst-plugins-ugly, gst-plugins-bad, gst-libav, gst-rtsp-server, gst-python, gst-editing-services, gst-validate, or gstreamer-vaapi, or download tarballs for gstreamer, gst-plugins-base, gst-plugins-good, gst-plugins-ugly, gst-plugins-bad, gst-libav, gst-rtsp-server, gst-python, gst-editing-services, gst-validate, or gstreamer-vaapi.

March 01, 2016 06:00 PM

February 29, 2016

OSM podcast

Audio, Linux and the combination

MOD DUO has arrived !

Hi all !

I know that it has been a loooong time since i posted anything but i do have a life you know ;-)

Anyway, i just wanted to share that my MOD DUO arrived and my son an I made a little MOD DUO unboxing video about it !



Great device, really nice build and so far the interface just blew me away !
I plan on doing some more vids on the MOD, but no promises !

Enjoy !


by noreply@blogger.com (Thijs Van Severen) at February 29, 2016 08:23 AM

Linux Audio Users & Musicians Video Blog

No Sister – Yassin Philip

New Track and video by Philip Yassin – Pop Tech

Video made with Blender VSE, Audio produced with Ubuntu, Qtractor, Calf Plugins and JAMin for mastering.



by DJ Kotau at February 29, 2016 08:21 AM

February 24, 2016

OpenAV

FLOSS Weekly : Stream Available

FLOSS Weekly : Stream Available

The image says it all – the FLOSS weekly interview is available – check it out to hear the latest about OpenAV, MOD Devices if you missed the live-stream! Thanks to Randal and Guillermo, and all the crew at FLOSS Weekly podcast. Professional gentlemen, a pleasure to have been on the show. Thanks! Read more →

by harry at February 24, 2016 09:47 PM

February 22, 2016

ardour

Nightly/Development News: "tabbed' has landed

If you use the nightly builds at http://nightly.ardour.org/ or if you build your own version of Ardour from git (for yourself or others), please be aware that at about 20:30 GMT, the master branch was merged with the "tabbed" branch and thus the resulting builds will be substantively different from any older versions.

The "tabbed" branch features two important changes from previous versions of Ardour. First and foremost, both the editor and mixer windows (along with the preferences window) are by default displayed as tabs in a single window. The tabs can be torn off to create detached versions, and the program will remember this state. Secondly, the entire mechanism for keyboard shortcuts has been completely redesigned to allow us to break away more easily from the constraints that GTK+ (our GUI toolkit) was imposing on us.

The "tabbed" branch was under development for months, and has received some testing by a handful of kind and brave users. We nevertheless expect some breakage to emerge as more people start trying it out.

If you use nightly builds or build Ardour yourself from git, please take a moment to consider the implications of your next "update". That said, please test it out and let us know what you think. There are lots of details left to be worked on before we consider this ready for release, and it will be a better release the more feedback we get.

read more

by paul at February 22, 2016 08:43 PM