planet.linuxaudio.org

January 21, 2019

Linux – CDM Create Digital Music

Bitwig Studio is about to deliver on a fully modular core in a DAW

Bitwig Studio may have started in the shadow of Ableton, but one of its initial promises was building a DAW that was modular from the ground up. Bitwig Studio 3 is poised to finally deliver on that promise, with “The Grid.”

Having a truly modular system inside a DAW offers some tantalizing possibilities. It means, in theory at least, you can construct whatever you want from basic building blocks. And in the very opposite of today’s age of presets, that could make your music tool feel more your own.

Oh yeah, and if there is such an engine inside your DAW, you can also count on other people building a bunch of stuff you can reuse.

Why modulaity? It doesn’t have to just be about tinkering (though that can be fun for a lot of people).

A modular setup is the very opposite of a preset mentality for music production. Experienced users of these environments (software especially, since it’s open-ended) do often find that patching exactly what they need can be more creative and inspirational. It can even save time versus the effort spent trying to whittle away at a big, monolithic tool just go get to the bit you actually want. But the traditional environments for modular development are fairly unfriendly to new users – that’s why very often people’s first encounters with Max/MSP, SuperCollider, Pd, Reaktor, and the like is in a college course. (And not everyone has access to those.) Here, you get a toolset that could prove more manageable. And then once you have a patch you like, you can still interconnect premade devices – and you can work with clips and linear arrangement to actually finish songs. With the other tools, that often means coding out the structure of your song or trying to link up to a different piece of software.

We’ve seen other DAWs go modular in different ways. There’s Apple Logic’s now mostly rarely-used Environment. There’s Reason with its rich, patchable rack and devices. There’s Sensomusic Usine, which is a fully modular DAW / audio environment, and DMX lighting and video tool – perhaps the most modular of these (even relative to Bitwig Studio and The Grid). And of course there’s Ableton Live with Max for Live, though that’s really a different animal – it’s a full patching development environment that runs inside Live via a runtime, and API and interface hooks that allow you to access its devices. The upside: Max for Live can do just about everything. The downside: it’s mostly foreign to Ableton Live (as it’s a different piece of software with its own history), and it could be too deep for someone just wanting to build an effect or instrument.

So, enter The Grid. This is really the first time a relatively conventional DAW has gotten its own, native modular environment that can build instruments and effects. And it looks like it could be accomplished in a way that feels comfortable to existing users. You get a toolset for patching your own stuff inside the DAW, and you can even mix and match signal to outboard hardware modular if that’s your thing.

And it really focuses on sound applications, too, with three devices. One is dedicated to monophonic synths, one to polyphonic synths, and one to effects.

From there, you get a fully modular setup with a modern-looking UI and 120+ modules to choose from.

They’ve done a whole lot to ease the learning curve normally associated with these environments – smoothing out some of the wrinkles that usually baffle beginners:

You can patch anything to anything, in to out. All signals are interchangeable – connect any out to any in. Most other software environments don’t work that way, which can mean a steeper learning curve. (We’ll have to see how this works in practice inside The Grid).

Any in can go to any out – reducing some of the complexity of other patching environments (software and hardware alike).

Everything’s stereo. Here’s another way of reducing complexity. Normally, you have to duplicate signals to get stereo, which can be confusing for beginners. Here, every audio cable and every control cable routes stereo.

Everything’s also in living stereo, reducing cable count and cognitive effort.

There are default patchings. Funny enough, this idea has actually been seen on hardware – there are default routings so modules automatically wire themselves if you want, via what Bitwig calls “pre-cords.” That means if you’re new to the environment, you can always plug stuff in.

They’ve also promised to make phase easier to understand, which should open up creative use of time and modulation to those who may have been intimidated by these concepts before.

“Pre-cords” mean you can easily add default patchings to get stuff working straight away.

What fun is a modular tool if you can’t explore phase? Bitwig say they’ve made this concept more accessible to modulation and easier to learn.

There’s also a big advantage to this being native to the environment – again, something you could only really say about Sensomusic Usine before now (at least as far as things that could double as DAWs).

This unlocks:

  • Nesting and layering devices alongside other Bitwig devices
  • Full support from the Open Controller API. (Wow, this is a pain the moment you put something like Reaktor into another host, too.)
  • Route modulation out of your stuff from The Grid into other Bitwig devices.
  • Complete hardware modular integration – yeah, you can mix your software with hardware as if they’re one environment. Bitwig says they’ve included “dedicated grid modules for sending any control, trigger, or pitch signal as CV Out and receiving any CV In.”

I’ve been waiting for this basically since the beginning. This is an unprecedented level of integration, where every device you see in Bitwig Studio is already based on this modular environment. Bitwig had even touted that early on, but I think they were far overzealous with letting people know about their plans. It unsurprisingly took a while to make that interface user friendly, which is why it’ll be a pleasure to try this now and see how they’ve done. But Bitwig tells us this is in fact the same engine – and that the interface “melds our twin focus on modularity and swift workflows.”

There’s also a significant dedication to signal fidelity. There’s 4X oversampling throughout. That should generally sound better, but it also has implications for control and modularity. And it’ll make modulation more powerful in synthesis, Bitwig tells CDM:

With phase, sync, and pitch inputs on most every oscillator, there are many opportunities here for complex setups. Providing this additional bandwidth keeps most any patch or experiment from audible aliasing. As an open system, this type of optimization works for the most cases without overtaxing processors.

It’s stereo only, which puts it behind some of the multichannel capabilities of Reaktor, Max, SuperCollider, and others – Max/MSP especially given its recent developments. But that could see some growth in a later release, Bitwig hints. For now, I think stereo will keep us plenty busy.

They’ve also been busy optimizing, Bitwig tells us:

This is something we worked a lot on in early development, particularly optimizing performance on the oversampled, stereo paths to align with the vector units of desktop processors. In addition, the modules are compiled at runtime for the best performance on the particular CPU in use.

That’s a big deal. I’m also excited about using this on Linux – where, by the way, you can really easily use JACK to integrate other environments like SuperCollider or live coding tools.

If you’re at NAMM, Bitwig will show The Grid as part of Bitwig Studio 3. They have a release coming in the second quarter, but we’ll sit down with them here in Berlin for a detailed closer look (minus NAMM noise in the background or jetlag)!

Oh yeah, and if you’ve got the Upgrade Plan, it’s free.

This is really about making a fully modular DAW – as opposed to the fixed multitrack tape/mixer models of the past. Bitwig have even written up an article about how they see modularity and how it’s evolved over various release versions:

BEHIND THE SCENES: MODULARITY IN BITWIG STUDIO

More on Bitwig Studio 3:

https://www.bitwig.com/en/19/bitwig-studio-3

Obligatory:

Oh yeah, also Tron: Legacy seems like a better movie with French subtitles…

That last line fits: “And the world was more beautiful than I ever dreamed – and also more dangerous … hop in bed now, come on.”

Yeah, personal life / sleep … in trouble.

The post Bitwig Studio is about to deliver on a fully modular core in a DAW appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

by Peter Kirn at January 21, 2019 04:21 PM

January 19, 2019

digital audio hacks – Hackaday

Somewhere Down in Africa Toto is Playing on Loop

Amidst the vast expanse of sand dunes in the Namib desert, there now exists a sound installation dedicated to pouring out the 1982 soft rock classic “Africa” by Toto. Six speakers connected to an MP3 player all powered by a few solar powered USB battery packs, and it is literally located somewhere down in Africa (see lyrics). The whole project, known as TOTO FOREVER, was the creation of film director [Max Siedentopf] who himself grew up in Namibia.

“I set up a sound installation which pays tribute to probably the most popular song of the last four decades…and the installation runs on solar batteries to keep Toto going for all eternity.”

Max Siedentopf, Creator of TOTO FOREVER

[Siedentopf] certainly chose a song that resonates with people on a number of levels. Toto’s “Africa” was one of the most streamed songs on YouTube in 2017 with over 369 million plays. The song continues to reach a new generation of fans as it has also been the subject of a number of internet memes. Though those local to the sound installation have had some less than positive things to say. [Siedentopf] told BBC, “Some [Namibians] say it’s probably the worst sound installation ever. I think that’s a great compliment.”

The idea of the installation “lasting for all eternity” will certainly be difficult to achieve since the components most certainly lack any serious IP rating. The audio player itself appears to be a RHDTShop mp3 player that according to its Amazon listing page, has three to four hours of battery life per charge. Considering the size of those solar cells the whole thing will probably be dead in a week or two (it is in a desert after all), but no one can deny the statement TOTO FOREVER makes. Below is some footage of the art piece in action taken by the artist himself.

via BBC

by Drew Littrell at January 19, 2019 09:00 PM

January 15, 2019

KXStudio News

Carla 2.0 RC3 is here!

Hello everyone, happy new year!
This is a quick fix for the Carla Plugin Host (soon-to-be) stable series.
Only very small fixes here, and a change on how specific plugins load.
This release starts a "release early, release often" attitude, that hopefully I can maintain from now on.

Changelog

  • Fix bridge-lv2-x11 crash when manually started from CLI
  • LV2: Don't prefer plugin bridges for certain hardcoded plugins (Calf, ir.lv2 and v1 series)
  • VST: Do not call plugin effEditIdle on update display opcode, fixing crashes for a few plugins

Previously a few plugins were hardcoded to run as plugin bridges, as they were deemed unsafe because of how they use their plugin UIs (instance-access).
Carla automatically started these plugins as bridges, as to not crash the main process when Gtk and Qt gets in the way.
Plugin state in bridges have a few issues (as plugin bridges are experimental right now), which I was hoping to fix before the final 2.0 is here.
But that will not happen it seems (not an easy fix), so now these plugins will run normally as all others do, in the same process.
This means the following possible breaking changes:

  • If v1 plugin series are compiled with a Qt version different than the one Carla is using, expect a crash on load or soon afterwards
  • Calf plugin UIs will be missing their graphs by default, unless you disable running plugin UIs in bridge mode in Carla settings

This is not an issue for other plugin UIs that use Qt or Gtk, as they do not use LV2 instance-access.
Carla runs Gtk and Qt LV2 UIs in a separate process, but because these UIs require direct access to the plugin instance, they cannot be bridged.

Downloads

To download Carla binaries or source code, jump on over to the KXStudio downloads section.
If you're using the KXStudio repositories, you can simply install "carla-git" (plus "carla-lv2" and "carla-vst" if you're so inclined).
Bug reports and feature requests are welcome! Jump on over to the Carla's Github project page for those.

Future

A "2.0-final" milestone is on GitHub, which lists the remaining issues to be fixed before 2.0 is considered "final".
New features already made its way to Carla, but sit on the develop branch.
When the "final" version is released, expect a 2.1-beta to come shortly afterwards.

by falkTX at January 15, 2019 05:41 PM

JackAss v1.1 release

This is a tiny bugfix for JackAss, a VST plugin that provides JACK-MIDI support for VST hosts.

The only change is that Wine 64bit builds work now, so you can finally load it inside 64bit Windows applications running on GNU/Linux via Wine.
Tested to work with FL Studio 20.

You can find JackAss source code and bug tracker in Github, at https://github.com/falkTX/JackAss/.

by falkTX at January 15, 2019 05:40 PM

January 13, 2019

blog4

codepage livecoding concert Madrid 17. January

We are at the ICLC International Conference On Livecoding 2019 in Madrid next week and perform a new piece surface tension II at NAVE DE TERNERAS 17. January with our project codepage, using the livecoding system Tidal Cycles to process our field recordings from Iceland, Finland and Denmark.

by herrsteiner (noreply@blogger.com) at January 13, 2019 02:00 PM

January 12, 2019

blog4

January 10, 2019

Bug tracker updated

@paul wrote:

tracker.ardour.org has been upgraded from an ancient version of Mantis to the most current stable release. The website looks very different now, but all existing bug reports and user accounts are still there. We hope to find some way to limit the bug-report spam that has recently turned into a small but annoying time waster, and ultimately to enable single-sign on with the rest of ardour.org.

Posts: 4

Participants: 4

Read full topic

by @paul Paul Davis at January 10, 2019 06:13 PM

January 08, 2019

rncbc.org

QmidiCtl 0.5.3 - An Early Winter'19 Release


Happy New Year!

QmidiCtl 0.5.3 (early winter'19) is out!

QmidiCtl is a MIDI remote controller application that sends MIDI data over the network, using UDP/IP multicast. Inspired by multimidicast (http://llg.cubic.org/tools) and designed to be compatible with ipMIDI for Windows (http://nerds.de). QmidiCtl was long ago designed for the Maemo enabled handheld devices, namely the late Nokia N900 and promoted to the Maemo Package repositories. Nevertheless, QmidiCtl may still be found effective as a regular desktop application and recently as an Android application as well.

See also: QmidiNet - A MIDI network gateway via UDP/IP multicast.

Website:
http://qmidictl.sourceforge.net
https://qmidictl.sourceforge.io
Project page:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/qmidictl
Downloads:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/qmidictl/files

Git repos:

http://git.code.sf.net/p/qmidictl/code
https://github.com/rncbc/qmidictl.git
https://gitlab.com/rncbc/qmidictl.git
https://bitbucket.com/rncbc/qmidictl.git

Change-log (since An(other) Early Summer'18 release):

  • Added proper display names to Command and Control Type entry fields on Configure dialog (ie. MIDI controller assignments dialog).
  • Old deprecated Qt4 build support is no more.
  • AppData/AppStream metadata is now settled under an all permissive license (FSFAP); also updated to be the most compliant with latest freedesktop.org specification and recommendation.

License:

QmidiCtl is free, open-source Linux Audio software, distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL) version 2 or later.

 

Enjoy && have fun.

Donate to rncbc.org

by rncbc at January 08, 2019 07:00 PM

January 07, 2019

linux-audio « WordPress.com Tag Feed

Video: Aircraft battle Rosedale blaze from sky at night

The fire at Rosedale, which has burned more than 11,500ha across an 85km perimeter, started at an is

January 07, 2019 02:10 AM

December 29, 2018

digital audio hacks – Hackaday

Freeforming the Atari Punk Console

This stunning piece of art is [Emily Velasco’s] take on the Atari Punk Console. It’s a freeform circuit that synthesizes sound using 555 timers. The circuit has been around for a long time, but her fabrication is completely new and simply incredible!

This isn’t [Emily’s] first rodeo. She previously built the mini CRT sculpture project seen to the left in the image above. Its centerpiece is a tiny CRT from an old video camera viewfinder, and it is fairly common for the driver circuit to understand composite video. And unlike CRTs, small video cameras with composite video output are easily available today for not much money. Together they bring a piece of 1980s-era video equipment into the modern selfie age. The cubic frame holding everything together is also the ground plane, but its main purpose is to give us an unimpeded view. We can admire the detail on this CRT and its accompanying circuitry representing 1982 state of the art in miniaturized consumer electronics. (And yes, high voltage components are safely insulated. Just don’t poke your finger under anything.)

With the experience gained from building that electrically simple brass frame, [Emily] then stepped up the difficulty for her follow-up project. It started with a sound synthesizer circuit built around a pair of 555 timers, popularized in the 1980s and nicknamed the Atari Punk Console. Since APC is a popular circuit found in several other Hackaday-featured projects, [Emily] decided she needed to add something else to stand out. Thus in addition to building her circuit in three-dimensional brass, two photocells were incorporated to give it rudimentary vision into its environment. Stimulus for this now light-sensitive APC were provided in the form of a RGB LED. One with a self-contained circuit to cycle through various colors and blinking patterns.

These two projects neatly bookend the range of roles brass rods can take in your own creations. From a simple frame that stays out of the way to being the central nervous system. While our Circuit Sculpture Contest judges may put emphasis the latter, both are equally valid ways to present something that is aesthetic in addition to being functional. Brass, copper, and wood are a refreshing change of pace from our standard materials of 3D-printed plastic and FR4 PCB. Go forth and explore what you can do!

 

by Roger Cheng at December 29, 2018 12:01 PM

December 23, 2018

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

Libre Music Production is taking a break

As the LMP crew right now only consists of one person (me) and we haven't published any new content for a year, I have decided to let LMP take a break.

This break might be forever. I will keep the content through 2019, at least.

If anyone would like to take over the site, please contact me: staffan.melin@oscillator.se.

Thank you for visiting LMP!

by admin at December 23, 2018 11:17 PM

December 20, 2018

drobilla.net - LAD

Suil 0.10.2

suil 0.10.2 has been released. Suil is a library for loading and wrapping LV2 plugin UIs. For more information, see http://drobilla.net/software/suil.

Changes:

  • Add support for Cocoa in Qt5
  • Fix resizing and add idle and update rate support for Qt5 in Gtk2
  • Fix various issues with Qt5 in Gtk2

by drobilla at December 20, 2018 05:22 PM

Linux – CDM Create Digital Music

Build your own scratch DJ controller

If DJing originated in the creative miuse and appropriation of hardware, perhaps the next wave will come from DIYers inventing new approaches. No need to wait, anyway – you can try building this scratch controller yourself.

DJWORX has done some great ongoing coverage of Andy Tait aka Rasteri. You can read a complete overview of Andy’s SC1000, a Raspberry Pi-based project with metal touch platter:

Step aside portablism — the tiny SC1000 is here

In turn, there’s also that project’s cousin, the 7″ Portable Scratcher aka 7PS.

If you’re wondering what portablism is, that’s DJs carrying portable record players around. But maybe more to the point, if you can invent new gear that fits in a DJ booth, you can experiment with DJing in new ways. (Think how much current technique is really circumscribed by the feature set of CDJs, turntables, and fairly identical DJ software.)

Or to look at it another way, you can really treat the DJ device as a musical instrument – one you can still carry around easily.

The SC1000 in Rasteri’s capable hands is exciting just to behold:

Everything you need to build this yourself – or to discover the basis for other ideas – is up on GitHub:

https://github.com/rasteri/SC1000/

This is not a beginner project. But it’s not overwhelmingly complicated, either. Basically…

Ingredients:
Custom PCB
System-on-module (the brains of the operation)
SD card
Enclosure
Jog wheel with metal capacitive touch surface and magnet
Mini fader

Free software powers the actual DJing. (It’s based on xwax, open source Linux digital vinyl emulation, which we’ve seen as the basis of other DIY projects.)

Process:

You need to assemble the main PCB – there’s your soldering iron action.

And you’ll flash the firmware (which requires a PIC programmer), plus transfer the OS to SD card.

Assembly of the jog wheel and enclosure requires a little drilling and gluing

Other than that it’s a matter of testing and connection.

Build tutorial:

Full open source under a GPLv2 license. (Andy sort of left out the hardware license – this really sort of illustrates that GNU need a license that blankets both hardware and software, though that’s complex legally. There’s no copyright information on the hardware; to be fully open it needs something like a Creative Commons license on those elements of the designs. But that’s not a big deal.)

It looks really fantastic. I definitely want to try building one of these in Berlin – will team up and let you know how it goes.

This clearly isn’t for everyone. But the reason I mention going to custom hardware is, this means both that you can adapt your own technique to a particular instrument and you can modify the way the digital DJ tool responds if you so choose. It may take some time before we see that bear fruit, but it definitely holds some potential.

Via:
Rasteri’s SC1000 scratch controller — build your own today [thanks to Mark Settle over at DJWORX!]

Project page:
https://github.com/rasteri/SC1000/

Thanks, Dubby Labby!

The post Build your own scratch DJ controller appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

by Peter Kirn at December 20, 2018 05:13 PM

December 12, 2018

rncbc.org

Vee One Suite 0.9.4 - A Late Autumn'18 Release


Greetings!

The Vee One Suite of so called old-school software instruments, synthv1, as a polyphonic subtractive synthesizer, samplv1, a polyphonic sampler synthesizer, drumkv1 as yet another drum-kit sampler and padthv1 as a polyphonic additive synthesizer, are being released for the late in Autumn'18.

All still available in dual format:

  • a pure stand-alone JACK client with JACK-session, NSM (Non Session management) and both JACK MIDI and ALSA MIDI input support;
  • a LV2 instrument plug-in.

The changes for this special season are the following:

  • Make sure all LV2 state sample file references are resolved to their original and canonical file-paths (not symlinks). (applies to samplv1 and drumkv1 only)
  • Fixed a severe bug on saving the LV2 plug-in state: the sample file reference was being saved with the wrong name identifier and thus gone missing on every session or state reload thereafter.(applies to samplv1 only).
  • Sample waveform drawing is a bit more keen to precision.
  • Old deprecated Qt4 build support is no more.
  • Normalized wavetable oscillator phasors.
  • Added missing include <unistd.h> to shut up some stricter compilers from build failures.

The Vee One Suite are free, open-source Linux Audio software, distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL) version 2 or later.

And here they go again!

 

synthv1 - an old-school polyphonic synthesizer

synthv1 0.9.4 (late-autumn'18) released!

synthv1 is an old-school all-digital 4-oscillator subtractive polyphonic synthesizer with stereo fx.

LV2 URI: http://synthv1.sourceforge.net/lv2

website:
http://synthv1.sourceforge.net
https://synthv1.sourceforge.io

downloads:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/synthv1/files

git repos:
http://git.code.sf.net/p/synthv1/code
https://github.com/rncbc/synthv1.git
https://gitlab.com/rncbc/synthv1.git
https://bitbucket.org/rncbc/synthv1.git

 

samplv1 - an old-school polyphonic sampler

samplv1 0.9.4 (late-autumn'18) released!

samplv1 is an old-school polyphonic sampler synthesizer with stereo fx.

LV2 URI: http://samplv1.sourceforge.net/lv2

website:
http://samplv1.sourceforge.net
https://samplv1.sourceforge.io

downloads:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/samplv1/files

git repos:
http://git.code.sf.net/p/samplv1/code
https://github.com/rncbc/samplv1.git
https://gitlab.com/rncbc/samplv1.git
https://bitbucket.org/rncbc/samplv1.git

 

drumkv1 - an old-school drum-kit sampler

drumkv1 0.9.4 (late-autumn'18) released!

drumkv1 is an old-school drum-kit sampler synthesizer with stereo fx.

LV2 URI: http://drumkv1.sourceforge.net/lv2

website:
http://drumkv1.sourceforge.net
https://drumkv1.sourceforge.io

downloads:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/drumkv1/files

git repos:
http://git.code.sf.net/p/drumkv1/code
https://github.com/rncbc/drumkv1.git
https://gitlab.com/rncbc/drumkv1.git
https://bitbucket.org/rncbc/drumkv1.git

 

padthv1 - an old-school polyphonic additive synthesizer

padthv1 0.9.4 (late-autumn'18) released!

padthv1 is an old-school polyphonic additive synthesizer with stereo fx

padthv1 is based on the PADsynth algorithm by Paul Nasca, as a special variant of additive synthesis.

LV2 URI: http://padthv1.sourceforge.net/lv2

website:
http://padthv1.sourceforge.net
https://padthv1.sourceforge.io

downloads:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/padthv1/files

git repos:
http://git.code.sf.net/p/padthv1/code
https://github.com/rncbc/padthv1.git
https://gitlab.com/rncbc/padthv1.git
https://bitbucket.org/rncbc/padthv1.git

 

Donate to rncbc.org

Enjoy && As always please, have lots of fun.

by rncbc at December 12, 2018 07:00 PM

October 18, 2018

News – Ubuntu Studio

Ubuntu Studio 18.10 Released

The Ubuntu Studio team is pleased to announce the release of Ubuntu Studio 18.10 “Cosmic Cuttlefish”. As a regular release, this version of Ubuntu Studio will be supported for 9 months. Since it’s just out, you may experience some issues, so you might want to wait a bit before upgrading. Please see the release notes […]

by eeickmeyer at October 18, 2018 05:45 PM

October 09, 2018

GStreamer News

GStreamer Conference 2018: Talks Abstracts and Speakers Biographies now available

The GStreamer Conference team is pleased to announce that talk abstracts and speaker biographies are now available for this year's lineup of talks and speakers, covering again an exciting range of topics!

The GStreamer Conference 2018 will take place on 25-26 October 2018 in Edinburgh (Scotland) just after the Embedded Linux Conference Europe (ELCE).

Details about the conference and how to register can be found on the conference website.

This year's topics and speakers:

Lightning Talks:

  • gst-mfx, gst-msdk and the Intel Media SDK: an update (provisional title)
    Haihao Xiang, Intel
  • Improved flexibility and stability in GStreamer V4L2 support
    Nicolas Dufresne, Collabora
  • GstQTOverlay
    Carlos Aguero, RidgeRun
  • Documenting GStreamer
    Mathieu Duponchelle, Centricular
  • GstCUDA
    Jose Jimenez-Chavarria, RidgeRun
  • GstWebRTCBin in the real world
    Mathieu Duponchelle, Centricular
  • Servo and GStreamer
    Víctor Jáquez, Igalia
  • Interoperability between GStreamer and DirectShow
    Stéphane Cerveau, Fluendo
  • Interoperability between GStreamer and FFMPEG
    Marek Olejnik, Fluendo
  • Encrypted Media Extensions with GStreamer in WebKit
    Xabier Rodríguez Calvar, Igalia
  • DataChannels in GstWebRTC
    Matthew Waters, Centricular
  • Me TV – a journey from C and Xine to Rust and GStreamer, via D
    Russel Winder
  • GStreamer pipeline on webOS OSE
    Jimmy Ohn (온용진), LG Electronics
  • ...and many more
  • ...
  • Submit your lightning talk now!

Many thanks to our sponsors, Collabora, Pexip, Igalia, Fluendo, Facebook, Centricular and Zeiss, without whom the conference would not be possible in this form. And to Ubicast who will be recording the talks again.

Considering becoming a sponsor? Please check out our sponsor brief.

We hope to see you all in Edinburgh in October! Don't forget to register!

October 09, 2018 01:30 PM

October 02, 2018

GStreamer News

GStreamer 1.14.4 stable bug fix release

The GStreamer team is pleased to announce another bug fix release in the stable 1.14 release series of your favourite cross-platform multimedia framework!

This release only contains bugfixes and it should be safe to update from 1.14.x.

See /releases/1.14/ for the details.

Binaries for Android, iOS, Mac OS X and Windows will be available shortly.

Download tarballs directly here: gstreamer, gst-plugins-base, gst-plugins-good, gst-plugins-ugly, gst-plugins-bad, gst-libav, gst-rtsp-server, gst-python, gst-editing-services, gst-validate, gstreamer-sharp, gstreamer-vaapi, or gst-omx.

October 02, 2018 11:30 PM

October 01, 2018

Ardour Web Forum Migration

@x42 wrote:

12 years ago the Ardour Forum was launched and there have been little to none infrastructure updates since.
12 years of Ardour online community.
12 years of web-evolution!

Brace yourself, because we have opted to perform a long overdue modernization and migrate the forum to discourse.org!

The most significant changes compared the previous forum are: support for dynamic notifications, a flat front-page with context and the page-less layout. Just keep scrolling down.

That barely scratches the surface though. There is plenty to discover and we hope you’ll feel right at home here with us!

However, we will leave you with some nostalgia from time to time:

  • User-accounts remain at https://community.ardour.org. This includes
    • Sign-on and password management
    • Download purchases, donation and subscriptions

All forum posts and comments have been migrated. You can even find the very first post of the then “The New Ardour Website” from early 2006 here :slight_smile:

There are certainly some loose-ends to be tied up to complete the migration. If you find some dangling links, or please don’t hesitate to let us know in the comments. You’re also more than welcome to leave feedback about this site, its organization and how we could improve it in the Feedback Section.

Let the discourse begin!

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by @x42 Robin Gareus at October 01, 2018 02:16 PM

September 28, 2018

News – Ubuntu Studio

Ubuntu Studio 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) Beta released

The Ubuntu Studio team is pleased to announce the final beta release of Ubuntu Studio 18.10 Cosmic Cuttlefish. While this beta is reasonably free of any showstopper CD build or installer bugs, you may find some bugs within. This image is, however, reasonably representative of what you will find when Ubuntu Studio 18.10 is released […]

by eeickmeyer at September 28, 2018 05:09 AM

August 30, 2018

Audio – Stefan Westerfeld's blog

SpectMorph 0.4.1 released

A new version of SpectMorph, my audio morphing software, is now available on www.spectmorph.org. Besides Linux and Windows, it now also runs on  macOS (>= 10.9).

In order to simplify the installation under Linux, the required instrument data for SpectMorph no longer needs to be downloaded seperately. Instead, the source tarball and Ubuntu packages include the instrument data (the other platforms already do this by default, too).

We added recordings of Claudia – a female opera singer – as new instrument (“Claudia Ah”, “Claudia Oh”, “Claudia Ih”). A few improvements to the instrument building tools were made along the way. To get good results from Claudia’s recordings, we had to add an algorithm that systematically reduces vibrato automatically.

As always, a few minor problems were fixed, for instance the VST plugin automation now works properly with Cubase. A detailed list of changes is available here.

The video for my presentation at Linux Audio Conf 2018 about how SpectMorph implements morphing is now available.

Finally, a new piece of music created by Sven and me with SpectMorph has been completed: Clicking.

by stw at August 30, 2018 12:55 PM