planet.linuxaudio.org

October 31, 2014

The Penguin Producer | The Penguin Producer

Breaking Silence

Yes, it’s been silent.  No, I have not gone away. For those who have been wondering, I was laid off last year, and took advantage of the situation to go back to school.  As of right now, I am studying telecommunications, which include audio and video production, and minoring in …

by Lampros Liontos at October 31, 2014 02:13 AM

October 30, 2014

linux.autostatic.com » linux.autostatic.com

LAC2014: submission accepted!

My submission for the Linux Sound Night at LAC2014 with The Infinite Repeat has been accepted. The Call for Papers page mentions the term "danceable" so I'm going to focus on that. Making danceable music is quite a challenge for me but it should definitely be doable to produce a solid set, especially now that I'm the proud owner of a Korg Volca Keys. I'm definitely going to integrate it in my current setup as the Volca reacts great on MIDI sent from my workstation. It has some fat sounds that just scream dance floor.


Korga Volca Keys

I'm really looking forward to this year's LAC. It seems falkTX and avlinux are going too, it'd be great to meet these guys in real life!

by Jeremy at October 30, 2014 07:19 PM

October 29, 2014

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

Creating Modular Synths using Ingen and ams-lv2

Ingen is a modular synth that runs under JACK. It uses LADSPA and LV2 plugins for its processing. It can be used to create modular synths by using synth plugin modules.
 

by Conor at October 29, 2014 10:12 AM

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] Rivendell v2.10.0

From: Frederick Gleason <fredg@...>
Subject: [LAA] Rivendell v2.10.0
Date: Oct 29, 8:49 am 2014

On behalf of the entire Rivendell development team, I'm pleased to announce the availability of Rivendell v2.10.0. Rivendell is a full-featured radio automation system targeted for use in professional broadcast environments. It is available under the GNU General Public License.

>From the NEWS file:
*** snip snip ***hanges:
Updated Translation. A new French translation has applied, courtesy
of the good folks at Tryphon [http://www.tryphon.eu/].

Log Tools Enhancements. Added various UI enhancements in RDLogManager
and RDLogEdit.

GPIO Logging. Added an event viewer in RDGpiMon to allow GPIO events
to be logged and viewed.

Music Scheduler Enhancements. Added the ability to utilize a second
Scheduler Code in music events in RDLogManager.

Report Generation Enhancements. Added the ability to specify a
post-export script when generating reports (analogous to pre-import
scripts for log imports).

RDImport Enhancements. Added -set-marker-start-*=',
'--set-marker-end-*=', '--set-marker-fadeup*=' '--set-marker-fadedown*=',
'--set-string-*=' and '--set-datetimes' options for rdimport(1).

Various other bug fixes. See the ChangeLog for details.

Database Update:
This version of Rivendell uses database schema version 242, and will
automatically upgrade any earlier versions. To see the current schema
version prior to upgrade, see RDAdmin->SystemInfo.

As always, be sure to run RDAdmin immediately after upgrading to allow
any necessary changes to the database schema to be applied*** snip snip ***

Further information, screenshots and download links are available at:

http://www.rivendellaudio.org/

Cheers!


|----------------------------------------------------------------------|
| Frederick F. Gleason, Jr. | Chief Developer |
| | Paravel Systems |
|----------------------------------------------------------------------|
| Focus on the dream, not the competition. |
| -- Nemesis Racing Team motto |
|----------------------------------------------------------------------|

_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-announce mailing list
Linux-audio-announce@lists.linuxaudio.org
http://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-announce

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October 29, 2014 09:01 AM

October 28, 2014

PipeManMusic

Spoons! A Love Affair with Wood.

I've loved wood since I was a child. I got my first pocket knife when I was 7 and for the following years I spent a lot of time carving wood. There is a zen in it for me. It's an interesting combination of the freedom of thought and intense focus that draws me in. I love the smell of wood, I love the texture of wood, I love the feel of wood in my hands.

Spoon at the
end of the class
Since I was very young I've loved watching "The Woodright's Shop" with Roy Underhill on PBS. It's the longest running PBS show and is all about traditional woodworking, the kind of thing that is 100% devoid of electrically powered tools. There is a romanticism in traditional woodworking. You can see in the traditional tools the evolution of man's relationship with it's environment. The burst of activity in the Industrial Revolution changed the landscape of our relationship with the forests. In many ways we turned our back on them. We tore forests down to make room for other enterprises and insulated ourselves from that connection with our ecosystem even further.

Finished Spoon
 from the class
Like many things in life, the struggle of a young family and developing a paying career led me to put aside my love affair with wood and focus on keeping a roof over my head and food on my table. Now, however, good fortune has allowed me to dip my toe back into the waters.

My Second Spoon
There is a very talented woodworker and teacher who has been featured on a number of episodes of the "The Woodright's Shop" named Peter Follansbee who did an episode on traditional Swedish spoon carving and I was very intrigued by them. I started following Mr. Follansbee's blog and keeping an eye on his spoon work. It seemed a cheap and easy way to get back into woodworking without too much expense. I didn't take the plunge till I saw a meetup posted on the Greater Denver Urban Homesteaders page about a spoon carving class taught by Drover through the Sarquit Outdoor Living School. The class was fun and gave me the bug to give it a try. Drover was a great guy to learn from and very enthusiastic in his work. When I got home, I decided to order a hook knife for carving the bowl of the spoon and finished the knife. The bug for carving is strong for me so I ordered two more knives a short bladed and a long bladed strait knife. I also grabbed a cheap hatchet for doing rough out and splitting chores.

The Third Spoon
I needed wood for more spoons and when driving by a nearby location I saw what I though was an apple tree, saw a brush pile of wind fallen branches and hiked up with my middle daughter holding a hand saw to see if I could get some good carving wood. Turns out it was a pear tree and we had fun picking some fruit and collecting some branches.

The first spoon that came out of the wood ended up a little more utilitarian looking than I'd hoped but I really enjoyed how easy green pear is to work with. I timed my first 3 spoons to see how long it took to completer using an android app, like a true geek and found it takes around 4 hours to produce one.
Baby Spoon Traded
 for More Wood

My next spoon still didn't turn out to be what I wanted but it was better than the first. With this spoon I really started figuring out more of the techniques and rebuilding the muscle memory for carving. By the third spoon I'd gotten most of the technique down and was really starting to enjoy the art of it all.

The "Haul" and
 My Handsome Nephew
After finishing the third spoon I had a mishap with the hatchet splitting out the blank for the fourth and did some pretty decent damage to my left hand, in fact I couldn't close my thumb across my hand for almost 2 weeks afterwards. By this time I was pretty much out of wood to work with and needed to source some more. I put out a call on social media but didn't turn up anything. So a quick Google search turned up the nearest tree trimmer to my house and I sent as concise and polite an e-mail as I could. Sure enough a few days later I got a response saying he'd trade all the wood I could handle for a spoon for his soon to be born first granddaughter. I set to work with some of the last of the pear wood making my first baby spoon. After marking it out and showing it to my wife, the expert in all things baby, she suggested some changes to the size and shape of the bowl and I went ahead with carving it out. I think it turned out fantastic, in fact maybe the best thing I've ever carved. After a few phone converstions setting up a meet time we got together at a time I could bring my nephew along. He was a great help loading up all the wood and when we got it all back home we both worked on some spoons.

I'm having a great time carving and I think cute baby spoons might be my current muse for carving. I can't wait to crank out a few more to give to new or soon to be parents in my life.
My Latest Spoon

by Daniel Worth (noreply@blogger.com) at October 28, 2014 08:01 PM

Create Digital Music » open-source

Windows 93 OS in Your Browser Comes with LSDJ, Pd, Nanoloop Music Apps

win93

It’s a nostalgia trip. It’s a net art piece. It’s a parallel dimension.

It’s also working music apps running (sort of) in your browser. It feels a little bit like playing with an elaborate doll house where you can open the fridge and add tiny food and the oven pretends to work. But in case you haven’t already been infected with the quantum distraction power of the Windows 93 browser yet, it might interest you to know that there are music apps inside.

There’s Pd – kinda. (Double-click the icon and it spawns a non-editable patch running in your browser.)

There’s also LSDJ, the quintessential Game Boy tracker. And there’s Nanoloop, the classic, beautifully-minimal Game Boy music maker that later migrated to iOS and Android (though that takes out the fun of buying weird hardware from Japan to hack our Nintendo handhelds). Those both appear to be running in a Nintendo emulation layer in-browser.

Play that and a glitched-out Pokemon plus get and disinfect yourself from computer viruses before you watch an ASCII Star Wars.

It says something about the evolution of net art, here as it’s steeped in layers of history and nerd-hipster irony. (Can I re-launch my campaign to make “nerdster” a thing?) It also might say something practical about how more-powerful browsers really could change the way we share music tools. Native software still seems perfectly safe from the browser; we still use native tools for desktop and mobile. But I’ve yet to see someone make good use of the Web as a teaching tool, or to share work. This is a reminder of what’s possible, hyperlinked to loads of tools and code for developers to explore themselves.

And I bet they would make something absolutely amazing, if I didn’t just destroy their productivity for the rest of the week by sharing … this. Wait, I may have just explained why we haven’t seen more Web tools. You read it here firs– hey, stop double-clicking that dolphin and read, darn it!

Details, and links to some JavaScript goodness (and another appearance of the Web Audio API):

Jankenpopp & Zombectro are running the thing,
the Mighty Doctor House is hosting the thing.

Credits

animate.css | CSS animations
GameBoy-Online | GameBoy Color emulator written in JavaScript
www.piskelapp.com | Pixel Art and Animated Sprites editor
threejs.org | JavaScript 3D library
codemirror.net | text editor implemented in JavaScript for the browser
codef.santo.fr | Canvas Oldshool Demo Effect Framework
www.asciimation.co.nz | Star Wars Asciimation
jGravity | A jQuery Gravity Plugin
howler.js | Modern Web Audio Javascript Library

Many are still missing… we’ll try to credit everyone soon :)
If we forgot you, we’re sorry, you can ask us a link at contact@windows93.net

http://www.windows93.net

The post Windows 93 OS in Your Browser Comes with LSDJ, Pd, Nanoloop Music Apps appeared first on Create Digital Music.

by Peter Kirn at October 28, 2014 11:31 AM

October 26, 2014

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

New LP from Little Pony released, produced by Red Plastic Label

Little Pony have just released their new LP titled "WE ALL FALL DOWN: Strade, Rane, Principi e Dame". Little Pony are a band from Naples, Italy. Their sound is not easily defined but they draw influences from rock, funk, jazz and blues.

by Conor at October 26, 2014 03:13 PM

October 25, 2014

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

Carla 2.0 beta3 is here!

Carla 2.0 beta3 has arrived. There have been quite a few nice features implemented since beta2.
  • Internal patchbay mode
  • Carla as VST plugin (Linux only)
  • Carla LMMS plugin
  • New and updated skins
  • Old non-skin mode
  • New time panel

by Conor at October 25, 2014 01:45 PM

Nothing Special

My First Linux Audio Tutorial Video

I like that title. It makes me think of chunky toys and blocky characters with big eyes. But this is much less cute than my kids playthings: I made a video to introduce my infamous plugins. Here is the video. How I did it is below.
(if you can't see the embeded player here's the link: http://youtu.be/oHCPgh9HRAQ )
EDIT: The second one is done now too. See  http://youtu.be/izyf27eLPPA



This example isn't perfect, since I had to do a little editing in kdenlive and chose a poor output resolution and format (720p mp4). It looks ok in small screens but full screen looks pretty rough. But the point is that it is perfectly synchronized to the jack audio. The raw clips look great. This can only be accomplished through ffmpeg. With a patch. But it IS possible and here's how (using kxstudio):

#get tools and source
sudo apt-get install yasm libvorbis-dev libx263-dev libxfixes-dev
libmp3lame-dev 
 wget http://ffmpeg.org/releases/ffmpeg-2.4.2.tar.bz2
tar -xvf ffmpeg-2.4.2.tar.bz2

#patch the source
cd ffmpeg-2.4.2/libavdevice/
wget http://sourceforge.net/p/infamousplugins/code/ci/2c97af07ea6fb54eca55f6bcdd707a3ad60c0325/tree/test/ffmpeg-2.4.2-jack.patch?format=raw
mv ffmpeg-2.4.2-jack.patch?format=raw ffmpeg-2.4.2-jack.patch
patch < ffmpeg-2.4.2-jack.patch

#build ffmpeg
cd ..
./configure --enable-x11grab --enable-libvorbis --enable-libx264 --enable-indev=jack
--enable-libmp3lame
 --enable-gpl
make
sudo make install
sudo ln -s /usr/local/bin/ffmpeg /usr/local/bin/ffmpeg_harvid

#record a screencast using the current screen
ffmpeg -fflags +genpts+igndts -f x11grab -vsync 0 -r 30 -s 1440x900 -i :0 -vcodec h264 -f jack -ac 2 -r:a 48000 -i screencast -acodec pcm_s16le -r:v 30 -vsync 2 -async 1 -map 0:0,1,0 -map 1:0 -preset ultrafast -qp 0 "thisisonlyatest.mkv"


#compress it for youtube
ffmpeg -i "thisisonlyatest.mkv" -acodec mp3 -ab 160000 -vcodec h264 "thisisonlyatest-final.mkv"


The nice thing is that ubuntu 14.04 and variants use avconv so installing an ffmpeg binary shouldn't get in the way of anything. Alternatively to that last command to record if you use kxstudio or the ppa's use the kxstudio scripts as falkTX described here.

I wrote the patch, but the solution really comes from a patch made by male last year. The patch was incorporated into the 12.04 ppas ffmpeg build, but I am running 14.04 so it no longer applied. Necessity is the mother of invention. And updates. So I just adapted the changes to ffmpeg 2.4.2 (the current release) and figured out how to make it work so that I could start making videos about my plugins.  Anyway the patch should apply to any distro and hopefully this will open the floodgates for many beautiful, perfectly sync'd linux audio tutorials and demo videos.

by Spencer (noreply@blogger.com) at October 25, 2014 10:12 AM

KXStudio News

Carla 2.0 beta3 is here!

Hello again everyone, we're glad to bring to you the 3rd beta of the upcoming Carla 2.0 release.
There have been quite a few nice features implemented since beta2; here are the highlights.

Highlights

internal-patchbay

Internal Patchbay

This new engine processing mode is similar to what JACK does for all clients and what other modular applications do.
Every plugin gets its own canvas group and ports allowing you to interconnect plugin audio and MIDI.
You can use this mode to build complex plugin routing scenarios, perhaps involving several layers of rack and patchbays.

Note that this is currently not available for non-JACK drivers; but for those you can use the internal carla-patchbay plugin.
There's no support for LV2 Control-Voltage ports as of yet, this will be implemented in the next beta together with MIDI-OSC.


new-look

Carla as VST plugin (Linux only)

With the first beta of Carla 2.0 we introduced Carla as a plugin, which worked as both internal and LV2.
Now Carla is available as a VST plugin too, allowing you to load it all DAWs released for Linux.
There are 4 variants: Rack-Synth, Rack-FX, Patchbay-Synth and Patchbay-FX.


lmms-plugin

Carla LMMS Plugin

Carla has an LMMS plugin too, as Carla-Patchbay and Carla-Rack instruments.
So finally you can use native softsynths within LMMS!
The carla-lmms plugin code is already in LMMS and will be part of its 1.1 release.

If you're using the KXStudio repositories and feel like giving it a try simply install carla-git and lmms.


au-plugins

AU Plugins (MacOS only)

AU plugins are working in Carla now.
Carla's plugin compatibility increases once more.


updated-skins

New and updated skins

There's a new OpenAV-style plugin slot skin.
Calf and ZynFX have been updated.
More to come soon.


no-skins

Old non-skin mode

You can now use the old non-skin mode from Carla 1.x series.
This saves space if you load lots of plugins at once.


More stuff

  • New time panel added, but it's very incomplete.
  • LV2 plugin discovery is now automatic, but without plugin checks or testing.
  • LV2 plugins are fully working on MacOS and Windows, including their native UIs (Cocoa and HWND respectively).

There will still be 1 or 2 more beta releases before going for a release candidate, so expect more cool stuff soon!

Downloads

To download Carla binaries or source code, jump into the KXStudio downloads section.
If you're using the KXStudio repositories, you can simply install "carla-git" instead (plus "carla-lv2" and "carla-vst" if you're so inclined).
Bug reports and feature requests are welcome! Jump into the Carla's Github project page for those.

by falkTX at October 25, 2014 12:23 AM

October 23, 2014

Ubuntu Studio » News

Ubuntu Studio 14.10 Utopic Unicorn Released (supported for 9 months)

This release will only be supported for 9 months. Beginning with this release we are recommending our users to stick with the latest LTS release (currently 14.04), since we will be focusing our support on the LTS releases. Nevertheless, we continue to publish a new release every six months. And a new LTS every two […]

by Kaj Ailomaa at October 23, 2014 09:48 PM

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

NASA posts a huge library of space sounds, and you’re free to use them!

NASA has posted a large collection of sounds from historic spaceflights and current missions on their soundcloud account.

For full details, check out Create Digital Music.

NASA's soundcloud account can be at soundcloud.com/nasa

 

by Conor at October 23, 2014 07:59 AM

October 22, 2014

Arch Linux Pro Audio

Update and Interview with JazzyEagle

After a time of silence here on ArchAudio.org, we’re back with lots of news about Arch and using Arch for audio purposes. Actually, we’re gonna do a few little features on users, developers and companies interested in Arch linux for audio projects. Up to date packages for a variety of popular audio programs are available in the ArchAudio repositories.

Interview #1, JazzyEagle

Today we talk to JazzyEagle, an Arch user and enthusiast packager who’s been intrested in Linux since the late 90’s.

ArchAudio: Tell us a bit about yourself?

JazzyEagle: I’m Jason Harrer (pronounced like Harper without the “p”) and I live in the US, around Denver, CO. I work in the HealthCare industry as a Manager of a Medical Claims processing unit. My hobbies are playing/writing music and programming computers.

I got interested in Linux way back in the late 90’s, but thanks to a modem with no Linux support at all, I couldn’t really do anything with Linux, so I gave it up. I tried it again probably about 4 – 5 years ago after someone showed me Ubuntu, and, despite accidentally reformatting the hard drive multiple times when the intent was dual boot, I’ve been running various *buntu distros until I found Arch and fell in love with it.

ArchAudio: How about your musical interests?

JazzyEagle: I listen to all genres, but the ones I like the most are in the grunge/hard rock zone. I do play guitar, bass, keyboards and even accordion. Although I don’t claim to be able to play other stringed instruments, I have been known to pick them up and fiddle with them enough to play what I needed to on rare occasion.

ArchAudio: Wow, that’s a lot of instruments! So where does Arch come into all this?

JazzyEagle: I like the ability to create the system to the way I want it without installing a bunch of stuff I don’t want, as well as the cutting/bleeding edge rolling release philosophy of Arch. I tried Parabola, but I’ve determined that there are some non-free things I like, and so it didn’t quite fit my needs.

Outro

That’s all for now, stay tuned for the next update: about the MOD LV2 guitar pedal, and how it utilizes Arch linux on the inside!

The post Update and Interview with JazzyEagle appeared first on Arch Linux Pro Audio.

by harryhaaren at October 22, 2014 10:42 PM

Create Digital Music » open-source

NASA Posts a Huge Library of Space Sounds, And You’re Free To Use Them

saturnv

Space is the place. Again.

And SoundCloud is now a place you can find sounds from the US government space agency, NASA. In addition to the requisite vocal clips (“Houston, we’ve had a problem” and “The Eagle has landed”), you get a lot more. There are rocket sounds, the chirps of satellites and equipment, lightning on Jupiter, interstellar plasma and radio emissions. And in one nod to humanity, and not just American humanity, there’s the Soviet satellite Sputnik (among many projects that are international in nature).

Many of these sounds were available before; I’ve actually used a number of them in my own music. But putting them on SoundCloud makes them much easier to browse and find, and there are download links. Have a listen below.

Another thing: you’re free to use all of these sounds as you wish, because NASA’s own audio isn’t copyrighted. It’s meant to be a public service to the American people of their taxpayer-funded government program, but that extends to everyone. There are some restrictions – not everything NASA publishes is covered by the same license, though it appears to be on SoundCloud. And you aren’t free to use NASA’s name or logo or imply commercial endorsement. (The Eagle didn’t land on a bag of Doritos.) But that means just about any imaginable musical application is fair game. They do ask you to list NASA as source, but that’s only reasonable. Read their content guidelines for full details.

Let the space remixing begin.

European Space Agency, your move.

Thanks to everyone who sent this in. If you want more, NASA centres all have archival libraries, and the agency has routinely worked with artists and composers to interpret the work they do. See also other research centers around the world. And yes, that’s my Saturn V photo at the top, because, and I’m sure this will come as a huge shock to everyone who reads this site, I’m a big nerd.

https://soundcloud.com/nasa

Have you made music with space sounds? Let us know in comments.

More Sounds

Want more?

It’s slower to browse, but there’s an even bigger library on Archive.org.

NASA Audio Collection

They’re all marked public domain (which is almost certainly the correct license for the above, not Non-Commercial Creative Commons).

It gets weird. For instance, here’s a 1970 comedy skit, produced in-house. And it gets obscure – like briefing audio from a recent ISS mission. But there are some gems in there, too.

NASA also has a small page of sounds that seems to be the basis of the above, but the Archive.org collection is bigger.

The European Space Agency has its own set of sounds, though like NASA, ESA could do some more archival work! (Some of these come from NASA, too.)

The University of Iowa has a selection of space sounds:
Space Audio

The “space sounds” phenomenon here is fascinating: these are radio emissions, but in the audible spectrum – that is, there’s no remapping. You’re listening to a direct recording of those radio signals at their real frequencies, which happen to be ones you can hear. NASA explains how Iowa’s instruments work:

Sounds of Space: New ‘Chorus’ Recording By RBSP’s EMFISIS Instrument

This same technique is the topic of a TED talk (as Professor Donald Gurnett had championed at Iowa):

Artist-technologist Honor Harger listens to the weird and wonderful noises of stars and planets and pulsars. In her work, she tracks the radio waves emitted by ancient celestial objects and turns them into sound, including “the oldest song you will ever hear,” the sound of cosmic rays left over from the Big Bang.

Comments

And yes, in response to comments:

1. Almost certainly, the Creative Commons Non-Commercial license is a mistake – a misunderstanding of how CC works, or confusion with the SoundCloud metadata, or both. (I’m guessing they chose Non-Commercial because NASA doesn’t allow commercial endorsement, but that’s not actually what the CC license is dealing with – and these sounds were already released into the public domain. CC licenses require copyright, which they lack.)

2. Higher-quality audio would be nice. NASA has it, but uploading archival materials requires lots of resources the agency doesn’t have. Research grant, someone? Or should CDM just publish from Houston for a few months and I’ll work on it?

The post NASA Posts a Huge Library of Space Sounds, And You’re Free To Use Them appeared first on Create Digital Music.

by Peter Kirn at October 22, 2014 06:38 PM

Scores of Beauty

Annotating scores

(This is a post in a series about the “Crowd engraving” project “Oskar Fried: Das trunkne Lied”)

For quite some time I had been thinking (and to some extent writing) about the potential LilyPond’s plain text approach offers for implementing in-score annotations. The idea got stuck in a state of initial drafts because it requires Scheme skills that I don’t really have, but our crowd engraving project with the huge score was an incentive for me to implement at least a “working draft”, and as it turned out this was a priceless addition already in this initial state.

The Idea

LilyPond’s music input is stored in plain text files and therefore it is possible (and recommended) to add source comments in the files to document them and make them easier to read and maintain. The most obvious targets for these comments are usually formal hints (measure numbers or structural items like “coda”, “3rd verse” etc.) but one can of course also annotate the content (“is this really a g' or is there a flat missing?”) or issues with LilyPond coding (“I don’t see how to align these two notes properly”). A typical use case are also “todo” comments (“Check this again when line breaking is fixed”). However, the concept of code annotation can be extended by implementing comments that actually do something.

The Implementation

A characteristic of code comments (actually that’s their inherent benefit) is that they are completely ignored by the “compiler” (i.e. LilyPond), and therefore the user can insert arbitrary text there without worrying what the compiler will think about it. But in a way this is also a limitation. Code comments are good to document code for someone who is reading through the specific spot in the code, but they are not useful when you want to actively point others to an annotation.

For this purpose we had already created a few functions in our earlier Oskar Fried project and called the library “in-source-communication”. Basically these were commands that highlight something in the score and produce a message in the console output of LilyPond. That way we had a convenient way to announce things to the collaborators and have these items be tied directly to the music input. For the current project I then implemented some functionality that doesn’t do much more yet but that can hopefully be developed into a really useful feature for scholarly use of LilyPond in the future.

There is a function \annotate that can be used like this:

{
  \annotate \with { type = "musical-issue"
    context = "bassoon 1"
    source = "OE"
    author = "Urs Liska"
    date = "2014-09-13"
    message = "Hairpin missing in OE but present in contrabassoon"
  }
  Hairpin
  f2. ~ \< |
  f1 \!
}

This will highlight the affected grob (here: the hairpin on the f) through coloring (if switched on) and produce a clickable message in the console (if switched on). Through this the compiled score immediately reveals problematic spots in the score, and the compilation output in the console “invites” to browse through issues. There is much more this should/could do, but for now I’m happy that we can at least enter annotations and have these comments as obvious as e.g. an issue tracker while being directly tied to the actual music input.

Practical Implications

As mentioned earlier the original score of Oskar Fried’s “Das trunkne Lied” contains numerous errors or questionable notations. While we are not commissioned a scholarly review our contributors are encouraged to annotate and/or fix anything they notice along the way. This means: If someone notices an obvious error he should fix it – but document that with a critical-remark annotation. If a dubious notation is encountered (e.g. a hairpin that is missing from a voice but present in others) a musical-issue annotation can be added, so the question can be discussed later. In the end all musical-issue annotations should either be turned into critical remarks or discarded. Usually in the workflow the above musical-issue annotation would be processed during review and probably be changed to a critical-remark annotation.

So far (that is with about 60 % of the instrumental parts and none of the vocal parts entered and reviewed) we already have more than 880 annotations in our files! Among these 515 are labeled critical-remark and 300 refer to open musical questions – all of them already peer-reviewed. This means we will probably identify far more than 1.000 errors in the score during music entry alone. I find this is a remarkable number, given that our team has few professional musicologists and that we didn’t even start doing something like an explicit scholarly review.
I’m quite sure these wouldn’t help us as much if they were entered as plain code comments. Having them encapsulated in explicit commands instead makes them ready for further elaboration and processing.

Need for a GUI

Apart from many new functions that I would like to have there is one thing that makes working with \annotate still somewhat unsatisfactory: it’s quite verbose. I mean as you can see above adding an annotation implies writing quite some code, a lot of which is actually redundant. The musical context could be determined from the file, the author and date could be retrieved from the version control commit. In theory one could even write the annotation text in the commit message. Not all of this would be equally useful or practical, but in the end it’s tedious and somewhat error-prone to enter lots of annotations. I’m sure if it were more straightforward to add an annotation we’d have an even lower threshold and higher number.

One solution to this which I want to develop (but I doubt I’ll be ready with it in our current project) is a graphical interface to annotations to be used in Frescobaldi. This will then provide right-click access to an annotation editor where things like annotation type or author can be chosen from a dropdown, while date and context will be inferred from the actual environment. Having annotations directly in the music input is a conceptual advantage over other approaches where one has to maintain the music and the scholarly review separately, but having graphical access directly from the score view will make that unbeatably natural.

Prospect

I will only touch the potentials of \annotate, but if someone is interested in this kind of functionality and has the necessary Scheme skills available at his fingertips I’d be more than happy about assistance in developing this further.

One of the next things to do is making the function aware of the annotation type. Depending on that it could then respond individually. E.g. musical-issue annotations would be colored only while developing the score while critical-remark annotations would call an “editorial function” on the affected grob, so that for example slurs annotated with a critical remark are dashed automatically. It would also be great if annotations could directly create footnotes or print annotations directly in the score, possibly on a separate PDF layer.

Another wish is outputting annotations to separate files, together with the position in the score which should be retrieved by LilyPond when it compiles the score. This would result in viewable files with annotations, grouped by type and sorted by measure, which provide point-and-click support to directly navigate to the annotated music.

Finally the output of critical remarks should possibly be done in a way that it can directly be used from a LaTeX document and used in a critical report. If that’s possible I could finally edit the critical report directly in the score, with everything documented and maintained in version control’s safety net. This would (will?) really be a killer application for scholarly edition!

by Urs Liska at October 22, 2014 12:22 PM

Linux Audio Users & Musicians Video Blog

The Passion of Raul

Raul is a Vampire who is driven by his unquenchable passion in the dead of night.

This is a re-edit of an earlier private work titled “Rauls Redemption” by Volker Allert, a renown physical effects creator for the Hollywood film industry.

All audio recorded with Linux tools and edited in Blender on Linux of course.

by DJ Kotau at October 22, 2014 08:01 AM

October 21, 2014

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] ANN: SEAMUS 2015 -- Call for submissions

From: Ivica Bukvic <ico@...>
Subject: [LAA] ANN: SEAMUS 2015 -- Call for submissions
Date: Oct 21, 6:34 pm 2014

--047d7bfced1ca9620a0505ee2106
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8

Apologies for x-posting:

The SEAMUS 2015 conference will be held at Virginia Tech during March
26-28, 2015. The conference theme is "Emotion and Electroacoustic Music."
The submission deadline is October 31, 2014. Please see http://
seamus.music.vt.edu
/main/
for further details on the conference, and http://
www.seamusonline.org/
for further information about SEAMUS.

Any questions regarding the conference may be directed to seamus@
music.vt.edu .

Best,

Ico

--047d7bfced1ca9620a0505ee2106
Content-Type: text/html; charset=UTF-8
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Apologies for x-posting:


The SEAMUS 2015 conference will be held at Virginia Tech dur=
ing March 26-28, 2015. The conference theme is "Emotion and Electroaco=
ustic Music." The submission deadline is October 31, 2014. Please see =
http://
eamus.music.vt.edu/main/">seamus.music.vt.edu

usic.vt.edu/main/">/main/
for further details on the conference, and
href=3D"http://www.seamusonline.org/">http://

musonline.org/">www.seamusonline.org

org/">/
=C2=A0for further information about SEAMUS.


Any questions regarding the conference may be directed to=C2=
=A0seamus@
us@music.vt.edu">music.vt.edu
.


Best,


Ico



--047d7bfced1ca9620a0505ee2106--

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October 21, 2014 07:00 PM

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

Synthtopia launch their "What's The Best Desktop Daw" of 2014 poll

A few days ago, Synthtopia put out their annual poll to find out what users think the best DAW is. Ardour is in the list amongst others, but there is also a "Other" option where you can submit software not already included in the list.

by Conor at October 21, 2014 07:12 AM

October 20, 2014

Scores of Beauty

“Segmented Workflows”

OK, the title of this post seems to be a cheap pun because it refers to the previous post about the “Segment Grid” approach. But in a way it is quite appropriate because that approach allows us to split our workflow into similarly arbitrary segments as the segment grid in the score suggests.

As described in the previous post we have sliced our score into pieces, more concretely a grid of segments containing one “voice” for the length of one rehearsal mark each. Any segment that has been entered will automatically be placed in the score, replacing a previously empty spot. I have already mentioned a few of the advantages this approach provides:

  • It’s straightforward to distribute work on any number of contributors.
  • The complexity of the file an individual contributor has to deal with at a time is dramatically reduced.
  • The contributor doesn’t have to worry about a consistent stream of music throughout the whole part (i.e. he doesn’t have to worry about breaking anything when editing the individual file).
  • If timing errors are introduced they are immediately noticed (when compiling a whole part or the score) and can be easily tracked down and fixed.

But of course there is much more to it than that, particularly because we also have version control at our disposition.

Constant Peer Review

It is not possible to produce a score of such dimensions without making errors. We can also see that from the original score, in which numerous errors have even survived until today. And even the most scrupulous contributor will be faced with musical issues in the score that he or she wouldn’t want to decide alone. Deferring evertyhing to the “one grand proof-reading” after music entry is completed looks like hara-kiri, and it turns out that two decisions have been extremely valuable: implementing an annotation infrastructure and integrating permanent peer review in our workflow. The first item will get its own post, today I’ll talk about the latter.

As usual in versioned workflows all work happens in the context of working branches. That means there is an “official” state of the project which is represented by the master branch, and work of the contributors will only be included in this official state when it has been completed. So the public surface of the project is always in a consistent state but it doesn’t reflect all the latest work that has already been done.
To improve quality control we have installed a workflow of continuous peer review. Anyone who has finished some work is not allowed to merge that into master alone, instead someone else has to review the material first. This guarantees that everything in the official score has been seen by at least two pairs of eyes, and it has become clear that it is much easier to manage and to maintain that paradigm if peer review is going on constantly, in digestible chunks of 1-10 segments each.

The peer review process has also proven to be an appropriate place to discuss musical issues with the original score. We are not commissioned to do a scholarly review (so far), but it became apparent that it is not practically possible to copy a flawed score literally. People tend to spot many of the more and of the less apparent issues with the manuscript. The level of detail and attention is of course varying but I have been very positively surprised about the quality and amount of annotations that have been made to the score, by contributors who are only partially musicians or musicologists! As said I’ll go into detail about the annotations in a later post, but annotations are inserted in the textual input file (of course) and are highlighted by coloring the affected items in the score. That way it becomes natural to have a second look on them during peer review, so many of these annotations can be approved, discussed or rejected at a very early stage, before the respective material is even merged into the master branch.

Keeping Cool With Project Progress

Doing constant peer review and having the music entry encapsulated in working branches not only improves the quality of the musical text we produce, it also makes us much more comfortable with the progress we make. As said entering the music in segments takes the pressure out of keeping the “document” consistent, but doing that also in branches is a highly efficient safety net for the project management as a whole. An open branch indicates some work going on, and the list of open branches tells exactly what is being done currently. The same way anyone can pick any segment of music to enter anyone can also pick some work to be reviewed, and we don’t have to worry about missing anything. We have imposed a rule that any branch that is put up for review should be renamed to start with review/, so listing all open branches with that keyword tells us what is available for review:

$  git branch -a | grep origin/review | sed 's/remotes\/origin//'
  /review/am/violin1-65-69
  /review/bp/vc1-51-60
  /review/bp/vc1-71-82
  /review/bp/vc2-33-40
  /review/bp/vc2-45-48
  /review/bp/vc2-51-56
  /review/bp/vc2-71-73,81,82
  /review/bp/vc3-46-48
  /review/bp/vc3-51-56
  /review/bp/vc4-46-48
  /review/dl/trombones+tuba-20
  /review/dl/trombones+tuba-21
  /review/dl/trombones+tuba-24
  /review/dl/trombones+tuba-25
  /review/dl/trombones+tuba-26
  /review/dl/trombones+tuba-27
  /review/ks/fluteI-52-56
  /review/ks/fluteI-58-60
  /review/ks/fluteII-53-56
  /review/ks/fluteII-58-60
  /review/ks/fluteIII-60
  /review/ks/oboeI-16-21
  /review/ks/oboeI-25-26
  /review/ks/oboeI-27-32
  /review/ks/oboeI-34-41
  /review/ks/oboeI-45-49
  /review/ks/oboeI-53-56
  /review/ks/oboeI-58-60
  /review/ks/oboeI-II-04
  /review/ks/oboeI-II-10
  /review/ks/oboeI-II-12
  /review/ks/oboeII-16-21
  /review/ks/oboeII-25-26
  /review/ks/oboeII-27-32
  /review/ks/oboeII-36-41
  /review/ks/oboeII-45-49
  /review/ks/oboeII-58-60
  /review/ks/vn1-1_22-31
  /review/mo/violas-76-82
  /review/pc/segment67-86_remove-empty
  /review/pc/segment76
  /review/pc/segment77
  /review/pc/segment78
  /review/pc/segment79
  /review/pc/segment80
  /review/pc/segment81
 
$ git branch -a | grep review | wc -l
46

So we know that currently there are 46 tasks ready-for-review. Some more Git trickery discloses that they contain more than 300 segments of music, so obviously review is currently somewhat lagging behind. This is due to the fact that reviewing is felt to be a task with more responsibility so the majority of contributors prefers entering music. I have always done more review than music entry, but recently I have been quite busy with programming Python tools for our project (that hopefully are generically usable for future projects too) so there has been some accumulation of review tasks. But the point is that this is no reason to worry about since everything is reliably stuffed and organized in branches. Anyone can pick any task to shorten the task list, and when it’s done it will be neatly included in master. The most severe “downside” of the current situation is that the master branch is proceeding slower than the actual work could warrant.

Demonstrating the Stability of the Approach With a Bug

Let me finish this post with an incident we experienced. It was a bug but ironically it’s perfectly suitable to demonstrate the reliability of our segmented approach.

One day a contributor noticed that the score didn’t compile correctly anymore. All of a sudden LilyPond threw tons of error messages about failed bar checks on us, but the actual PDF didn’t show more than one duplicated rehearsal mark and three extra “end” barlines on the last page. Thanks to the Git history it was easy to determine when this issue was introduced, but it was very hard to see why because nothing in that place seemed to be related to such an issue at all. It took us about 24 hours to track down the problem, and it turned out that it actually was a LilyPond bug. In newer versions of LilyPond you can enter “unpitched notes”, that is plain rhythmic values to be used with percussion instruments. We discovered that such notes can – in combination with ties and manual breaks – cause an error in the timing, which caused our score to break without any wrong input that we could have identified. We reported the issue as a bug to the LilyPond developers, and one day later it was already fixed.

While this can serve as a nice example for efficient bug tracking and really snappy “support” and fixing, that’s not the main point in telling that story. The miracle around it is that the whole episode did not affect the work on music entry and review at all. Everybody who wasn’t directly involved in finding the bug could simply continue to work as usual. I admit it has been a very long time since I worked with graphical score editors, but I’d never want to imagine the impact of such a situation if our score would be developed in a huge Finale or Sibelius document.

Next time I will tell you about our system of in-file annotations. This is very much a work in progress, and I would love to have it developed much further, but it serves us really well already in its present state.

by Urs Liska at October 20, 2014 03:15 PM

GStreamer News

gst-validate, gst-editing-services, gst-python and gnonlin 1.4.0 stable release

The GStreamer team is pleased to announce the new the stable 1.4 release of gst-editing-services, gst-python, gnonlin, and GstValidate. The 1.4 release series is adding new features on top of the 1.0 and 1.2 series and is part of the API and ABI-stable 1.x release series of the GStreamer multimedia framework.

Check out the release notes for gst-editing-services, gnonlin, gst-python, gst-validate, and download tarballs for gst-editing-services, gnonlin, gst-python. gst-validate.

October 20, 2014 12:00 PM

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] QjackCtl 0.3.12 released, feat. JACK Pretty-names aliasing

From: Rui Nuno Capela <rncbc@...>
Subject: [LAA] QjackCtl 0.3.12 released, feat. JACK Pretty-names aliasing
Date: Oct 20, 7:44 am 2014

Again, a classic needs no introduction...

QjackCtl 0.3.12 is now released!

Change-log:
- JACK client/port pretty-name (metadata) support is being introduced
and seamlessly integrated with old Connections client/port aliases
editing (rename) (refactored from an original patch by Paul Davis,
thanks). (EXPERIMENTAL)
- Application close confirm warning is now raising the main window as
visible and active for due top level display, especially applicable when
minimized to the system tray.
- Messages standard output capture has been slightly improved as for
non-blocking i/o, whenever available.
- Translations install directory change.
- Allow the build system to include an user specified LDFLAGS.
- Missing input/output-latency parameter settings now settled for the
D-BUS controlled JACK server and firewire back-end driver.

Website:
http://qjackctl.sourceforge.net

Project page:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/qjackctl

Downloads:
- source tarball:
http://downloads.sourceforge.net/qjackctl/qjackctl-0.3.12.tar.gz
- source package (openSUSE 13.1):

http://downloads.sourceforge.net/qjackctl/qjackctl-0.3.12-21.rncbc.suse131.src.rpm
- binary packages (openSUSE 13.1):

http://downloads.sourceforge.net/qjackctl/qjackctl-0.3.12-21.rncbc.suse131.i586.rpm

http://downloads.sourceforge.net/qjackctl/qjackctl-0.3.12-21.rncbc.suse131.x86_64.rpm

Weblog (upstream support):
http://www.rncbc.org

License:
QjackCtl is free, open-source software, distributed under the terms
of the GNU General Public License (GPL) version 2 or later.

See also:
http://www.rncbc.org/drupal/node/826


Enjoy && Have fun!
--
rncbc aka Rui Nuno Capela
rncbc@rncbc.org
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October 20, 2014 08:00 AM

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

QjackCtl 0.3.12 released

Qjackctl version 0.3.12 has just been announced. This release includes the following changes -

by Conor at October 20, 2014 07:45 AM

October 19, 2014

rncbc.org

QjackCtl 0.3.12 released, feat. JACK Pretty-names aliasing

Again, a classic needs no introduction...

QjackCtl 0.3.12 is now released!

Change-log:

  • JACK client/port pretty-name (metadata) support is being introduced and seamlessly integrated with old Connections client/port aliases editing (rename) (refactored from an original patch by Paul Davis, thanks). (EXPERIMENTAL)
  • Application close confirm warning is now raising the main window as visible and active for due top level display, especially applicable when minimized to the system tray.
  • Messages standard output capture has been slightly improved as for non-blocking i/o, whenever available.
  • Translations install directory change.
  • Allow the build system to include an user specified LDFLAGS.
  • Missing input/output-latency parameter settings now settled for the D-BUS controlled JACK server and firewire back-end driver.

Flattr this

Website:

http://qjackctl.sourceforge.net

Project page:

http://sourceforge.net/projects/qjackctl

Downloads:

Weblog (upstream support):

http://www.rncbc.org

License:

QjackCtl is free, open-source software, distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL) version 2 or later.

Enjoy && Have fun!

by rncbc at October 19, 2014 08:00 PM

Recent changes to blog

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] 2015 ASCAP/SEAMUS Student Commission Competition

From: Per Bloland <per.bloland@...>
Subject: [LAA] 2015 ASCAP/SEAMUS Student Commission Competition
Date: Oct 19, 9:49 am 2014


--Apple-Mail=_C29FBC63-CE49-4C7D-A48E-5B95290A9627
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset=windows-1252

(apologies for cross-postings)

The Society for Electro-Acoustic Music in the United States (SEAMUS) is =
pleased to announce the 2015 ASCAP/SEAMUS Student Composer Commissioning =
Program.

The purpose of this program is to stimulate student participation in =
SEAMUS activities, and to encourage young composers to pursue creative =
endeavors in electro-acoustic music. The program is administered by =
SEAMUS and funded by the American Society of Composers, Authors and =
Publishers (ASCAP) .

The submission deadline is October 31, 2014.

For more information, please visit the ASCAP/SEAMUS Competition =
information page .
To submit via the online application, please visit the current =
submission site.

Please note that you must be a current member of SEAMUS to submit to the =
competition. You can join or renew your membership at the newly =
redesigned SEAMUS website, http://www.seamusonline.org/. Joining takes =
only a few minutes. You must supply your seamusonline username to =
complete your submission. (Your seamusonline username is independent of =
your Start Conference, submission username.)

If you submitted to the 2014 SEAMUS Conference at Wesleyan, your Start =
Conference submission username and password are still valid.


RULES FOR SUBMISSION

All submissions are to be made online, through the submission site. =
Only one work of electroacoustic music may be submitted, which must =
adhere to the following guidelines:

=95 Audio Files: music submissions should include a representative audio =
recording of the work. If a concert work, it must be the complete =
composition. Installations may be represented by an excerpted recording =
not to exceed 10 minutes in length. Judging of music submissions for =
ASCAP/SEAMUS Student Competition will be from audio files in the MP3 =
format. Multichannel works will be judged from a stereo mix, also MP3. =
Please assist us by submitting in MP3 format. Audio files must be =
prepared as a single LastnameFirstname_audio.MP3.=20
=95 Scores: for submissions involving a score, please submit an =
anonymized PDF score for review. Please do not mail in printed scores. =
Score submissions must be prepared as LastnameFirstname_score.PDF.
=95 Video Submissions: note that for works involving video, only the =
audio portion will be considered for judging purposes. You must be the =
composer of the music for the video. Please submit an MP3 of the music =
as specified above.
=95 Only one (1) entry per student.=20

Other than the filename, please make sure to remove your name from all =
files, including MP3 metadata and PDF scores. Please limit the total =
size of all files to 40MB.

This same work may be submitted to the SEAMUS 2014 National Conference =
via the conference submission page. All finalists in the ASCAP/SEAMUS =
Student Commission Competition must attend the SEAMUS 2014 National =
Conference. Submissions by High School and Undergraduate students will =
automatically be considered for the Allen Strange Memorial Award as =
well.


AWARDS

A maximum of two prizes may be awarded. The decision of the judges will =
be final.

First Prize

=95 Commission of $1250 for a new work of electro-acoustic music
=95 Performance of commissioned work at the 2016 SEAMUS National =
Conference
=95 Recording of the commissioned work in the SEAMUS Compact Disc Series
=95 Certificate of recognition


message continues]

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October 19, 2014 10:00 AM

Recent changes to blog

Faust to LV2

Creating LV2 bundles from faust source files within guitarix.

You would find the make_lv2_bundle.sh script in guitarix/src/LV2/
Usage is simple, just run

./make_lv2_bundle.sh -p path/to/source/ sourcefile.dsp

to create a LV2 bundle from a faust source file.
The bundle will appear in the guitarix/src/LV2 directory and comes with a included makefile to build the bundle independent, as well it include a wscript to include the bundle into the guitarix build environment.

To test your plug you could install it as user to (~/.lv2) (make install) remove it with make uninstall.

The LV2 plug wouldn't have a GUI, but it is prepared for the use within the MOD SDK to add a MOD UI.

by brummer at October 19, 2014 03:51 AM

October 18, 2014

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] Drumstick Metronome 1.0.0 released

From: Pedro Lopez-Cabanillas <pedro.lopez.cabanillas@...>
Subject: [LAA] Drumstick Metronome 1.0.0 released
Date: Oct 18, 7:52 am 2014

Drumstick Metronome is a MIDI metronome with Qt5 user interface, based on the
ALSA sequencer, formerly named KMetronome.

Changes in 1.0.0
* Migrated to Qt5, removing KDE dependencies.

Copyright (C) 2005-2014, Pedro Lopez-Cabanillas
License: GPL v2

More info
http://kmetronome.sourceforge.net/kmetronome.shtml

Sources
http://sourceforge.net/projects/kmetronome/files/kmetronome/1.0.0/

Regards,
Pedro
_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-announce mailing list
Linux-audio-announce@lists.linuxaudio.org
http://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-announce

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October 18, 2014 08:00 AM

October 17, 2014

m3ga blog

Haskell : A neat trick for GHCi

Just found a really nice little hack that makes working in the GHC interactive REPL a little easier and more convenient. First of all, I added the following line to my ~/.ghci file.


  :set -DGHC_INTERACTIVE

All that line does is define a GHC_INTERACTIVE pre-processor symbol.

Then in a file that I want to load into the REPL, I need to add this to the top of the file:


  {-# LANGUAGE CPP #-}

and then in the file I can do things like:


  #ifdef GHC_INTERACTIVE
  import Data.Aeson.Encode.Pretty

  prettyPrint :: Value -> IO ()
  prettyPrint = LBS.putStrLn . encodePretty
  #endif

In this particular case, I'm working with some relatively large chunks of JSON and its useful to be able to pretty print them when I'm the REPL, but I have no need for that function when I compile that module into my project.

October 17, 2014 10:16 PM

October 16, 2014

Scores of Beauty

The “Segment Grid” Approach

This is a post in a series about the “Crowd engraving” project “Oskar Fried: Das trunkne Lied”

Ever since I started using version control for working with scores I mused about the potential this might have on a “community” approach to editing musical scores. In our edition of Oskar Fried’s songs I already enjoyed the positive impact on collaboration, but basically we had a team of only two people with more or less fixed roles: I was responsible for producing the content, Janek had to beautify the output. However, along the way I learned to enjoy the freedom and comfort LilyPond and Git offered as a reliable safety net when our roles started to blur to a small extent. I could make suggestions regarding LilyPond coding, and Janek reported issues with the content more than once. This triggered ideas about making musical editing team-ready the same way as software development works. The task of creating a huge orchestral score was a welcome opportunity to develop new tools and workflows. Today I will give you an idea about the fundamental concept of slicing the score into a “segment grid”.

A Huge Score

Being confronted with a large score may look daunting in the first place. Oskar Fried’s “Das trunkne Lied” is a composition for vocal soloists, multiply split choir (with eight solo voices) and large orchestra. It has nearly 150 pages, and you can have a look at one – admittedly more crowded than average – by clicking on the thumbnail below:

Page from

Page from “Das trunkne Lied”. Click to enlarge.

In order to manage that beast and to make it accessible to efficient collaboration I created a framework built on the fundamental concept of slicing the score into a “segment grid”. This makes heavy use of the advantages offered by LilyPond’s plain text approach and version control as described over and over again on this blog.

Working With the Grid

It is quite obvious how to conceive such a grid (although I’m not sure it’d be as obvious to users of traditional graphical notation packages). A score is naturally organized in a set of “voices” or “parts” – any LilyPond user would enter each part in a separate music variable and maintain it in its own file. But a score usually is also organized over time, usually with rehearsal marks, which form a natural way to define the “columns” of our grid. In our score we have 90 of these columns, so we can address any “cell” of the grid directly like “segment 47 of clarinet 1″ etc. My goal was to make each of these cells editable individually in order to make the tasks more manageable to individual contributors and to make the best out of version control.

Individual Segment files

Maintaining each segment in its own LilyPond input file offers several nice goodies. Each file is small and manageable so they are also accessible to users with less experience who’d be overwhelmed by having to handle an 800 measures part. Being able to compile each segment standalone greatly reduces the time spent waiting for LilyPond to recompile the stuff currently being worked on (which is actually one of the more annoying limitations when using LilyPond for larger scores). In terms of version control maintaining many small files reduces the risk of running into merge conflicts, which improves reliability and maintainability of the project. And finally this approach provides a maximum amount of stability when “filling up” the score – which I’ll talk about a little bit later.

Compiling standalone segments

For editing the segments as standalone files I wrote a Scheme function \compileSegment which takes some music input and compiles it as a standalone score. This in itself wouldn’t be interesting at all, but I set it up so it only does something when we want the file to be compiled standalone. When we use the segment file as part of the whole, this function simply does nothing. So basically we have a structure of the music file that looks like this:

% Include function to compile the segment standalone (e.g. for proof-reading)
\include "makescore/compile-segment.ily"

% Please check the reference pitch of \relative
XXVII = \relative c {
  % The music of the segment
}

\compileScore \XXVII

(If you want to see the details of this \compileSegment function, you can check it out here.)

When used as part of the full score (or full part), this file effectively yields just the \XXVII variable – but when compiling the file directly LilyPond uses \compileScore (together with some style sheets and templates) to produce an output of that segment alone, as you can see from the following screenshot:

Individual segment in Frescobladi (click to enlarge)

Individual segment in Frescobladi (click to enlarge)

When looking at this you may notice a few things, first of all the extent of the score. The segment is defined to comprise the viola 1 music from rehearsal mark 26 to 27, but actually it starts a little earlier and stops a little later. This is done to let LilyPond engrave spanners that go over the segment borders, in this case some slurs and ties but there could be dynamics too. For this to happen the segment files contain additional variables \opening and \closing that can be left empty or can contain such “transition objects”. (So the actual structure of the file is somewhat more complicated than listed above.)

The next thing you may be wondering about is the peculiar layout of the systems, ragged-right and with a seemingly arbitrary number of bars per line. Actually this is one of the coolest aspects of our approach. There are custom commands for entering the line and page breaks of the original score, and with that LilyPond will create scores that match the line and (optionally) page breaking of the manuscript we’re copying from. This makes it much easier to navigate and to match the compiled output to the position in the score. The behaviour of this and other aspects is centrally managed in initialization files so once the musical editing is done we can simply switch that feature off and let LilyPond calculate the optimal line breaking for us – but I’ll talk about this aspect of the set-up in a later post.

I will probably come back to this screenshot as it shows a few more things that should be covered separately.

Creating voices and parts

How does LilyPond and the project know about the structure of the composition and the score? Do we have to create such a segment file manually? Of course not – this would be way too tedious and error-prone. Instead there is one template, consisting of 90 music variables that define all the time and key signatures, original breaks, rehearsal marks and tempo indications (the actual implementation is slightly different but as this is not a tutorial I’ll be somewhat generous with the details). The actual music in that template is defined as spacer rests (for non-LilyPond-users: spacer rests take up the rhythmic value they contain but do not print anything). A Python script can then be used to generate a complete part from that, creating 90 empty segment files with all the default content and some instrument specific settings such as transposition or initial clef.

The person entering the music now “only” has to replace these spacer rests with the actual music, without introducing any errors in the timing (for example by replacing five measures of spacer rests with four measures of music).

To create an instrumental part from that, there is a file that reads in all those 90 segment files and concatenates them to a continuous voice which can then be used in a standalone part or in the score. Initially this looks like the following “empty” part:

Empty

Empty “part”, containing no music but the whole structure (click to enlarge)

As you can see this too respects the original breaks of the score, and additionally it prints the original page number where you’d usually have the abbreviated instrument name. This way it’s really easy to navigate between the manuscript and the compiled part. (If you want you can place this PDF side by side with the single score page from the top of this post and inspect their relation.) As the generated empty files are automatically equipped with \barNumberCheck commands any timing errors in the segment files would immediately become apparent once the whole part is compiled – and can easily be fixed without having to worry at all about breaking the layout of the score.

Drop-In of Really Empty Segments

In an orchestral score the instruments do not play all the time, so there are many occasions where instruments do pause and where the spacer rests from the template would have to be replaced with real multimeasure rests. To make this process less tedious I have come up with yet another trick. I wrote about the file that concatenates the segments to a part. When it doesn’t find a segment file in the expected place it will simply load the respective segment from a special template part containing all the segments filled with real instead of spacer rests. This means: Instead of “entering” the “music” for a pausing segment one can simply delete the corresponding segment file! This has the interesting side-effect that when looking at the score or a part you can immediately tell apart segments where the instrument pauses from segments that haven’t been entered yet:

Partially completed oboe part (click to enlarge)

Partially completed oboe part (click to enlarge)

In this oboe part you can see a lot of segments containing rests, a lot of segments containing nothing, and some segments (starting with rehearsal number 41) that already contain music. This points to one huge advantage we have from using a text/compilation based tool such as LilyPond. With graphical notation software it is known to be a quite fragile thing to maintain a longer score: it’s important to do everything in the right order to prevent later changes from breaking any- or even everything done so far. By contrast our approach makes it possible to pick any segment from the whole score to enter – and LilyPond will painlessly place that music at the right place in the score, without any hassles like breaking layout or the like. When later someone enters an adjacent segment they will be simply glued together upon the next compilation!

Prospects

In the next part of this series I will start with the (positive) impact this approach has on the stability of the score and on our collaborative workflows. But I’ll also consider some possible limitations of the approach and discussion of it being too complicated.

by Urs Liska at October 16, 2014 06:51 PM

ardour

Development news: branch mechanics

The cairocanvas branch has been merged into the master branch of Ardour.

read more

by paul at October 16, 2014 09:26 AM

October 13, 2014

Create Digital Music » open-source

Learn to Jam with Just One Synth Voice: MeeBlip + Ableton Push vs. Gustavo Bravetti [Video]

Ableton Live and Ableton Push afford new ways of working, allowing you to put loads of parameters beneath your fingertips. Of course, the means of doing that may not be immediately obvious, behind the dance between grid, encoders, and automation envelopes.

Leave it to Montevideo-born, virtuoso dance music maestro Gustavo Bravetti to show us how it’s done.

Gustavo pairs the MeeBlip SE, the enhanced “digital freak” original version of our synth, with Live and Push. To connect the hardware with automation of the external synth, he uses a Max for Live patch for the MeeBlip (which you’re free to download yourself if you own the MeeBlip/MeeBlip SE).

(The MeeBlip is not the first open source synth, as the video might imply, but could be considered the first widely-produced, ready-to-play hardware synth to be under a fully open source hardware license; others were available in kit form.)

The lessons here, though, work in any hardware synth. And you could also apply them to controllers other than Push, if you prefer.

In particular, note some particular tips:

  • The Max for Live device automates sounds on a single voice by associating melodic steps with different sound presets.
  • Preset automation will overwrite live tweaking, so you can tweak variations freely.
  • Built-in morphing in his patch creates still more variations.
  • You can use this as either a live performance tool or an arrangement tool – and even get obsessive with the latter, since it writes automation envelopes into your arrangement.

Check out the MeeBlip SE Remote patch – for your MeeBlip or another synth, if you feel like learning from it.
Meeblip Se Remote 1.0

It’s funny to hear the original MeeBlip again, as I mostly spend time these days with MeeBlip anode, which is now in stock from us and various dealers in America and Europe. (A sale is on now for US$/EUR€ 129.95.) The original character is still in anode, but the unruly temper is more of the desirable variety, thanks to the new analog filter and streamlined design. (We also abandoned presets, which work better here in software.) And Gustavo promises an anode version soon.

Full description from Gustavo:

The Meeblip Se is an incredible synthesiser with a very interesting and distinctive sound. This sound is produced by (at first sight) a relative simple sound engine… but once you start playing whit its possibilities you realise that this little digital freak with an occasionally fretful temper, has a defined personality capable of a wide range of sonic possibilities.

The Meeblip Se default preset system can store up to 16 presets. To store and recall them, you have to use a combination of buttons and switches. Thinking on use it on my live performances, the Meeblip Se’s default preset’s system seems at first sight to be short-legged, unpractical, and overcomplicated, and in fact… kinda it is!

After creating dozens of very interesting and useful sounds on my Meeblip Se, and realising that most of them was lost in action, I decided to work on an alternative to store, recall and organise my Meeblip Se’s presets. Because I want to use the Meeblip Se on my live shows I also need to be able to recall those presets remotely and/or automatically in any given moment. At last but no least, I want to be able to control all the Meeblip parameters from a most informative surface controller, the Ableton-Akai Push Controller.

Lucky me that all parameters on the Meeblip Se can be controlled with MIDI CCs, the answer was pretty clear, a device in MaxForLive would be able to do all what I need an much more… and that is was bring us here.

Gustavo is an extraordinary producer – proof positive that you can mix hackery with the kind of dance prowess to move festival-sized crowds, all as one artist. (No, he’s not hiring teams of nerds. He’s entirely DIY.) Follow him on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/gustavobravettilive

And I hope we hear more from him soon.

gustavo

The post Learn to Jam with Just One Synth Voice: MeeBlip + Ableton Push vs. Gustavo Bravetti [Video] appeared first on Create Digital Music.

by Peter Kirn at October 13, 2014 03:08 PM

October 12, 2014

GStreamer News

GStreamer Conference 2014: Talks, Schedule and Speakers

This year's GStreamer Conference will take place on October 16-17 in Düsseldorf, Germany, alongside LinuxCon Europe, the Embedded Linux Conference Europe, and the Linux Plumbers Conference.

The conference schedule with full details about talks and speakers is now available on the conference website.

Topics covered include embedded systems, mobile platforms, optimisations, adaptive streaming, hardware-accelerated video decoding, testing and Q&A, OpenGL, editing, digital television support, latest codec developments, stereoscopic 3D video, and many others.

All talks will be recorded by Ubicast.

If you're not registered yet, it's not too late, you can still sign up, see the conference home page for details.

Many thanks go to our sponsors Centricular, Collabora, and Google without whom this conference would not have been possible in this form.

We hope to see you all in Düsseldorf next week!

October 12, 2014 01:30 PM

harryhaaren

Blog Status : Moved, not dead!

Hi all,

Once upon a time I posted on this blog (somewhat) regularly. Currently I dont. Why? I'm running OpenAV Productions, and that is where the updates are!

If you're still interested in Linux audio, C++ programming or software in general, checkout the site:
www.openavproductions.com

Developers may have particular interest in the developer topics like implementing NSM or dealing with memory in real-time.

Audio programming folks, checkout some articles that I've written on the topics of real-time programming, memory management, implementing NSM and more:
http://openavproductions.com/conferences.

I probably won't post here for another long time, so bye for now! -Harry

by Harry van Haaren (noreply@blogger.com) at October 12, 2014 04:46 AM

October 10, 2014

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

Jannis Pohlmann: How I produce music with Ardour

This article is written for all those interested in setting up a Linux home studio and using Ardour to record and mix their music, with the help of numerous free and open source tools and plugins.

I will illustrate my setup and processes based on songs created with my solo band Brittle Giants, covering the recording setup, miking, audio interfaces, Linux configuration, tracking different instruments with Ardour, various mixing tricks using pass filters, equalizers, compressors and more, as well as exporting to WAV and FLAC/MP3.

by admin at October 10, 2014 01:18 PM

Hackaday » » digital audio hacks

Beverly-Crusher, the Greatest Name for an Audio Effect

Image is © aliceazzo [http://aliceazzo.deviantart.com/].

Image © aliceazzo [http://aliceazzo.deviantart.com/].

When it comes to audio effects, you have your delay, reverb, chorus, phasing, and the rest that were derived from strictly analog processes. Compared to the traditional way of doing things, digital audio is relatively new, and there is still untapped potential for new processes and effects. One of those is the bit crusher, an effect that turns 8- or 16-bit audio into mush. [Electronoob] wanted to experiment with bitcrushing, and couldn’t find what he wanted. Undeterred, he built his own.

There are two major effects that are purely in the digital domain. The first is the sample rate reducer. This has a few interesting applications. Because [Shannon] and [Nyquist] say we can only reproduce audio signals less than half of the sample rate; if you run some audio through a sample rate reducer set to 1kHz, it’ll sound like crap, but you’ll also only get bass.

The bitcrusher is a little different. Instead of recording samples of 256 values for 8-bit audio or ~65000 values for 16-bit audio, a one-bit bitcrusher only records one value – on or off. Play it through a speaker at a decent sample rate, and you can still hear it. It sounds like a robotic nightmare, but it’s still there.

[Electronoob] created his bitcrusher purely in software, sending the resulting bitcrushed and much smaller file to an Arduino for playback. Interestingly, he’s also included the ability to downsample audio, giving is project both pure digital effects for the price of one. 1-bit audio is a bit rough on the ears, but 2, 3, and 4-bit audio starts to sound pretty cool, and something that would feel at home in some genres of music.


Filed under: digital audio hacks

by Brian Benchoff at October 10, 2014 11:00 AM

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

MOD DUO reaches funding goal on Kickstarter - one week left for stretch goals

The MOD DUO, a hardware guitar effects unit running open source software, has just reached it's $65,000 funding goal on Kickstarter. With one week left, there is still time to reach it's stretch goals, the next of which is set at $100,000. These stretch goals will allow the MOD team to produce the MOD Duo with even better features, such as a 24 bit USB 2.0 audio interface, a die-cast aluminum casing and a 50% faster processor.

by Conor at October 10, 2014 07:33 AM

Hackaday » » digital audio hacks

The Cassette MP3 Player

cassette

1994 was twenty years ago. There are people eligible to vote who vaguely remember only one Bush presidency. You can have a conversation with someone born after the millennium, and they think a 3.5 inch disk is called a save icon. Starting to feel old? Don’t worry, all the trinkets of your youth have now become shells for MP3 players, the cassette tape included.

[Britt] is aware you can pick up one of these cassette tape MP3 players through the usual channels, but she wanted her build to be a little different. She’s using ar real, vintage cassette tape for starters, and from the outside, looks pretty much like any other cassette tape: there’s a thin strip of tape at the bottom, and the clear plastic window shows the tape is at the beginning of side A.

Outside appearances are just that; inside, there is a small, repurposed MP3 player, with tact switches wired up to the old buttons, actuated by moving the spools back and forth. Yes, you actually play, pause, rewind and fast forward by sticking a pencil in the spool and moving it back and forth. Amazing.

It’s a great build, and considering both cassette tapes and cheap MP3 players can be found in the trash these days, it’s something that should be hard to replicate.


Filed under: classic hacks, digital audio hacks

by Brian Benchoff at October 10, 2014 05:00 AM

October 09, 2014

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

zam-plugins version 3.4, now available

Damien Zammit of ZamAudio has recently released version 3.4 of his zam-plugins suite. These plugins come in LADSPA, LV2, LinuxVST and JACK versions. The suite contains the following plugins -

ZamAutoSat
ZamComp (mono and stereo)
ZamEQ (mono and stereo)
ZamGEQ31
ZamTube
ZamMultiComp (mono and stereo)

by Conor at October 09, 2014 10:30 AM

October 08, 2014

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

Hackaday » » digital audio hacks

Acoustic Impulse Marker Tracks Sounds With a Pencil

Acoustic Impulse Marker (aiming device)

Two students at Cornell University have put together a rather curious sound tracking device called an Acoustic Impulse Marker.

[Adam Wrobel] and [Michael Grisanti] study electrical and computer science, and for their final microcontroller class they decided to build this device using the venerable ATmega 1284p.

The system uses a three-microphone array to accurately position sharp noises within 5 degrees of accuracy. The microcontroller detects the “acoustic delay” between the microphones which allows it to identify the location of the sound’s source vector. It does this using an 8-stage analog system which converts the sounds from each microphone into a binary signal, which identifies when each microphone heard the noise. The resultant 3 binary signals are then compared for their time delay, it selects the two closest microphones, and then does a simple angle calculation based on the magnitudes of each to determine the sounds position.

When the sound is identified, its location is sent to a 180 degree servo, which is geared at a 1:2 ratio to a pencil “pointer” which gives it a full 360 degrees of pointing capabilities.

The system works best for sharp sounds, but occasional picks up speech as well.

[via Hacked Gadgets]


Filed under: digital audio hacks, Microcontrollers

by James Hobson at October 08, 2014 05:00 AM

October 07, 2014

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

Ardroid (Android application): How to use it with Ardour


In this tutorial, I’ll go through how to use your Android device to control Ardour through your network.

Hi!
There’s a great Android application called Ardroid, which is intended to allow your Android device to work as a remote control for Ardour. Ardroid does this by sending OSC messages from your Android device, to you computer running Ardour. Ardour then lets your Android device control it through those messages.

by Conor at October 07, 2014 09:56 PM

Sidechaining in Ardour 3

Ahh, sidechaining! The effect us fans of electronic music fear our partners will discover just how much we actually like, and the effect that makes anti-modern electronic musicians shake from hatred. Sidechaining has many different names (ducking is an additional one), but when I speak of sidechaining, I refer to what’s popularly known as “the cool effect that makes everything pump to the beat in electronic music”. Sidechaining itself though has a pretty wide range of uses outside of just “moar pumpz plx”.

by Conor at October 07, 2014 09:16 PM

Scores of Beauty

Approaching a Big Score (Oskar Fried Again)

Last time I introduced you to our crowd engraving project “Das trunkne Lied.” In this we will prepare performance material for Oskar Fried’s large cantata after a text from Friedrich Nietzsche’s “Also sprach Zarathustra”. Today I will give you some more background on the project from the musical and historical perspective.

Who Is Oskar Fried?

Oskar Fried started into his musical life on a less-than-optimal track, receiving his first education in a third-class “music school”. After being a horn player in an orchestra in Frankfurt and doing some composition studies with Engelbert Humperdinck he lived the life of a bohemien who was considered by his friends as very talented but presumably too unorganized to be successful. Nobody would have expected him to become a central figure in Berlin’s musical life and one of the most influential conductors of the 20th century. Fried’s breakthrough came as a complete surprise: Still living in Potsdam as a dog-breeder he got the opportunity of his cantata “Das trunkne Lied” being premiered by Karl Muck and the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra in 1904. This instantly made him one of the hottest composers around and consequently gave him opportunities to work as a conductor. While Fried gave up on composing some ten years later he launched a world-wide career as a conductor and was a fervent ambassador of the contemporary music of the day, premiering numerous works. For example he conducted the first notable performance of a Schoenberg work out of Vienna (Pelléas und Mélisande op. 5 in Berlin), did the German premieres of a number of Mahler symphonies as well as the first complete recording of a Mahler symphony, and numerous other works by Bartók, Busoni, Scrjabine and others.

In 1934 he emigrated first to the Georgian republic and later to Moscow where he was the conductor of the national radio orchestra for several years – until in 1941 he vanished in circumstances that remain mysterious until today. It’s easy to think of a relation to Germany’s invasion of Russia which took place only two weeks before …

Reviving the Composer Oskar Fried

While Oskar Fried is still actively remembered as one of the leading conductors of the first half of the 20th century his work as a composer has been more or less forgotten over the decades. But in his days he was regarded as one of the most promising talents and can in this respect be compared to Erich Wolfgang Korngold and Rudi Stephan. People were particularly impressed by his spectacular writing for orchestra, which you can experience with the music example I happily present you today.

Oskar Fried: “Verklärte Nacht” (excerpt)
Katharina Kammerloher, Mezzo soprano, Stephan Rügamer, tenor, Matthias Foremny, conductor, Rundfunk-Sinfonieorchester Berlin
Released by Capriccio

I was generously allowed to use that excerpt for this post, and I wholeheartedly recommend buying the full recording. This will not only support the company (which is far from being a “greedy big player”) but will make it more likely that future Fried editions will see the light of day.

Only recently there have been some projects trying to pull Fried scores out of the libraries and make them available again, initiated by the longstanding collaboration between Capriccio and Deutschlandradio Kultur. The first result was the mentioned disc with a number of orchestral works. The intention was to produce a recording of “Das trunkne Lied” as a follow-up project but it wasn’t possible to realize it for several reasons – but mainly because of the complexity and size of the task. For me this had a positive side-effect, though: instead of only recording a number of songs to complete this CD I could produce a whole CD with all songs of Oskar Fried (together with the singers you can listen to in “Verklärte Nacht”) which is expected to be released in 2015. And without this recording project we wouldn’t have had the opportunity to create our award-winning LilyPond edition of the songs!

All these projects involve Alexander Gurdon, a musicologist who has just finished his PhD thesis, a monograph on Oskar Fried. It was he who could convince an orchestra to revive “Das trunkne Lied” in 2015. Das junge orchester nrw will play it in three concerts, one of which will be broadcast by Deutschlandradio Kultur (of course we will announce these events in due time). As there are only a (quite flawed) conductor’s score and a piano reduction available but no instrumental parts we are happy to be commissioned with preparing the necessary performance material together with a reviewed score.

We take this as an opportunity to take the collaborative workflows developed during the songs edition to the next level and realize this as a proof-of-concept project for “Crowd engraving”. Given that – as we have written so enthusiastically – LilyPond’s plain text approach and version control make it possible to adapt workflows from software development, offering so much efficiency, reliability and maintainability to musical work, then it should have huge potential to apply them to collaborative work in larger teams. The foremost question in this context was: How can we set up such a big score in order to benefit most from the collaborative approach, how can we make work scale efficiently with an increasing number of contributors?

So far the results are very promising, and in the next post I will tell you more about how we ripped the score to pieces only to assemble them again as a large mosaic.

by Urs Liska at October 07, 2014 05:59 AM

October 06, 2014

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] Cloud installation in Arlington, VA

From: Ivica Bukvic <ico@...>
Subject: [LAA] Cloud installation in Arlington, VA
Date: Oct 6, 11:21 am 2014

--f46d043c81aa4a98790504a6bc4d
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Apologies for x-posting:

I am pleased to share with you the latest interactive audio-visual art
installation commissioned by the Ballston BID in Arlington, VA. Below is
general info. You can already find some photos online using the
#BallstonCloud hashtag, including ones posted on:

https://

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www.facebook.com

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2659461736066>
photo.php

2659461736066>
?

2659461736066>
fbid

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=3D10152659460131066&set=3D

2659461736066>
pcb

2659461736066>
.10152659461736066

2659461736066>

For those interested in the tech side of things, 50 Raspberry Pis are
running pd-l2ork and are powered via single USB cable, while powering three
80mA LEDs, three photoresistors, one mic and one 4W speaker (amplified via
RPi's USB port). RPi uses a small USB soundcard and a Modern Device shield
which is supported out-of-box via pd-l2ork to provide 10 digital I/Os (with
PWM), and 8 analog inputs (via MCP3008).

Professors Ivica Ico Bukvic and Aki Ishida are excited to announce the
public opening of our newest collaborative installation *Cloud*. The first
weekend in October, a constellation of fifty light- and sound-emitting
*cloudlets* that make up the *Cloud* will fill the central space of Welburn
Square in Ballston, Virginia. This networked artwork is an interactive
project, built and programmed in community workshops led by the artist
team. After it is placed in the square, it will take on a life of its own
as the*cloudlets* communicate with each other and its environment by
exchanging messages of light and sound. Come immerse yourselves in the *Clo=
ud

X0IQ&c=3D819871&destination=3Dhttp%3A%2F%2Fwww.ballstonbid.com%2Fart-projec=
ts%2Fcloud>*
!

*Between Thursday, October 2 and Saturday, October 4*, the *Cloud* will be
at Welburn Square, 901 N Taylor St, Arlington, VA Map

X0IQ&c=3D819871&destination=3Dhttps%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com%2Fmaps%2Fplace%2=
FWelburn%2BSquare%2F%4038.881245%2C-77.11202%2C15z%2Fdata%3D%214m2%213m1%21=
1s0x0%3A0x4994298300ee99e0%3Fsa%3DX%26ei%3DhNwoVJaRHYqMyATRi4GQCg%26ved%3D0=
CHMQ_BIwCw>


Come participate in the Raspberry Pi programming and Cloudlet placing
community workshop on Thursday October 2 from 9am to 5pm (see here

X0IQ&c=3D819871&destination=3Dhttp%3A%2F%2Fwww.ballstonbid.com%2Fart-projec=
ts%2Fcloud>
to
sign up for remaining spots in the workshop). Stay for the Farmers Market
and Oktoberfest also in the square from 3 to 7pm.

Come immerse yourself in the Cloud after 5pm on Thursday, October 2 until
the morning of Saturday, October 4. Light is best seen at night, but the
sound can be [message continues]

read more

October 06, 2014 12:00 PM

October 04, 2014

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] [LAU] Yoshimi 1.2.4

From: Will Godfrey <willgodfrey@...>
Subject: [LAA] [LAU] Yoshimi 1.2.4
Date: Oct 4, 10:30 am 2014

Yes it's up there now :)

The most noticeable change from a user point of view is that individual part
outputs (corresponding to channel sends on a hardware mixer) are no longer
affected by the main volume control. The panel window has also been updated to
reflect this situation, and red 'clip' bars have been added.

The accuracy of peak and clip indication has been improved and decay times
increased to give a smoother, clearer response.

There are the usual crop of small refinements and bugfixes under the hood.

At the moment Sourceforge is still showing 1.2.3 as the latest version,
although 1.2.4 is there at the top of the 'files' list.

This happened once before and can't remember what the solution was. Has anyone
else had this happen?

http://sourceforge.net/projects/yoshimi/

--
Will J Godfrey
http://www.musically.me.uk
Say you have a poem and I have a tune.
Exchange them and we can both have a poem, a tune, and a song.
_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-user mailing list
Linux-audio-user@lists.linuxaudio.org
http://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-user
_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-announce mailing list
Linux-audio-announce@lists.linuxaudio.org
http://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-announce

read more

October 04, 2014 11:00 AM

[LAA] Sonic Visualiser v2.4.1 released

From: Chris Cannam <cannam@...>
Subject: [LAA] Sonic Visualiser v2.4.1 released
Date: Oct 4, 10:29 am 2014

Sonic Visualiser is an application for inspecting and analysing the
contents of music audio files. It combines powerful waveform and
spectral visualisation tools with automated feature extraction plugins
and annotation capabilities.

Version 2.4.1 of Sonic Visualiser is now available. This is a bugfix
release, fixing one serious defect that caused crashes when
rendering certain layers.

http://www.sonicvisualiser.org/

For more information, please read the change log at:

http://code.soundsoftware.ac.uk/projects/sonic-visualiser/repository/entry/CHANGELOG

Sonic Visualiser uses Vamp plugins for automated audio feature analysis.
For more information about Vamp plugins, including downloads and
developer resources, see

http://vamp-plugins.org/

Sonic Visualiser is Free Software under the GNU General Public Licence,
developed at the Centre for Digital Music, Queen Mary University of
London.


Chris
_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-announce mailing list
Linux-audio-announce@lists.linuxaudio.org
http://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-announce

read more

October 04, 2014 11:00 AM

October 02, 2014

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

New Ardour bug fix release available

The Ardour devs have just announced a new bug fix release. This release includes several absolutely vital fixes for bugs could lead to audio and MIDI files being irreversibly deleted from disk. Anyone using earlier versions of Ardour 3.5 are strongly recommended to upgrade.

Along with the few major, and minor fixes, there are also a few new additions, notably new MIDNAM file for Korg Volca series and a new version of Xjadeo, which is used for the video timeline.

by Conor at October 02, 2014 07:54 PM

ardour

Ardour 3.5.403 released

Ardour 3.5.403 is (yet another) CRITICAL bug fix release. ALL USERS ARE RECOMMENDED TO UPGRADE. Additionally, ALL LINUX DISTRIBUTIONS SHOULD IMMEDIATELY UPGRADE/UPDATE TO THIS RELEASE. Distributing earlier versions of 3.5 at this point is irresponsible and risks our users' data.

As with 3.5.380, this release includes several more absolutely vital fixes for bugs could lead to audio and MIDI files being irreversibly deleted from disk.

read more

by paul at October 02, 2014 06:59 PM

Create Digital Music » open-source

USB is the new CV: monome meadowphysics as Modular, in New Video

meadowphysics possibilities from tehn on Vimeo.

Here’s a lovely new monome demo, demonstrating their meadowphysics module interfacing between Eurorack hardware (that’s the stuff with the cables and knobs and things) and monome (that’s the stuff with the light-up grid).

Call your family and random strangers and tell them that today you’re really stoked about “rhizomatic cascading counters,” which is what this is. (In more technical terms, let’s go with “chimey note-y thing.”)

I’ve heard people who don’t like computers much complain that USB is some sort of source of planned obsolescence. On the contrary, with serial and standard class-compliant implementations over serial, USB seems poised to take its place alongside MIDI and control voltage as things that never go away. That’s particularly true of hardware that’s community-supported, user-serviceable, or open in some way (doubly so if its key components are open source).

In this case, swapping USB cables works like swapping other jacks on your modular. As the monomers say:

we’ve introduced a new grid-enabled module called meadowphysics. it is a rhizomatic cascading counter. it’s great for polyrhythmic sequences, evolving drum patterns, and rule-based explorations.

you do not need multiple grids to run several monome modules in your eurorack setup— the USB cable is hot-swappable between modules, and each will continue running when disconnected. swapping a USB cable is as easy as swapping a patch cable.

meadowphysics is available now via our retailers: http://monome.org/order

thank you for your ongoing support and we hope you are all very well.

brian and kelli and trent

mp-full

Full specs on the new module:

retail price: $260
abstract: eurorack format rhizomatic cascading counter for monome grids
requirements: monome grid controller (see note below *)
width: 6hp
depth: 40mm (“skiff friendly”)
power: 12v: 18ma, -12v: 17ma 5v: 42ma (grid unconnected), up to 600ma (grid connected, see note below **)

meadowphysics facilitates the exploration of polyrhythms and rule-based sequencing, producing a wide range of emergent patterns.

a monome grid is plugged into the front panel of the module, serving as a complete interface. the procedure continues running when the grid is disconnected, facilitating both live performance and precomposed playback of generative systems.

as the second module in the grid-based eurorack series, this module highlights the ability to swap the grid between modules rapidly, patching the usb cable much like a 3.5mm cable. this module can be used in conjunction with white whale using a single grid gracefully.

the foundation of meadowphysics is an incoming clock which can be internal or external. seven additional counters can be cross-assigned with this clock to count down an assignable number of counts, which is the primary interface on the grid. when a counter reaches zero, the corresponding output is triggered on the panel. given a flexible assignment method, very complicated long-form mutating polyrhythms can be created intuitively.

in addition a series of “rules” can be applied at the zero count of each counter. the count length can be reassigned– incremented/decremented, randomized, reset to last value, etc. a counter can have a rule assigned to change another counter’s behavior. in this way long evolving patterns emerge.

very simple falling rhythms can also be accomplished in a very straightforward manner. a standard subdivided counter runs as a default behavior.

configurations are preset-able and savable to flash for later recall and instant resume on power-up.

The firmware itself is open source, and there’s full documentation:
http://monome.org/docs/modular

More:
monome.org/modular

The post USB is the new CV: monome meadowphysics as Modular, in New Video appeared first on Create Digital Music.

by Peter Kirn at October 02, 2014 03:27 PM

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

Infamous Plugins, v0.1 - The Eye Candy Release

The infamous plugins have been developed over the last couple years and now
GUIs have been created for them. A fund raiser in the style of the OpenAV
Productions release system
has been started to free the source. The LV2
plugins are already open without GUIs and can be tried and used freely.

The plugins include:

by Conor at October 02, 2014 08:31 AM

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] [LAD] [LAU] Guitarix 0.31.0 released

From: hermann meyer <brummer-@...>
Subject: [LAA] [LAD] [LAU] Guitarix 0.31.0 released
Date: Oct 2, 7:34 am 2014

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
--------------000803080904070202020902
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

The Guitarix developers proudly present

Guitarix release 0.31.0

For the uninitiated, Guitarix is a tube amplifier simulation for
jack (Linux), with an additional mono and a stereo effect rack.
Guitarix includes a large list of plugins[*] and support LADSPA / LV2
plugs as well.

The guitarix engine is designed for LIVE usage, and feature ultra fast,
glitch and click free, preset switching, full Midi and/or remote
controllable (Web UI not included in the distributed tar ball).

Here is the " Ultimate Guide to Getting Started With Guitarix
"

This release fix a bug in the preset naming schema ( vowel mutation in
preset names will crash guitarix) and introduce some new LV2 plugs:
* GxRoomSimulator
* GxDigitalDelay
* GxLiveLooper

Please refer to our project page for more information:
http://guitarix.sourceforge.net/

Download Site:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/guitarix/

Forum:
http://guitarix.sourceforge.net/forum/

Please consider visiting our forum or leaving a message on
guitarix-developer@lists.sourceforge.net


The Guitarix project never accepted Donations, and still wouldn't do.
But, if you ever wished to donate the project, I would kindly ask you to
back the MOD Kickstarter campaign here:
https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/modduo/mod-duo-the-limitless-multi-effects-pedal
to reach this Goal:
>
> If the campaign reaches U$100.000 the MOD Duo will offer an Audio
> Interface from it's USB connection. This means that when you plug the
> MOD Duo to your computer you will be presented with a 4 input audio
> device (two pre-processed + two post-processed) that can be used for
> recording the MOD's audio directly to your favorite software.
>
> Add this to the quality of our analog circuit and you'll have, as a
> free bonus, a professional grade audio interface that if bought alone
> would cost the price of a MOD Duo.
>


[*]Here is a list of all included plugs:


Guitarix tube emulations
========================

12ax7
12AU7
12AT7
6DJ8
6C16
6V6
12ax7 feedback
12AU7 feedback
12AT7 feedback
6DJ8 feedback
pre 12ax7/ master 6V6
pre 12AU7/ master 6V6
pre 12AT7/ master 6V6
pre 6DJ8/ master 6V6
pre 12ax7/ push-pull 6V6
pre 12AU7/ push-pull 6V6
pre 12AT7/ push pull 6V6
pre 6DJ8/ push-pull 6V6
noamp

Guitarix Tonestacks
===================

default
bassman
twin
princeton
jcm800
jcm2000
mlead
m2199
ac30
soldano
mesa
jtm45
ac15
peavey
ibanez
roland
ampeg
ampeg_rev
sovtek
bogner
groove
crunch
fender_blues
fender_default
fender_deville
gibsen
engl

Guitarix Cabinets
===================

4x12
2x12
1x12
4x10
2x10
HighGain
Twin
Bassman
Marshall
AC-30
Princeton
A2
1x15
Mesa Boogie
Briliant
Vitalize
Charisma

Guitarix internal mono plugins
===============================

Mono : Distortion : JCM 800 Preamp
Mono : Distortion : MultiBand Distortion
Mono : Distortion : Multi Band Distortion
Mono : Distortion : Ov [message continues]

read more

October 02, 2014 08:00 AM

[LAA] Infamous Plugins, v0.1 The Eye Candy Release

From: Spencer Jackson <ssjackson71@...>
Subject: [LAA] Infamous Plugins, v0.1 The Eye Candy Release
Date: Oct 2, 7:34 am 2014

--047d7b5d436ea29e7b050463bd80
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8

The infamous plugins have been developed over the last couple years and now
GUIs have been created for them. A fund raiser in the style of the OpenAV
Productions release system has been started to free the source. The LV2
plugins are already open without GUIs and can be tried and used freely.

The plugins include:
-the infamous cellular automaton synth
-the infamous envelope follower
-the infamous cheap distortion
-the infamous hip2b (square wave distortion)
-the infamous stuck (a "sound retainer" effect)
-the infamous powerup and powercut (tape stop and start effect)

Please visit the project website to learn more about the plugins and visit
the donate page to learn how you can help free them.

http://infamousplugins.sourceforge.net

Thanks for reading!
_ssj71

--047d7b5d436ea29e7b050463bd80
Content-Type: text/html; charset=UTF-8
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

The infamous plugins have been developed over th=
e last couple years and now GUIs have been created for them. A fund raiser =
in the style of the OpenAV Productions release system has been started to f=
ree the source. The LV2 plugins are already open without GUIs and can be tr=
ied and used freely.

The plugins include:
-=
the infamous cellular automaton synth
-the infamous envelope follow=
er
-the infamous cheap distortion
-the infamous hip2b (s=
quare wave distortion)
-the infamous stuck (a "sound ret=
ainer" effect)
-the infamous powerup and powercut (tape =
stop and start effect)

Please visit the project website to lea=
rn more about the plugins and visit the donate page to learn how you can he=
lp free them.


Thank=
s for reading!
_ssj71


--047d7b5d436ea29e7b050463bd80--

read more

October 02, 2014 08:00 AM

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

New release of Guitarix, including new LV2 plugins

The Guitarix developers have just announced the release of Guitarix version 0.31.0. For the uninitiated, Guitarix is a tube amplifier simulation for JACK, with an additional mono and a stereo effect rack. Guitarix includes a large list of plugins and also supports LADSPA/LV2 plugins.

This is mainly a bug fix release but it also includes three new LV2 plugins. They are -

GxRoomSimulator (Based on Gardner's room reverberator models)
GxDigitalDelay
GxLiveLooper

by Conor at October 02, 2014 07:42 AM

blog4

exhibition and concert in Berlin 3.-5.October Signs Of Dexterity art festival

the first showing of the installation deStatik in Berlin and a concert by Notstandskomitee are in the talks for early October for the Signs Of Dexterity art festival. DeStatik will be shown from 3.- till 5. October, Notstandskomitee performs Sunday the 5. October 19:00 and share the stage with old tape scene buddy C-Drik.

by herrsteiner (noreply@blogger.com) at October 02, 2014 12:35 AM

October 01, 2014

Scores of Beauty

Crowd Engraving Picking Up Speed

My very first post on this blog was the announcment of a “Crowd Engraving” project: preparing the performance material for the voluminous orchestral score of “Das trunkne Lied” by Oskar Fried. Unfortunately it took a really long time, but now the project has finally picked up speed and changed its status from a task to a “living” project. We will update you with hopefully interesting reports and information on this blog so this will be the first of a series of posts, similar to our series of posts about our edition of the Oskar Fried songs.

Over the last year we have always written about the joy of working with plain text and version control, and particularly what a positive impact this has on our ways of collaboration. Doing that in a team actually takes it to the next level, and I can already ensure you that this really works out nicely :-) .

Apart from the conceptual demands of such an undertaking it also was a technical challenge for me, as I’m now the “root” user of a virtual private server – with all its joys and menaces. There I could set up a LilyPond building environment, run my own mailing lists, and particularly install GitLab. GitLab is an open source application often characterized as a “self-hosted GitHub” – slightly less equipped with features but in the end an equally useful tool. Being one’s own server administrator is challenging but also exciting, and you don’t have to give your data to a commercial provider with dubious Terms Of Service.

When all this was set up I could take the time to fix the project framework, set everything up and write something like a Contributor’s Guide so I could ask for participants on the lilypond-user mailing list. This resulted in an impressive list of around 30 collaborators, although I have to admit that so far only a handful of them has found their way into active and regular contribution. But it really turned out to be an enjoyable experience to collaborate on a score that way, with a number of contributors who (some after some initial learning curve with the tools) work very independently and reliably by now. Like a gardener who has finished the seed I can watch my plants growing, and I can safely assume that while I’m writing this someone in any timezone of the earth is laying his hands on a number of segments. Having established a workflow of continuous peer review and having the power and robustness of LilyPond plus Version Control at hand I can be really comfortable with not having to do everything myself – but I’ll tell you more about that and our innovative “segment grid” approach in the next post of this series …

For today’s entertainment I have used the cool gource tool to generate a video documenting the project’s progress. This tool visualizes the history of a version control repository over time. I’m not sure yet whether this is really a tool and not rather a toy but it’s definitely fun to watch the output.

(we recommend viewing the video full-screen so that you can read the labels)

Around the center of a root directory you see how the directories and files are added and modified, and you can see the users who are doing this. At the top of the screen you can see how time proceeds – but be aware that the (virtual) editor in gource tries to avoid boredom and decides to skip longer periods of inactivity.

You can see that I initially worked on the infrastructure alone and only on May 08, 2013 (0:16) created the first directory with actual music (“violoncello”, in the upper right corner). After a little setting up two initial parts over the next week work concentrated on the infrastructure again.

From June 2013 to August 2014 you’ll notice several small and one huge skip, and only at the end of August 2014 (0:56) you’ll see the appearance of the first contributors. You can then see that the first week of September was one of increased activity with a number of contributors, until on September 08/09 (1:07) things start to go wild.

Over the rest of the video you can see a kind of settlement: Basically all files have been created and are now edited in detail. Also it gives a quite accurate representation on how the project directory is organized, but that’s a topic for next time …

by Urs Liska at October 01, 2014 09:14 PM

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

LMP Asks: Eat the apple – an interview with Red Plastic Label

LMP asks logo.

In an old farm near Milan, Italy, live and work the people at Red Plastic Label, a web-based label that produces and promotes her artists using open source software and creative commons licenses. LMP had the opportunity to ask them what they do, how they do it and why.

The building of Red Plastic Label.

by admin at October 01, 2014 09:11 PM

Sidechaining in Qtractor using Ducka

Ducking is a special application of sidechaining. In this tutorial we take a track with a kick drum – the sidechain – to "duck" (silence) another track with a pad sound. The sequencer we use is Qtractor, the ducking-plugin is Ducka, from the Arty FX plugin suite.

by Conor at October 01, 2014 04:40 PM

Recent changes to blog

Some new LV2 plugs

There is progress in our git repository,

some new LV2 plugs have been added.

GxRoomSimulator

Based at Gardner's room reverberator models,

alternate text

GxDigitalDelay

port of the guitarix digital delay plugin

alternate text

GxLiveLooper

port of the guitarix dubber plugin

alternate text

by brummer at October 01, 2014 05:34 AM

September 30, 2014

Hackaday » » digital audio hacks

The Teensy Audio Library

teensy3_audio There are a few ways of playing .WAV files with a microcontroller, but other than that, doing any sort of serious audio processing has required a significantly beefier processor. This isn’t the case anymore: [Paul Stoffregen] has just released his Teensy Audio Library, a library for the ARM Cortex M4 found in the Teensy 3 that does WAV playback and recording, synthesis, analysis, effects, filtering, mixing, and internal signal routing in CD quality audio.

This is an impressive bit of code, made possible only because of the ARM Cortex M4 DSP instructions found in the Teensy 3.1. It won’t run on an 8-bit micro, or even the Cortex M3-based Arduino Due. This is a project meant for the Teensy, although [Paul] has open sourced everything and put it up on Github. There’s also a neat little audio adapter board for the Teensy 3 with a microSD card holder, a 1/8″ jack, and a connector for a microphone.

In addition to audio recording and playback, there’s also a great FFT object that will split your audio spectrum into 512 bins, updated at 86Hz. If you want a sound reactive LED project, there ‘ya go. There’s also a fair bit of synthesis functions for sine, saw, triangle, square, pulse, and arbitrary waveforms, a few effects functions for chorus, flanging, envelope filters, and a GUI audio system design tool that will output code directly to the Arduino IDE for uploading to the Teensy.

It’s really an incredible amount of work, and with the number of features that went into this, we can easily see the quality of homebrew musical instruments increasing drastically over the next few months. This thing has DIY Akai MPC/Monome, psuedo-analog synth, or portable effects box written all over it.


Filed under: ARM, digital audio hacks

by Brian Benchoff at September 30, 2014 08:00 PM

blog4

Witchfinder General

If you had ever faith in humanity, this film might help you. Witchfinder General from 1968 sports one of Vincent Price strongest and most serious performances in a dark and depressing movie. Absent is his typical overacting style which makes his evil characters kind of likeable or at least enjoyable, this is the real deal, playing the sadistic witch hunting general abusing his power. Prices not getting along with the director Michael Reeves might helped. Its amazing how a movie set in 1600s times during the witch hunt times can be still disturbing, after watching it I was terrified and depressed (well before watching it I was just depressed), its a good party stopping movie and belongs in the list we discussed here a while ago of the movies you should bring your first date, when you want to stay on your own. Very close to the Theatre Of Cruelty. Director Reeves died just some months after the release, some say it was suicide.
Its success created a short lived hype of witch hunt movies, also because they are good excuse to show scantily clad women and violence, most notorious the German coproduced Mark Of The Devil with Herbert Lom, Udo Kier and Herbert Fux!

by herrsteiner (noreply@blogger.com) at September 30, 2014 02:10 PM

Hackaday » » digital audio hacks

Finding a Shell in a Bose SoundTouch

BOSE Bose, every salesperson’s favorite stereo manufacturer, has a line of WiFi connected systems available. It’s an impressively innovative product, able to connect to Internet Radio, Pandora, music libraries stored elsewhere on the network. A really great idea, and since this connects to a bunch of web services, you just know there’s a Linux shell in there somewhere. [Michael] found it.

The SoundTouch is actually rather easy to get into. The only real work to be done is connecting to port 17000, turning remote services on, and then connecting with telnet. The username is root.

The telnet service on port 17000 is actually pretty interesting, and we’re guessing this is what the SoundTouch iOS app uses for all its wizardry. [Michael] put a listing of the ‘help’ command up on pastebin, and it looks like there are commands for toggling GPIOs, futzing around with Pandora, and references to a Bluetooth module.

Interestingly, when [Michael] first suspected there could be Linux inside this box, he contacted Bose support for any information. He figured out how to get in on his own, before Bose emailed him back saying the information is proprietary in nature.


Filed under: digital audio hacks, linux hacks

by Brian Benchoff at September 30, 2014 08:00 AM

September 29, 2014

GStreamer News

GStreamer Core, Plugins and RTSP server 1.4.3 stable release

Note that this announcement includes everything from 1.4.2 too, which was never officially released as some critical bugs were found.

The GStreamer team is pleased to announce a bugfix release of the stable 1.4 release series. The 1.4 release series is adding new features on top of the 1.2 series and is part of the API and ABI-stable 1.x release series of the GStreamer multimedia framework that contains new features. The 1.4.x bugfix releases only contain important bugfixes compared to 1.4.0.

Binaries for Android, iOS, Mac OS X and Windows are provided by the GStreamer project for this release.

The 1.x series is a stable series targeted at end users. It is not API or ABI compatible with the 0.10.x series. It can, however, be installed in parallel with the 0.10.x series and will not affect an existing 0.10.x installation.

The stable 1.4.x release series is API and ABI compatible with 1.0.x and any other 1.x release series in the future. Compared to 1.0.x it contains some new features and more intrusive changes that were considered too risky as a bugfix.

Check out the release notes for GStreamer core (1.4.3), gst-plugins-base (1.4.3), gst-plugins-good (1.4.3), gst-plugins-ugly (1.4.3), gst-plugins-bad (1.4.3), gst-libav (1.4.3), or gst-rtsp-server (1.4.3), or download tarballs for gstreamer, gst-plugins-base, gst-plugins-good, gst-plugins-ugly, gst-plugins-bad, or gst-libav, or gst-rtsp-server.

Check the release announcement mail for details and the release notes above for a list of changes.

Also available are binaries for Android, iOS, Mac OS X and Windows.

September 29, 2014 05:30 PM

GstValidate 1.3.90 release candidate

The GStreamer team is pleased to announce the first release candidate of the stable 1.4 version of the GstValidate developper tool.

This release candidate will hopefully shortly be followed by the stable 1.4.0 release if no bigger regressions or bigger issues are detected, and enough testing of the release candidate happened. The new API that was added during the 1.3 release series is not expected to change anymore at this point.

Check out the release notes for here, and download tarballs here,

September 29, 2014 01:00 PM

Audio, Linux and the combination

The 'MOD duo' on Kickstarter

Hi all,

It's happening : the 'MOD duo' kickstarter campaign is on !
The MOD team has been working on this guitar stomp box for quite some time, and everything they learned from making their prototype (the MOD quadra) has been applied in the MOD duo concept.

And I must say I'm impressed, so impressed that I just ordered one !



Read more »

by noreply@blogger.com (Thijs Van Severen) at September 29, 2014 10:59 AM

Hackaday » » digital audio hacks

The LPT DAC

LPT

About 30 years ago, before every computer had CD quality audio built in, audio cards and chips were technological marvels. MIDI chips, FM synthesis, and synths on a chip reigned supreme but one little device – just a handful of resistors – sounded fantastic. it was the Covox Speech Thing, a simple resistor ladder wired up to the parallel port of a computer that would output 8-bit audio to an external amplifier. [FK] recently built his own Covox (Czech, Google translatrix) with just 18 resistors, and the results sound fantastic.

Instead of fancy chips, the original Covox Speech Thing used the 8 bit parallel port on a PC. Back in the olden days, this was the fastest way to get digital data out of a computer, but since it was digital only, a DAC was required to turn this into audio. A simple resistor ladder was sufficient, and this hardware was eventually supported by the old DOS games from Sierra and Id.

[FK] has a demo of this LPT DAC available here, but we’re not thinking that link will last long. If anyone has a better link, leave a note in the comments and we’ll update this post. Thanks [beavel] for sending this in.


Filed under: classic hacks, digital audio hacks

by Brian Benchoff at September 29, 2014 08:00 AM

September 28, 2014

zthmusic

New song: Never Stop Raising The Bar

I’ve just uploaded a new song to my SoundCloud called Never Stop Raising The Bar. It’s featuring some vocals found online (attribution below), and it was made late this summer. I’ve decided to take a break from trying to make … Continued

The post New song: Never Stop Raising The Bar appeared first on zthmusic.

by zth at September 28, 2014 11:58 AM

September 27, 2014

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] Sonic Visualiser v2.4 released

From: Chris Cannam <cannam@...>
Subject: [LAA] Sonic Visualiser v2.4 released
Date: Sep 27, 8:20 pm 2014

Sonic Visualiser is an application for inspecting and analysing the
contents of music audio files. It combines powerful waveform and
spectral visualisation tools with automated feature extraction plugins
and annotation capabilities.

Version 2.4 of Sonic Visualiser is now available. This release contains
some interesting new features, perhaps most noteworthy the ability to
sonify (play back) continuous frequency curve layers, as well as a
number of bug fixes and code quality improvements.

http://www.sonicvisualiser.org/

For more information, please read the change log at:

http://code.soundsoftware.ac.uk/projects/sonic-visualiser/repository/entry/CHANGELOG

Sonic Visualiser uses Vamp plugins for automated audio feature analysis.
For more information about Vamp plugins, including downloads and
developer resources, see

http://vamp-plugins.org/

Sonic Visualiser is Free Software under the GNU General Public Licence,
developed at the Centre for Digital Music, Queen Mary University of
London.


Chris
_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-announce mailing list
Linux-audio-announce@lists.linuxaudio.org
http://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-announce

read more

September 27, 2014 09:01 PM

PipeManMusic

Sour Dough

I've tried baking sour dough before and it wasn't very successful. Without a doubt it came down to not know how to build a good starter. Recently I started listening to the Stella Culinary School Podcast and following his instructions to make sour dough bread.
All I can say is that:
My first loaf
  1. Sour Dough requires more knowledge than most cooking techniques and can't just be done with a recipe.
  2. Once you understand some of the science it isn't all that hard though.
  3. It is super rewarding to make home made sour dough from local wild yeast.


With an Egg Wash

by Daniel Worth (noreply@blogger.com) at September 27, 2014 02:39 PM

Small business.

Saw this coffee van at my daughter's cross country meet and loved the black board doors.

by Daniel Worth (noreply@blogger.com) at September 27, 2014 01:06 PM

Hackaday » » digital audio hacks

Reanimating a Philips HDD 1420 MP3 Player

philips mp3 player hack

[OiD] had a dusty, old, forgotten Philips HDD1420 GoGear mp3 player kicking around his place. As you can imagine, the battery was dead. He had no charger or connector for the thing, but decided to try to resurrect it anyway.

He thought it would simply be a matter of providing alternative power, but the GoGear wasn’t having it and insisted on being connected to a computer. He had some luck consulting Pinouts.ru and found Philips’ own device manager software, but it still wasn’t easy. The device manager doesn’t work on Windows 7. He tried an XP box, but it didn’t detect the device.

Finally, he discovered that the hard drive was kaput and replaced it with an 8GB Microdrive. That helped, but he still had a hard row to hoe. [OiD] formatted the new HD and gave it the official firmware, but still had to replace some system files according to the Philips manual. He ended up using RockBox to reanimate it and decided to keep it on the device.

There was still an issue with charging, though. It has an IC that handles selection of either the proprietary external adapter or USB power, but the RockBox firmware doesn’t implement switching and defaults to the adapter. Several tweaks and a hacked-in mini USB later, the patient is in stable condition and cranking out the tunes.


Filed under: digital audio hacks

by Kristina Panos at September 27, 2014 02:00 AM

September 26, 2014

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

Sonic Visualiser v2.4 released

Version 2.4 of Sonic Visualiser has just been released. Sonic Visualiser is an application for inspecting and analysing the contents of music audio files. It combines powerful waveform and spectral visualisation tools with automated feature extraction plugins and annotation capabilities.

The aim of Sonic Visualiser is to be the first program you reach for when want to study a musical recording rather than simply listen to it.

by Conor at September 26, 2014 11:56 AM

September 25, 2014

Scores of Beauty

LilyPond’s Look & Feel

As described in the introductory essay on its website LilyPond is modeled after classical plate-engraved scores. This deeply influences the way how LilyPond “thinks” about laying out objects on a virtual paper, but it also results in a characteristic “Look & Feel” that makes music engraved with LilyPond stand apart.

However, while this default appearance is undisputedly of high quality it is (of course) not to everybody’s pleasure, and it can be considered a rather severe limitation that the Emmentaler notation font is so deeply interwoven into LilyPond itself that it can’t easily be replaced with other fonts matching different styles.

But wait a minute: Did I say “it is a limitation”? Well, I have to stand corrected: It was a limitation, and this limitation has gone now! :-)

The Gloomy Days of the Past

LilyPond has a very special relationship to its notation font. For example its source code is managed with the source code of LilyPond itself, and with each build of LilyPond the font is also built newly. But LilyPond is also (to my knowledge) the only notation software that makes use of optical sizes. That means: when printing at very small sizes it uses a font variant with less detail that looks better and somewhat bolder. As a consequence of that approach and attitude the usage of Emmentaler is realized in a very non-standard way, and originally it wasn’t possible to use different fonts to change the global appearance of the scores as you could do with other notation programs.

There has been one approach with one alternative font, Gonville that you could use, but only through a very hacky procedure where you basically made LilyPond think it used Emmentaler. It has been discussed as a severe usability restriction on the mailing lists, and when I talked with representatives of several major publishing houses this topic was one that always came up very early – and it definitely was a potential showstopper.

Unfortunately there hadn’t been any progress in that area because despite of a constant need for switching fonts there didn’t seem a solution in sight. While not qualified impossible it was understood that the issue is quite complex and those who are interested in it didn’t have the knowledge to do anything about it while those who could have tackled the task were too busy with other development tasks. One particular problem was the vicious circle that without fonts it doesn’t make sense to develop a switching mechanism, and without the option to use them it doesn’t make sense to develop fonts …

A First Approach: LilyJAZZ and SMuFL

Some time ago Torsten Hämmerle created a new Jazz font and made it usable with LilyPond (see this post). Some time later Nathan Ho adapted that approach to enable the use of SMuFL compatible fonts with LilyPond, as described in this post.

While this already was a significant improvement – particularly with the expectation of more and more SMuFL compliant fonts becoming available – the approach still wasn’t completely satisfying. It is somewhat unnatural to LilyPond in its technical implementation, and as you can see from the referenced articles it is quite some work to get such fonts to work flawlessly with LilyPond.

The Breakthrough: LilyPond Can Switch Fonts!

This was the situation until quite recently when Abraham Lee came around. He was the one combining the knowledge and tools with sufficient interest in the topic, and he created a working solution that really makes it possible to use LilyPond with different music fonts now :-) .

Starting with LilyPond 2.19.12 you can switch the music fonts as easily as switching the text fonts, and for the current stable release 2.18 there is a simple patch that anybody could apply. In addition Abraham has already supplied a really useful range of fonts that can now be used with LilyPond, and it seems he has found convenient workflows to add more fonts in the future.

It still doesn’t mean you can use LilyPond with any notation font – the fonts have to be set up to be compatible with LilyPond’s metrics and glyph allocation. And there is the small limitation that the new fonts don’t support the optical sizing (they do work but “only” the way notation fonts work in other programs). But having the option to switch fonts that easily, and already having such an interesting array of fonts freely available is nothing less than a breakthrough in LilyPond’s usability!

You get the fonts (and the patch) with a lot more information at http://fonts.openlilylib.org, and I hope that Abraham will find the time to write a post on Scores of Beauty giving us more insights in his motivation, experiences, and the technical background of his development. In the meantime please enjoy the following samples:

beethoven-thumbnail

cadence-thumbnail

emmentaler-thumbnail

gonville-thumbnail

gutenberg1939-thumbnail

haydn-thumbnail

lilyjazz-thumbnail

paganini-thumbnail

profondo-thumbnail

ross-thumbnail

scorlatti-thumbnail

by Urs Liska at September 25, 2014 08:13 PM

September 24, 2014

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] QMidiArp-0.6.1 maintenance release

From: Frank Kober <goemusic@...>
Subject: [LAA] QMidiArp-0.6.1 maintenance release
Date: Sep 24, 7:24 pm 2014

Here is a new qmidiarp release, some small things take some days more than 9
months, don't they?
Along with a couple of (important) bugfixes and changes mainly regarding the
QMidiArp LV2 plugin suite, 0.6.1 comes with only one new feature: the Arp can
now step up and down octaves after a chord has been arped through, nothing
more than what you would expect from an Arp right? Although this is something
that was already partly possible by constructing a rather long pattern, it is
now simply selectable from combo boxes.

The LV2 plugins should now work fine in Ardour, Qtractor and Carla (1 and
upcoming 2) including transport synchronisation and preset storage.

Qt5 build is supported via configure option, but not recommended at the moment
since the LV2 user interfaces wouldn't work in non Qt5 hosts, so basically
nowhere.

Thanks go to the reliable translators and to the bug reporters, but also to
Rui and Filipe for making their plugin hosts better and better.

Enjoy
Frank
_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-announce mailing list
Linux-audio-announce@lists.linuxaudio.org
http://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-announce

read more

September 24, 2014 08:00 PM

GStreamer News

gst-editing-services, gst-python and gnonlin 1.3.90 release candidate

The GStreamer team is pleased to announce the first release candidate of the stable 1.4 release series of gst-editing-services, gst-python and gnonlin. The 1.4 release series is adding new features on top of the 1.0 and 1.2 series and is part of the API and ABI-stable 1.x release series of the GStreamer multimedia framework.

This release candidate will hopefully shortly be followed by the stable 1.4.0 release if no bigger regressions or bigger issues are detected, and enough testing of the release candidate happened. The new API that was added during the 1.3 release series is not expected to change anymore at this point.

The stable 1.4 release series is API and ABI compatible with 1.0.x, 1.2.x and any other 1.x release series in the future. Compared to 1.2.x it contains some new features and more intrusive changes that were considered too risky as a bugfix.

Check out the release notes for gst-editing-services, gnonlin, gst-python, and download tarballs for gst-editing-services, gnonlin, gst-python.

September 24, 2014 01:00 PM

September 22, 2014

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] Qtractor 0.6.3 - The Armed Hadron beta release!

From: Rui Nuno Capela <rncbc@...>
Subject: [LAA] Qtractor 0.6.3 - The Armed Hadron beta release!
Date: Sep 22, 7:11 pm 2014

Ah, the equinox...

Twice a year a cherished planetary alignment checks in on schedule,
once again.

The little rock gets another round from its warmy solar furnax, from
which were forged. The pale blue dot gets yet another round and to no
surprise, another tinier dot gets here around:

Qtractor 0.6.3 (armed hadron beta) is now released!

Release highlights:
* Revamped mixer (un)dockable panels (NEW)
* Plugin preset selection sub-menu (NEW)
* LV2 Time position/transport event support (NEW)
* Constrained plugin multi-instantiation (FIX)
* Automation curve node resolution (FIX)

Qtractor is an audio/MIDI multi-track sequencer application written
in C++ with the Qt4 framework. Target platform is Linux, where the Jack
Audio Connection Kit (JACK) for audio and the Advanced Linux Sound
Architecture (ALSA) for MIDI are the main infrastructures to evolve as a
fairly-featured Linux desktop audio workstation GUI, specially dedicated
to the personal home-studio.

nb. Despite the old Qt4 stance, but still recommended, Qtractor does
build, runs and does it all on Qt5 for quite some time now. However, the
former recommendation prevails as the despicable LV2 plugin GUI
X11/embedding support through libSUIL just does NOT work on modern Qt5.


Website:
http://qtractor.sourceforge.net

Project page:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/qtractor

Downloads:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/qtractor/files

- source tarball:
http://download.sourceforge.net/qtractor/qtractor-0.6.3.tar.gz

- source package (openSUSE 13.1):

http://download.sourceforge.net/qtractor/qtractor-0.6.3-13.rncbc.suse131.src.rpm

- binary packages (openSUSE 13.1):

http://download.sourceforge.net/qtractor/qtractor-0.6.3-13.rncbc.suse131.i586.rpm

http://download.sourceforge.net/qtractor/qtractor-0.6.3-13.rncbc.suse131.x86_84.rpm

- quick start guide & user manual (still outdated, see wiki):
http://download.sourceforge.net/qtractor/qtractor-0.5.x-user-manual.pdf

- wiki (help wanted!):
http://sourceforge.net/p/qtractor/wiki/

Weblog (upstream support):
http://www.rncbc.org

License:
Qtractor is free, open-source software, distributed under the terms
of the GNU General Public License (GPL) version 2 or later.

Change-log:
- Make the mouse-wheel to scroll the plugin list views, when not
hovering a direct-access parameter slider.
- Mixer widget gets (un)dockable Inputs and Outputs panels, also with
their respective title captions.
- Plugin instantiation is now constrained as much to prevent any audio
channel output overriding.
- Existing plugin presets may now be selected right(-click) from plugin
list context-menu (ticket by Harry van Haaren, thanks).
- So-called "painting" over multiple selected event values, while on the
MIDI clip editor view pane below the main piano-roll (eg. note
velocities, controller values, etc.) is now split into two similar
painting modes, whether the sub-menu Edit/Select Mode/Edit Draw is set
on (free-hand) or off (linear).
- Drag-and-copy of plug-in instances across tracks or buses (ie.
cloning) now also copies the direct access parameter setting (ticket by
Holger Marzen, thanks).
- File/Save As... now prompts and suggests an incremental backup name
for existing sessions files.
- Zooming in/out increment is now augmented by whether shift /ctrl
keyboard modifiers are set (on a ticket request by
Holger Marzen, thanks).
- LV2 Time position event messages for plugin atom ports that support it
is now being implemented.
- Attempt to break extremely long audio [message continues]

read more

September 22, 2014 08:00 PM

zthmusic

Video, changes to the blog, and more

Feels like it has been forever since I’ve posted on this blog. Which, looking back on the recent post date, is more or less true.. Well, I’ve been up to lots of different stuff, and time has really been short. … Continued

The post Video, changes to the blog, and more appeared first on zthmusic.

by zth at September 22, 2014 07:01 PM

rncbc.org

Qtractor 0.6.3 - The Armed Hadron beta release!

Ah, the equinox...

Twice a year a cherished planetary alignment checks in on schedule, once again.

The little rock gets another round from its warmy solar furnax, from which were forged. The pale blue dot gets yet another round and to no surprise, another tinier dot gets here around:

Qtractor 0.6.3 (armed hadron beta) is now released!

Release highlights:

  • Revamped mixer (un)dockable panels (NEW)
  • Plugin preset selection sub-menu (NEW)
  • LV2 Time position/transport event support (NEW)
  • Constrained plugin multi-instantiation (FIX)
  • Automation curve node resolution (FIX)

Qtractor is an audio/MIDI multi-track sequencer application written in C++ with the Qt4 framework. Target platform is Linux, where the Jack Audio Connection Kit (JACK) for audio and the Advanced Linux Sound Architecture (ALSA) for MIDI are the main infrastructures to evolve as a fairly-featured Linux desktop audio workstation GUI, specially dedicated to the personal home-studio.

nb. Despite the old Qt4 stance, but still recommended, Qtractor does build, runs and does it all on Qt5 for quite some time now. However, the former recommendation prevails as the despicable LV2 plugin GUI X11/embedding support through libSUIL just does NOT work on modern Qt5.

Flattr this

Website:

http://qtractor.sourceforge.net

Project page:

http://sourceforge.net/projects/qtractor

Downloads:

License:

Qtractor is free, open-source software, distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL) version 2 or later.

Change-log:

  • Make the mouse-wheel to scroll the plugin list views, when not hovering a direct-access parameter slider.
  • Mixer widget gets (un)dockable Inputs and Outputs panels, also with their respective title captions.
  • Plugin instantiation is now constrained as much to prevent any audio channel output overriding.
  • Existing plugin presets may now be selected right(-click) from plugin list context-menu (ticket by Harry van Haaren, thanks).
  • So-called "painting" over multiple selected event values, while on the MIDI clip editor view pane below the main piano-roll (eg. note velocities, controller values, etc.) is now split into two similar painting modes, whether the sub-menu Edit/Select Mode/Edit Draw is set on (free-hand) or off (linear).
  • Drag-and-copy of plug-in instances across tracks or buses (ie. cloning) now also copies the direct access parameter setting (ticket by Holger Marzen, thanks).
  • File/Save As... now prompts and suggests an incremental backup name for existing sessions files.
  • Zooming in/out increment is now augmented by whether shift /ctrl keyboard modifiers are set (on a ticket request by Holger Marzen, thanks).
  • LV2 Time position event messages for plugin atom ports that support it is now being implemented.
  • Attempt to break extremely long audio file peak generation on session close or program exit (as reported by EternalX, thanks again).
  • MIDI Controllers Hook and Invert properties are now properly saved for tracks (after bug report by Nicola Pandini, thanks).
  • A segmentation fault when closing with VST plugins open has been hopefully fixed (after a patch by EternalX, thanks).
  • Messages standard output capture has been slightly improved as for non-blocking i/o, whenever available.
  • Automation curve node editing has been slightly improved in regard to time positioning and resolution.

Enjoy && Have fun.

by rncbc at September 22, 2014 05:30 PM