planet.linuxaudio.org

January 31, 2015

aubio

vamp-aubio-plugins 0.5.0

A new version of the vamp-aubio-plugins is now available for download. Originally created by Chris Cannam, the set of Vamp plugins for aubio have recently been updated with three new plugins:

  • Aubio Mel-frequency Band Energy Detector
    • Low Level Features
    • Computes Energy in each Mel-Frequency Bands.
  • Aubio Mfcc Detector
    • Low Level Features
    • Computes Mel-Frequency Cepstrum Coefficients.
  • Aubio Spectral Descriptor
    • Low Level Features
    • Computes spectral descriptor.

Additionally, two new outputs have been added to the Onset detection plug-in: the output of the onset detection function before and after peak-picking.

More information is available at the new vamp-aubio-plugins home page.

vamp-aubio-plugins 0.5.0 source

Binary for Linux amd64

Binary for Mac OS X

Binary for Windows

January 31, 2015 04:52 PM

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] Linux Audio Conference 2015 - Extension of Deadline

From: Frank Neumann <beachnase@...>
Subject: [LAA] Linux Audio Conference 2015 - Extension of Deadline
Date: Jan 31, 12:22 pm 2015


[Sorry for cross-posting, please distribute.]

The Linux Audio Conference submissions deadline has been extended for
another week! Please note the new deadline:

Sunday, Feb 8th, 2015 (23:59 HAST)

So, if you were considering to submit a paper but couldn't make up your
mind yet, here is your chance to become active! Never forget that this
conference lives through the people participating in it.

February 8th is the new deadline for all submission types: papers,
music, installations, workshop proposals.

Check out the link below for more info:
http://lac.linuxaudio.org/2015/participation

Note that as usual we have created two different OpenConf instances: one
for the submission of regular papers, lightning talks and poster
sessions, and a second one for music, installations and workshop
proposals. For the latter, please also check the detailed instructions
at http://lac.linuxaudio.org/2015/download/lac2015-call-for-miw.pdf.

If you have any questions concerning your submission, please don't
hesitate to contact us at lac@linuxaudio.org, or through our #lac2015
IRC channel on freenode.net.

Please spread this information to anyone who might be interested.

We look forward to your submissions and hope to meet you in Mainz in
April!

Sincerely,
The LAC 2015 Organizing Team
_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-announce mailing list
Linux-audio-announce@lists.linuxaudio.org
http://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-announce

read more

January 31, 2015 01:00 PM

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

Linux Audio Conference submissions deadline extended

The Linux Audio Conference submissions deadline has been extended for another week! The new deadline is Sunday, Feb 8th, 2015 (23:59 HAST) This is the new deadline for all submission types: papers, music, installations, workshop proposals.

So, if you were considering to submit a paper but couldn't make up your mind yet, here is your chance to become active! Never forget that this conference lives through the people participating in it.

by Conor at January 31, 2015 12:46 PM

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] Qtractor 0.6.5 - The Fermion Ray beta is out!

From: Rui Nuno Capela <rncbc@...>
Subject: [LAA] Qtractor 0.6.5 - The Fermion Ray beta is out!
Date: Jan 31, 10:58 am 2015

Spread the word,

Qtractor 0.6.5 (fermion ray beta) is out!

Release highlights:

* MIDI clip record/overdubbing (NEW)
* Extended track multi-selection for mute/solo (NEW)
* VST-shell sub-plugins support (NEW)
* JACK transport start/stop resilience (FIX)

And still,

Qtractor is an audio/MIDI multi-track sequencer application written
in C++ with the Qt4 framework. Target platform is Linux, where the Jack
Audio Connection Kit (JACK) for audio and the Advanced Linux Sound
Architecture (ALSA) for MIDI are the main infrastructures to evolve as a
fairly-featured Linux desktop audio workstation GUI, specially dedicated
to the personal home-studio.

Website:
http://qtractor.sourceforge.net

Project page:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/qtractor

Downloads:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/qtractor/files

- source tarball:
http://download.sourceforge.net/qtractor/qtractor-0.6.5.tar.gz

- source package (openSUSE 13.2):

http://download.sourceforge.net/qtractor/qtractor-0.6.5-15.rncbc.suse132.src.rpm

- binary packages (openSUSE 13.2):

http://download.sourceforge.net/qtractor/qtractor-0.6.5-15.rncbc.suse132.i586.rpm

http://download.sourceforge.net/qtractor/qtractor-0.6.5-15.rncbc.suse132.x86_84.rpm

- quick start guide & user manual (see also: the wiki):
http://download.sourceforge.net/qtractor/qtractor-0.5.x-user-manual.pdf

- wiki (help really wanted!):
http://sourceforge.net/p/qtractor/wiki/

Weblog (upstream support):
http://www.rncbc.org

License:
Qtractor is free, open-source software, distributed under the terms
of the GNU General Public License (GPL) version 2 or later.

Change-log:
- Connections lines now drawn with anti-aliasing; connections splitter
handles width is now reduced; the MIDI connections splitter pane sizes
are now saved and restored properly.
- Extended multi-selection is now featured on the track-list (main
left-pane), primarily allowing for group mute/solo (and monitor) switching.
- Track-list (left pane) header column widths are now saved and made
persistent across application power cycle (double-click reverts to the
old original default).
- Minor fixes on the MIDI clip event list editor, also making sure the
current event is visible on the piano-roll view.
- As long to prevent asynchronous mistakes to JACK transport state
changes, an internal slack-delay is now introduced after self-initiated
transport commands (eg. start/stop).
- The MIDI clip editor (aka. piano-roll) was missing to clear or reset
the current selection when no shift/ctrl keyboard modifier is in effect.
- VST-shell sub-plugins are now supported (as suggested by abique aka.
Alexandre Bique, thanks).
- MIDI clip record/overdubbing is now possible (Clip/Record on the main
menu or File/Record from the MIDI clip editor.
- Make sure some audio sample file encodings (eg. old Ogg Vorbis) does
not head-start on audio peak generation.


See also:
http://www.rncbc.org/drupal/node/858


Enjoy && have fun.
--
rncbc aka. Rui Nuno Capela
_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-announce mailing list
Linux-audio-announce@lists.linuxaudio.org
http://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-announce

read more

January 31, 2015 11:00 AM

January 30, 2015

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

Calf Studio Gear: New Plug-In - Envelope Filter

A brand new plugin, an envelope filter, has been added to the Calf Studio Gear plugins. This is still a work in progress but is hoped to be included in the up and coming 0.0.60 Calf release.

Features include -

by Conor at January 30, 2015 08:20 PM

AV Linux 2015

Glen MacArthur has just posted some interesting and exciting news about the future of AV Linux. The biggest news is that work has begun on a new development base providing both 64bit and 32bit architectures which will be based on a rolling Debian Testing distribution base.

by Conor at January 30, 2015 07:54 PM

Qtractor 0.6.5 is out!

Rui Nuno Capela has just announced a new release of Qtractor, this time codenamed 'The Fermion Ray'.

Highlights of this release include -

  • MIDI clip record/overdubbing (NEW)
  • Extended track multi-selection for mute/solo (NEW)
  • VST-shell sub-plugins support (NEW)
  • JACK transport start/stop resilience (FIX)

Full details can be found at rncbc.org

by Conor at January 30, 2015 07:36 PM

MusE 2.2.1 released

The MusE developers have just released version 2.2.1.

Fixes and improvements include:

by Conor at January 30, 2015 07:31 PM

rncbc.org

Qtractor 0.6.5 - The Fermion Ray is out!

Spread the word,

Qtractor 0.6.5 (fermion ray beta) is out!

Release highlights:

  • MIDI clip record/overdubbing (NEW)
  • Extended track multi-selection for mute/solo (NEW)
  • VST-shell sub-plugins support (NEW)
  • JACK transport start/stop resilience (FIX)

And still,

Qtractor is an audio/MIDI multi-track sequencer application written in C++ with the Qt4 framework. Target platform is Linux, where the Jack Audio Connection Kit (JACK) for audio and the Advanced Linux Sound Architecture (ALSA) for MIDI are the main infrastructures to evolve as a fairly-featured Linux desktop audio workstation GUI, specially dedicated to the personal home-studio.

Flattr this

Website:

http://qtractor.sourceforge.net

Project page:

http://sourceforge.net/projects/qtractor

Downloads:

License:

Qtractor is free, open-source software, distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL) version 2 or later.

Change-log:

  • Connections lines now drawn with anti-aliasing; connections splitter handles width is now reduced; the MIDI connections splitter pane sizes are now saved and restored properly.
  • Extended multi-selection is now featured on the track-list (main left-pane), primarily allowing for group mute/solo (and monitor) switching.
  • Track-list (left pane) header column widths are now saved and made persistent across application power cycle (double-click reverts to the old original default).
  • Minor fixes on the MIDI clip event list editor, also making sure the current event is visible on the piano-roll view.
  • As long to prevent asynchronous mistakes to JACK transport state changes, an internal slack-delay is now introduced after self-initiated transport commands (eg. start/stop).
  • The MIDI clip editor (aka. piano-roll) was missing to clear or reset the current selection when no shift/ctrl keyboard modifier is in effect.
  • VST-shell sub-plugins are now supported (as suggested by abique aka. Alexandre Bique, thanks).
  • MIDI clip record/overdubbing is now possible (Clip/Record on the main menu or File/Record from the MIDI clip editor.
  • Make sure some audio sample file encodings (eg. old Ogg Vorbis) does not head-start on audio peak generation.

Enjoy && have fun.

by rncbc at January 30, 2015 07:30 PM

January 29, 2015

aubio

Aubio meets R

Martin started a new open source project called Vocobox - a voice controller for digital instruments. He started putting together a human voice dataset that provides multiple short samples of human sung notes in various way (different notes, voyels, etc).

R Logo

R, a free software environment for statistical computing and graphics

For this project, Martin created the R binding to aubio, that will allow you to gather data using aubio command line tools directly from within R.

January 29, 2015 04:51 PM

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] MusE 2.2.1 released

From: Robert Jonsson <spamatica@...>
Subject: [LAA] MusE 2.2.1 released
Date: Jan 29, 7:34 am 2015

MusE 2.2.1 - 2015-01-28

Hi All!

We've just released version 2.2.1 of MusE. To make way for bigger things we
decided to release a minor update with some additions and some bugs fixed.
Have fun!

Fixes and improvements include:
- Optimizations to lv2 rtfifo
- Fix for potential crash on startup due to defaultStyle
- Updated Czech translation from Pavel Fric
- Added explicit link library to simpledrums, didn't appear on some systems
- Added some new keyboard shortcuts, duplicate tracks, edit track name
- Make it possible to mute/solo lots/all of tracks at once

For more information and additional changes see the full changelog at:
https://github.com/muse-sequencer/muse/blob/muse_2_2_1/muse2/ChangeLog

News section:
http://muse-sequencer.org/index.php/News

Download:
http://muse-sequencer.org/index.php/Download

Demos page:
http://muse-sequencer.org/index.php/Demos

Forum:
http://muse-sequencer.org/forum/

Keep on Rocking!
The MusE Team
_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-announce mailing list
Linux-audio-announce@lists.linuxaudio.org
http://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-announce

read more

January 29, 2015 08:00 AM

[LAA] MMA 15.01 the "Foggy Day in Wynndel" edition

From: Bob van der Poel <bob@...>
Subject: [LAA] MMA 15.01 the "Foggy Day in Wynndel" edition
Date: Jan 29, 7:34 am 2015

A stable release, version 15.01, of MMA--Musical MIDI Accompaniment
is available for downloading. In addition to a number of bug fixes
and optimizations, MMA now features:

- Works with Python 2.7 or 3.x
- Number of minor bug fixes
- TRIGGER function
- STICKY tracks which override grooves
- ORNAMENT enhancements and fixes

Please read the file text/CHANGES-14 for a complete list of changes.

MMA is a accompaniment generator -- it creates midi tracks
for a soloist to perform with. User supplied files contain
pattern selections, chords, and MMA directives. For full details
please visit:

http://www.mellowood.ca/mma/

If you have any questions or comments, please send
them to: bob@mellowood.ca


--
**** Listen to my FREE CD at http://www.mellowood.ca/music/cedars ****
Bob van der Poel ** Wynndel, British Columbia, CANADA **
EMAIL: bob@mellowood.ca
WWW: http://www.mellowood.ca
_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-announce mailing list
Linux-audio-announce@lists.linuxaudio.org
http://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-announce

read more

January 29, 2015 08:00 AM

January 27, 2015

Scores of Beauty

Introducing ScholarLY

It has become a kind of a habit that more involved edition projects that I’m doing with (or as) beautifulScores not only produce beautiful printed results but also improve or extend LilyPond’s capabilities along the way. Take our award-winning edition of the songs of Oskar Fried for example. More or less direct by-products were Janek’s enhancements to shaping curves, Frescobaldi’s new Layout Control Mode and my lilyglyphs LaTeX package. Publicly shared insights about the usefulness of version control for musical work may be considered a surplus in this respect …

Now it seems our crowd engraving project on “Das trunkne Lied” by the very same composer yields even more important results. With ScholarLY I just created a spin-off from our orchestral score’s project directory that may soon become a serious editorial toolkit and make LilyPond an even more indispensable tool for scholarly work.

Entering Annotations

In a recent post I described how I implemented a preliminary interface for annotating musical scores in the LilyPond input files. This relates to an even earlier post where I expressed the desire to edit critical remarks in-place. As a reminder, this is the interface I added to enter annotations in LilyPond’s input files:

  \musicalIssue \with {
    message = "Hairpin missing in OE, taken from bassoons"
  }
  Hairpin
  f2. \> ) |

This annotates the hairpin following the f2. with a “musical issue”, creates a clickable message in the console output and colors the hairpin green. The coloring immediately draws the attention of a reader to the spots that may still need consideration and is therefore a very useful tool already. But there was one fundamental drawback until now: annotations had no notion of their place in the timeline of the score. Having received a jump start through a ready-to-use basic engraver provided by David Nalesnik (thank you!) I managed to overcome this limitation and now annotations know “where” in a score they have been inserted!

There are five annotation commands available, \criticalRemark, \musicalIssue, \lilypondIssue, \question and \todo, plus the generic \annotation that can be turned into a custom annotation type. In fact these annotations can already act as a quite versatile in-score issue tracker – which is a very good thing because in my experience using regular issue trackers such as on GitHub or even the more fluid approach of a “card” type application like Trello are too clumsy to be used efficiently in the context of an edition project. They tend to be used rather sparingly and thus inappropriately. Having the possibility to insert issues directly in the source is a practical approach that can be used with little overhead, and I think it can encourage maintainable workflows complementing version control.

Exporting Annotations

As another major improvement annotations can now be exported to a file instead of only being printed to the console. The implementation is still somewhat rough but it can already be used professionally for our edition project (or adapted to arbitrary projects). So far annotations can be exported to plain text and LaTeX files, but I intend to add support for more file types, e.g. JSON, Markdown or HTML. Eventually this should be template based so it can easily be configured for specific projects.

When I wrote about Using LaTeX for a Musical Edition last year I was quite happy about the usefulness of entering critical remarks as LaTeX commands. These allow for structured input, flexible (re-)formatting and of course beautiful output. And now one of the dreams of that post has come true: the LaTeX input for these critical remarks can now be maintained directly in the LilyPond score! For example, the annotation shown above is rendered to the following LaTeX code:

\musicalIssue
   [author={Urs Liska}]
    {2}{1}
    {Contrabassoon}
    {Hairpin}
    {Hairpin missing in OE, taken from bassoons}

Using LaTeX this now can be typeset beautifully, and – as mentioned in the former post – it can produce different output for proofreading or final publication, simply through setting one switch. This is not fully implemented yet but I’ll soon have a proper initial LaTeX package ready to produce critical reports from LilyPond-generated annotation data! See the same annotation rendered in a structured “draft” layout by LaTeX:

An annotation in draft layout (click to view PDF)

An annotation in draft layout (click to view PDF)

A nice thing about producing such reports with LaTeX is the versatile way such “data” can be processed and rendered. See a sequence of annotations rendered in a compact publication layout:

Some critical remarks in publication layout (click to view PDF)

Some critical remarks in publication layout

Well, this is still rather sketchy but one can already see a few things here:

  • The last annotation is in the same bar as the previous, therefore we don’t repeat the barnumber and print a dash instead
  • The annotation type is only printed when it is not a critical remark
    (actually this doesn’t make much sense because in reality only critical remarks should remain in the report, but I wanted to show the technique)
  • the pp is beautifully printed using a notation font using the lilyglyphs LaTeX package. Not only this but arbitrary LaTeX code can be entered in annotation messages.

Using it in Scholarly Editing

So, why is this cool? Well, the main point of all this is that music and annotations can be edited in one single place – the LilyPond input file. This relieves the author from establishing (and keeping alive) the link between the score and a separate text document mentally. While this may look like just a nice feature I’m convinced this is an actual quantum leap in usability with regard to scholarly editing of scores.

Have a look at the following screenshot from a Frescobaldi session. The Music View on the right hand of the screen shows two differently colored items (green arrow) that immediately tell the reader browsing the score that there is something to consider. Clicking on an item will let the source editor on the left hand side open the input file at the correct location (red arrows) where the annotations can be edited or even removed. At the same time the LilyPond Log on the lower left side has produced a chronological list from all annotations. When looking through all of the annotations this is an even more efficient and reliable approach than looking for colored items in the score. Of course these entries are also clickable and jump to the correct input location at will.

Frescobaldi with annotations in music view, source editor and log viewer (click to enlarge)

Frescobaldi with annotations in music view, source editor and log viewer (click to enlarge)

Now let’s consider the process of proof-reading a scholarly edition. For this I carefully compare the original source(s) with the new engraving until I spot any difference. Now I have to look up if that difference is documented in the critical report, so I note the measure number and locate the corresponding position in the report. With the new annotations it isn’t necessary anymore to switch contexts and work my way through the text document. Instead I can simply navigate within one editing environment, as one can see from the above example. So if I notice a difference between the source edition and the new edition I can easily deal with it without all that tedious, confusing and error-prone context switching I had to deal with until now!

Just as a side note: It may sound trivial but for real-world projects it is also a great improvement that timing information about annotations doesn’t have to be maintained manually in the report document. This is also generated automatically by LilyPond, so I can’t make any errors and don’t have to worry about formatting consistency.

But the improvements already start with the original music entry, and the different annotation types ease the workflow even more. With LilyPond’s new features I can immediately make notes about my observations: when I enter a Slur I can add the “musical issue” annotation right beside it in the input file. And later, when I’m doing a proper critical revision I can change that to a “critical remark” once I’ve decided about the case. This ease of entry and navigation is actually encouraging people to make use of annotations, and you can take our crowd engraving project as an example where we already produced 1,201 annotations by now, just having entered and peer reviewed the instrumental parts of the score, without having even started a proper revision. Maintaining annotations in the input files (with colored output and console messages) also makes it significantly less probable that annotations slip through our attention. When comparing a score with a separate document it is my own responsibility to process each single entry while unprocessed new-style annotations will “pop up” on their own.

Starting With a New Project: ScholarLY

Originally I developed \annotate and its infrastructure in the context of our current edition project, and it has turned out to be a wise decision to use it even when it was only an interface that didn’t do anything yet. If I had waited until the function is ready we wouldn’t have been able to actually use it in the project. And as it stands now the presence of 1,201 annotations has been a very effective motivation to seriously dig into the issue again because otherwise most of that work might have been wasted.

Now that the annotation functionality is in a usable state I created a new project and moved the code into it: ScholarLY. This is a launch I had in mind for quite some time as I hope this will become a serious and powerful toolkit for scholarly editions, and I’m happy that I finally got there. A consistent and comprehensive library with reliable and versatile edition tools will make the natural advantages of LilyPond’s text based approach even more obvious, and I hope it will attract new academic users, institutions and/or publishers to use LilyPond and friends. If you are interested in the project you may have a look at the Wiki which describes what can already be achieved, at the Roadmap document where I collect my ideas and wishes. Or you can of course inspect the actual code. If you obtain the library (by download or git clone?) you can play around with the example document in the examples folder too.

With \annotate I did not create more than the foundation for this project, and the whole “house” will have to be built on top of that. Therefore I encourage everybody who is interested in scholarly editing to join me in that undertaking. Of course I’d be happy about collaborators with skills in LilyPond, Scheme, LaTeX and Python but there is also significant need for discussion about overall strategy and user interface, so don’t hesitate to get in touch even when you don’t think you’ll be able to contribute code. I propose any communication to be done on the lilypond-user mailing list, so if you don’t think you should contact me privately please post something there.

Apart from \annotate there are two more building blocks that will form the foundation of ScholarLY: a well-defined toolbox with smaller helper functions that make scholarly editing simpler with LilyPond, and LaTeX package to typeset reports from the LilyPond-generated annotations. \annotate will be able to use these tools, e.g. for highlighting editorial amendments, adding footnotes or ossias, and there will be other useful tools that scholarly editions may need to prepare their scores and reports.

I’m sure \annotate will once more have a significant influence on the way I conceive scholarly workflows, and I hope this can become a widely used toolkit for others as well. I think this really is something important, not only for its actual value but for its potentials. Maybe the most fundamental aspect to it is not what ScholarLY is able to do but that it shows what can be done with LilyPond in general. Given a vision and people with the right skills it is possible to create tools and workflows for about anything – which is inherent to LilyPond’s text based design.

by Urs Liska at January 27, 2015 10:13 PM

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] [ANN] Radium 3.0.rc3

From: Kjetil Matheussen <k.s.matheussen@...>
Subject: [LAA] [ANN] Radium 3.0.rc3
Date: Jan 27, 8:58 pm 2015

--001a1134cf8e6faf71050d81a534
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8

Radium is a new type of music editor. It is inspired by trackers,
but has fewer limitations and uses graphics to show musical data.

Homepage: http://users.notam02.no/~kjetism/radium/
Screenshots and videos:
http://users.notam02.no/~kjetism/radium/screenshots.php

Source code and 64 bit binary packages are available.


Most important changes in 3.0.rc2 -> 3.0.rc3
=================================
* Fix pd plugin on fedora 21 (and other distributions having wish8.6)
* Fix various crashes related to changing the number of visible lines while
playing
* Use Unicode everywhere. Don't crash if running Radium in a non-ascii path.
* Fix "use last estimated vblank value" button
* Fix clang 3.5 compilation
* Give specific warning if using the Nouveau driver
* Fix memory leaks when loading samples

--001a1134cf8e6faf71050d81a534
Content-Type: text/html; charset=UTF-8
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable


Radium is a new type of music editor. =
It is inspired by trackers,
but has fewer limitations and uses gr=
aphics to show musical data.


Source code and 64 bit bin=
ary packages are available.


Most im=
portant changes in 3.0.rc2 -> 3.0.rc3
=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=
=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=
* Fix pd plugin on fedora 21 (and other distributions havin=
g wish8.6)
* Fix various crashes related to changing the numb=
er of visible lines while playing
* Use Unicode everywhere. Don&#=
39;t crash if running Radium in a non-ascii path.
* Fix "use=
last estimated vblank value" button
* Fix clang 3.5 compila=
tion
* Give specific warning if using the Nouveau driver

v>* Fix memory leaks when loading samples



--001a1134cf8e6faf71050d81a534--

read more

January 27, 2015 09:00 PM

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

Creating a simple synthesizer in Pure Data – Part I

What is the objective of this tutorial?

In this tutorial we're going to make a very simple synthesizer using Pure Data and learn its concepts and workflow along the way. The objective is to get you started with the software in a kind of hands-on approach, doing something relatively useful, relatively quick. If you want in-depth stuff, there are some great sites on the internet. See pd-tutorial.com and the Pure Data FLOSS manual.

by Conor at January 27, 2015 11:17 AM

January 25, 2015

Arch Linux Pro Audio

Interview with CrocoDuck

In the last month here at ArchAudio we learned of CrocoDuck, making music ranging from Neo-Soul to Electronic and Acoustic music. Who is this mysterious duck? We find out in this interview, but first checkout his laid-back funky track Ducky Jam:

Hi CrocoDuck! Who are you, and what are your interests?

I am a physicist crazy in love with science (that I still like to call natural philosophy like 200 years ago), waves, waves propagation, music and Linux. I am attending a master in acoustics right now that cover a broad range of these topics.

Why did you choose Arch as your distro?

Well, It has been a long quest for me. I started with Gentoo linux when I was a teenager with the help of my brother, a software engineer, and I think it is a great distro. But it requires way too much manual work to my taste. I moved to ubuntu – ubuntu studio during the 8 years of high-school and bachelor degree. It is all good but I found myself reinstalling the system every year to keep updated, but also because, after my crazy experiments, my system was kinda unstable. Then I found Arch (ArchBang to be honest) and I think it is a perfect balance. It requires you to go deep in the configuration, which is cool because you take control over your system, and it is very simple to keep your system as clean as possible thanks to the amazing tools you have, pacman first of all.

So the rolling release is a key point for you?

Yep, as it is a rolling distro and you never need to reinstall! I have been running my Arch box continuously for 3 years now and I feel like my computer is responsive and stable as the very first day I installed the system. You have some regression here and there sometimes, but the documentation is so well written and the community so helpful that the solution for any problem one could have it is usually found after some search. I would suggest Arch to anybody who:

  • Wants control over the system
  • Wants the latest software
  • Wants to maintain a system as clean as possible
  • Wants a rolling release
  • Wants to access a huge crazy amount of readily installable software (through repos or AUR)
  • It is willing to take care of the system and keep track of the changes he/she does (that implies that the system will stay stable)

So what tools do you use to make CrocoDuck’s music?

I am an old school guy. I use mostly just Ardour and Guitarix, which I think is getting insanely better at each release cycle. In my opinion, it is way better than any commercial piece of amp modelling software I ever tried. I also like Yoshimi, it is extremely powerful, and Calf plugins are my favourite ones. I also use sometimes some experimental software like fastbreeder and freqtweak. All my drum loops are made with Hydrogen, which is amazingly simple and intuitive to use and Jamin is a must for mastering.

That’s a list of only open source projects. Is that important to you?

The main reason why I use Linux and open source software: the Freedom! Nowadays the market is evolving giving to the consumer readily usable products over which the user have almost no control. Most of the commercial software it is engineered for marketing goals first, for doing its job second. Commercial OSes are more and more intended to mine data out of you than to work good. As a scientist I cannot stand the use of commercial software: it is a black box. You don’t have the source code, then you don’t know how your data are being processed. Science has not been invented to trust companies. I have to use MatLab at uni but I seriously cannot understand why not octave, elmer, scilab, R or root just to name a few. Only open source software gives to you the tools to build a system for yourself, not for other people to make money out of you. For me, Linux (but also any other open source system) is the only thing that turn a product you buy into something that it is really yours and free to be used as you want.

Don’t get me wrong, I don’t think that all the commercial software is bad. Some nice examples are Pianoteq and Renoise, very good pieces of software. Try the demos!

Thanks go to CrocoDuck for taking the time to talk to us here at ArchAudio.org, checkout the CrocoDuck soundcloud page for more music!

by harryhaaren at January 25, 2015 02:49 PM

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

Arturia unveils AudioFuse audio interface, with Linux support

Arturia recently attended the NAMM Show and unveiled AudioFuse, their new audio interface. AudioFuse is a compact USB interface with a plethora of I/O, including two built in mic preamps and ADAT I/O. The unit also has wide compatability, including Linux, and boasts a round-trip latency as low as 3 milliseconds.

by Conor at January 25, 2015 12:12 PM

January 23, 2015

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] Vee One Suite 0.6.0 - A third official beta release!

From: Rui Nuno Capela <rncbc@...>
Subject: [LAA] Vee One Suite 0.6.0 - A third official beta release!
Date: Jan 23, 8:45 pm 2015

Howdy,

Once again, the 'Vee One Suite' of 'old-school' software instruments,
featuring a 'gang of three' made of synthv1 [1] as a polyphonic
synthesizer, samplv1 [2] a polyphonic sampler and drumkv1 [3] as a
drum-kit sampler, are being released into the wild as in so called
'beta' phase.

Changes for this one third beta release are as follows:

- MIDI bank-select/program-changes is now supported, for patch, preset
and/or instrument program control.
- New Help/Configure dialog is introduced for editing the also new MIDI
bank/programs interface and user preference options as well (new home of
the old Help/Use native dialogs option).
- Presets may now be specified by base name, as an alternative to the
complete preset file-path on command line argument (re. stand-alone JACK
client).
- Fixed parameters A/B comparison swap.

As usual, all made available in dual form:

- a pure stand-alone JACK [4] client with JACK-session, NSM [5] (Non
Session management) and both JACK MIDI and ALSA [6] MIDI input support;
- a LV2 [7] instrument plug-in.

The Vee One Suite are free and open-source Linux Audio software,
distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL) [8]
version 2 or later.

Details are dumped below, business as usual ;)


* synthv1 - an old-school polyphonic synthesizer [1] *

synthv1 0.6.0 (third official beta) has been released!

synthv1 is an old-school all-digital 4-oscillator subtractive
polyphonic synthesizer with stereo fx.

LV2 URI: http://synthv1.sourceforge.net/lv2

website:
http://synthv1.sourceforge.net
downloads:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/synthv1/files
- source tarball:
http://download.sourceforge.net/synthv1/synthv1-0.6.0.tar.gz
- source package:

http://download.sourceforge.net/synthv1/synthv1-0.6.0-19.rncbc.suse132.src.rpm
- binary packages:

http://download.sourceforge.net/synthv1/synthv1-0.6.0-19.rncbc.suse132.i586.rpm

http://download.sourceforge.net/synthv1/synthv1-0.6.0-19.rncbc.suse132.x86_84.rpm


* samplv1 - an old-school polyphonic sampler [2] *

samplv1 0.6.0 (third official beta) has been released!

samplv1 is an old-school polyphonic sampler synthesizer with stereo fx.

LV2 URI: http://samplv1.sourceforge.net/lv2

website:
http://samplv1.sourceforge.net
downloads:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/samplv1/files
- source tarball:
http://download.sourceforge.net/samplv1/samplv1-0.6.0.tar.gz
- source package:

http://download.sourceforge.net/samplv1/samplv1-0.6.0-19.rncbc.suse132.src.rpm
- binary packages:

http://download.sourceforge.net/samplv1/samplv1-0.6.0-19.rncbc.suse132.i586.rpm

http://download.sourceforge.net/samplv1/samplv1-0.6.0-19.rncbc.suse132.x86_84.rpm


* drumkv1 - an old-school drum-kit sampler [3] *

drumkv1 0.6.0 (third official beta) has been released!

drumkv1 is an old-school drum-kit sampler synthesizer with stereo fx.

LV2 URI: http://drumkv1.sourceforge.net/lv2

website:
http://drumkv1.sourceforge.net
downloads:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/drumkv1/files
- source tarball:
http://download.sourceforge.net/drumkv1/drumkv1-0.6.0.tar.gz
- source package:

http://download.sourceforge.net/drumkv1/drumkv1-0.6.0-15.rncbc.suse132.src.rpm
- binary packages:

http://download.sourceforge.net/drumkv1/drumkv1-0.6.0-15.rncbc.suse132.i586.rpm

http://download.sourceforge.net/drumkv1/drumkv1-0.6.0-15.rncbc.suse132.x86_84.rpm

message continues]

read more

January 23, 2015 09:00 PM

[LAA] ICAD 2015 - call for submission

From: Visda Goudarzi <visda@...>
Subject: [LAA] ICAD 2015 - call for submission
Date: Jan 23, 8:45 pm 2015


Dear all,

(With apologies for cross posting, please distribute!)

This is a reminder that the call for participation for ICAD15 is currently open. http://icad15.iem.at

Call for Papers, Posters, Extended Abstracts, Music, Installations, and Workshops - ICAD 2015
“ICAD in Space: Interactive Spatial Sonification”

The 21st International Conference on Auditory Display
July 6 - 7 Workshops and Student Think Tank
July 8 - 10 Conference
University of Music and Performing Arts and Technical University of Graz, Austria.

The conference is organised by the Institute of Electronic Music and Acoustics (IEM). IEM is one of the
leading institutions in the field of audio engineering and computer music. As part of the University of
Music and Performing Arts Graz, IEM is a multidisciplinary institution, whose general mission is to bridge
the gap between science and the arts. As a unique characteristic, IEM focuses on sonification as part of
its research in computer music. IEM facilities include laboratories and performance spaces such as CUBE,
which are equipped with spatial audio and motion tracking systems. Since 2014, IEM hosts the Sonic
Interaction Design (SID) lab, in which interactive sound systems are designed and evaluated.

ICAD is a highly interdisciplinary conference with relevance to researchers, practitioners, artists, and
graduate students working with sound to convey and explore information. The conference is unique in
its specific focus on auditory displays and the range of interdisciplinary issues related to their use. Like
its predecessors, ICAD15 will be a single-track conference, open to all, with no membership or affiliation
requirements. In addition to ICAD's core interests, we would like to take the opportunity of the
conference being held at IEM to highlight this yearʼs theme ICAD in Space: Sonification, Sonic Interaction
Design, and Spatial Audio.


::::::::::::::::: KEY DATES :::::::::::::::::

15 February 2015 Submission of Papers, Posters, Music, and Installations
15 March 2015 Submission of Workshops
15 April 2015 Submission of Extended Abstracts
15 April 2015 Notification of acceptance for Workshops
01 May 2015 Notification of acceptance for Papers, Posters, Music, and Installations
15 May 2015 Notification of acceptance for Extended Abstracts
01 June 2015 Camera-Ready deadline

::::::::::::::::: AREAS OF INTEREST :::::::::::::::::

Relevant areas for ICAD include but are not limited to:

Auditory Display:
- Aesthetics, Culture, & Philosophy
- Design, Theory & Methods
- Technology: Tools & Applications
- Perceptual and Cognitive Aspects
- Usability & Evaluation
- Accessibility

Special Focus of ICAD15:
- Sonification:
- Exploration of Data through Sound
- Sonification as Art
- Sonic Interaction Design
- Interaction design
- Input technologies
- Auditory Information Design
- Spatial Audio
- Binaural virtual acoustics
- Loudspeaker-based sound field synthesis

Accepted papers will be included in the published proceedings and made publicly available in the
Georgia Tech SMARTech system (http:// smartech.gatech.edu/). The types of submissions solicited for
ICAD15 include:

::::::::::::::::: PAPERS AND POSTERS:::::::::::::::::

Paper and poster submissions will be 4-8 pages in length, including all figures and references. Typical
paper contributions are between 6 - 8 pages, and typical poster contributions are 4 - 5 pages long. Full
papers should describe work that offers a substantial contribution to the field of auditory display.
Authors of accepted papers will be invited to give an oral prese [message continues]

read more

January 23, 2015 09:00 PM

rncbc.org

Vee One Suite 0.6.0 - A third beta release

Howdy,

Once again, the Vee One Suite of old-school software instruments, featuring a gang of three made of synthv1, as a polyphonic synthesizer, samplv1, a polyphonic sampler and drumkv1, as a drum-kit sampler, are being released into the wild as in so called beta phase.

Changes for this one third beta release are as follows:

  • MIDI bank-select/program-changes is now supported, for patch, preset and/or instrument program control.
  • New Help/Configure dialog is introduced for editing the also new MIDI bank/programs interface and user preference options as well (new home of the old Help/Use native dialogs option).
  • Presets may now be specified by base name, as an alternative to the complete preset file-path on command line argument (re. stand-alone JACK client).
  • Fixed parameters A/B comparison swap.

As usual, all made available in dual form:

  • a pure stand-alone JACK client with JACK-session, NSM (Non Session management) and both JACK MIDI and ALSA MIDI input support;
  • a LV2 instrument plug-in.

The Vee One Suite are free and open-source Linux Audio software, distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL) version 2 or later.

Details are dumped below, business as usual ;)

synthv1 - an old-school polyphonic synthesizer

synthv1 0.6.0 (third official beta) has been released!

synthv1 is an old-school all-digital 4-oscillator subtractive polyphonic synthesizer with stereo fx.

LV2 URI: http://synthv1.sourceforge.net/lv2
website:
http://synthv1.sourceforge.net
downloads:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/synthv1/files

Flattr this

samplv1 - an old-school polyphonic sampler

samplv1 0.6.0 (third official beta) has been released!

samplv1 is an old-school polyphonic sampler synthesizer with stereo fx.

LV2 URI: http://samplv1.sourceforge.net/lv2
website:
http://samplv1.sourceforge.net
downloads:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/samplv1/files

Flattr this

drumkv1 - an old-school drum-kit sampler

drumkv1 0.6.0 (third official beta) has been released!

drumkv1 is an old-school drum-kit sampler synthesizer with stereo fx.

LV2 URI: http://drumkv1.sourceforge.net/lv2
website:
http://drumkv1.sourceforge.net
downloads:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/drumkv1/files

Flattr this

Enjoy && have fun.

by rncbc at January 23, 2015 06:30 PM

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

Guitarix needs your presets!

The Guitarix team are looking to replace the current set of presets in Guitarix with something more up to date. For this, they are looking for users to send them their best presets. They will then choose the best ones out of these submissions to create a new factory preset bank.

by Conor at January 23, 2015 06:13 PM

Vee One Suite sees its third beta release

Rui Nuno Capela has released the third beta, version 0.6.0, of his Vee One Suite. This suite contains 3 plugins -

  • Synthv1 - an old-school polyphonic synthesizer
  • Samplv1 - an old-school polyphonic sampler
  • Drumkv1 - an old-school drum-kit sampler

Changes in this release include -

by Conor at January 23, 2015 06:09 PM

Hackaday » digital audio hacks

DIY USB Stereo Headphone Amplifier

The biggest and best audiophile projects are usually huge tube amps, monstrous speaker cab builds, or something else equally impressive. It doesn’t always have to be that way, though, as [lowderd] demonstrates with a tiny DIY USB DAC build that turns a USB port into a headphone output.

In the Bad Old Days™ putting a DAC on a USB bus would require some rather fancy hardware and a good amount of skill. These days, you can just buy a single chip USB stereo DAC that still has very good specs. [lowderd] used the TI PCM2707 USB DAC, a chip that identifies as a USB Audio Class 1.0 device, so no drivers are needed for it to work in either Windows or OS X.

The circuit fits on a tiny PCB with a USB port on one side, a headphone jack on the other, and the chip and all related components in between. There are some pins on the chip that allow for volume, play/pause. and skip, but these pins were left unconnected for sake of simplicity.

The board was fabbed up at OSH Park, and the second revision of the case laser cut out of bamboo and acrylic by Ponoko. It’s a great looking little box, and something that fits right inside [lowderd]’s headphone case.


Filed under: digital audio hacks

by Brian Benchoff at January 23, 2015 03:00 AM

January 21, 2015

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] [ANN] Radium 3.0.rc1

From: Kjetil Matheussen <k.s.matheussen@...>
Subject: [LAA] [ANN] Radium 3.0.rc1
Date: Jan 21, 9:30 am 2015

--001a11c3561e786877050cf355fe
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8

Radium is a new type of music editor. It is inspired by trackers,
but has fewer limitations and uses graphics to show musical data.

Homepage: http://users.notam02.no/~kjetism/radium/
Screenshots and videos:
http://users.notam02.no/~kjetism/radium/screenshots.php

This time there are also 64 bit binary packages available for download.

Most important changes in 3.0:
=======================
* OpenGL to show graphics.
* Smooth scrolling
* Lots of code rewritten.
* Enhanced graphics and user interface
* Lots of bugs removed and features added.

--001a11c3561e786877050cf355fe
Content-Type: text/html; charset=UTF-8
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Radium is a new type of music editor. It is inspired by tr=
ackers,
but has fewer limitations and uses graphics to show musical data=
.


This time there are also 64 bit binary p=
ackages available for download.

Most important=
changes in 3.0:
=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=
=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D
* OpenGL to show graphics.
* Smooth scrolling
* Lo=
ts of code rewritten.
* Enhanced graphics and user interface
* Lots o=
f bugs removed and features added.



--001a11c3561e786877050cf355fe--

read more

January 21, 2015 10:00 AM

Hackaday » digital audio hacks

Learning Python With Tron Radio

[5 Volt Junkie] has built his share of Arduino projects, but never anything with Python, and certainly never anything with a GUI. After listening to Internet radio one day, a new idea for a project was born: a Raspberry Pi with a small touchscreen display for a UI and displaying soma.fm tracks. It’s finally finished, and it’s a great introduction to Python, Pygame, and driving tiny little displays with the Pi.

Playing soma.fm streams was handled by mpd and mpc, while the task of driving a 2.8″ TFT LCD was handled by the fbtft Linux framebuffer driver. This left [5 Volt Junkie] with the task of creating a GUI, some buttons, and working out how to play a few streams. This meant drawing some buttons in Inkscape, but these were admittedly terrible, so [5 Volt Junkie] gave up and turned on the TV. Tron Legacy was playing, giving him the inspiration to complete his Tron-themed music player.

The result of [5 Volt Junkie]’s work is a few hundred lines of Python with Pygame and a few multicolor skins all wrapped up in a Tron theme. It looks great, it works great, and it’s a great introduction to Python and Pygame.


Filed under: digital audio hacks, Raspberry Pi

by Brian Benchoff at January 21, 2015 12:01 AM

January 18, 2015

OpenAV

Fabla2 : Progress continues…

Fabla2 : Progress continues…

Another few weeks fly by: but there’s also a few weeks of progress to be shown. From small features (panic button) to large features (removal of samples), and some middle size (shiny new dialog boxes!) development continutes at a good pace. With Fabla2 and AVTK development, and preparations for the LAC 2015 there’s a lot happening, and we hope to share… Read more →

by harry at January 18, 2015 10:28 PM

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

Newsletter for January out now - Interview, Drumgizmo Tutorial and Survey Results

Our newsletter for January is now sent to our subscribers. If you have not yet subscribed, you can do that from our start page.

You can also read the latest issue online. In it you will find:

  • First 'LMP Asks' interview of the year, with Spencer Jackson
  • Drumgizmo tutorial
  • LMP Survey results
  • New software release announcements

and more!

by admin at January 18, 2015 10:12 PM

January 17, 2015

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] OSC2MIDI utility, version 0.0.00_beta!

From: Spencer Jackson <ssjackson71@...>
Subject: [LAA] OSC2MIDI utility, version 0.0.00_beta!
Date: Jan 17, 9:10 am 2015

--047d7b62499831d5bf050cba0f32
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8

Hi all:

My project of the last few months is probably ready to set free on some
more machines.

OSC2MIDI is a flexible osc -> midi bridge written in C and designed
especially for control of jack midi apps from an android device. It was
created with the open source android app Control (OSC + MIDI) in mind,
since thats what I use, but was deliberately designed so that one can
specify any arbitrary mapping of messages for conversion with plain text
files. The default mapping works with well with Control but I also have
included maps for adrosc, touchosc, and generic osc messages. Mapping is
(in my opinion) extensively documented in the map file default.omm included
with the source so you can quickly create your own map to suit your own
needs.

Please give it a whirl if you are interested and leave feedback on the
sourceforge project page (discussion for questions, tickets for issues).
I'll let it sit at beta for a bit. Once I clear out any initial bugs (or
miraculously none are found) I'll take off the beta status.

Get it at:
https://sourceforge.net/projects/osc2midi/

Follow the README for installation help, or if stuck, please reach out to
me.

Enjoy!
_ssj71

note: as for the ambitious version number (0.0.00) I see no point in
version numbering before release of a one-man project. :) If it scares you
feel free to rename the folder with a larger number. Once a few bug reports
come in it will grow.

--047d7b62499831d5bf050cba0f32
Content-Type: text/html; charset=UTF-8
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Hi all:

My project of the=
last few months is probably ready to set free on some more machines.

r>
OSC2MIDI is a flexible osc <-> midi bridge written in C and d=
esigned especially for control of jack midi apps from an android device. It=
was created with the open source android app Control (OSC + MIDI) in mind,=
since thats what I use, but was deliberately designed so that one can spec=
ify any arbitrary mapping of messages for conversion with plain text files.=
The default mapping works with well with Control but I also have included =
maps for adrosc, touchosc, and generic osc messages. Mapping is (in my opin=
ion) extensively documented in the map file default.omm included with the s=
ource so you can quickly create your own map to suit your own needs.


>
Please give it a whirl if you are interested and leave feedback on t=
he sourceforge project page (discussion for questions, tickets for issues).=
I'll let it sit at beta for a bit. Once I clear out any initial bugs (=
or miraculously none are found) I'll take off the beta status.

=
/div>
Follow=
the README for installation help, or if stuck, please reach out to me.
=

Enjoy!
_ssj71


iv>note: as for the ambitious version number (0.0.00) I see no point in ver=
sion numbering before release of a one-man project. :) If it scares you fee=
l free to rename the folder with a larger number. Once a few bug reports co=
me in it will grow.


--047d7b62499831d5bf050cba0f32--

read more

January 17, 2015 10:00 AM

January 16, 2015

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

Calf Studio Gear demonstration videos

With the up and coming release of version 0.0.60 of the Calf plugin suite, Markus Schmidt has been posting some videos demonstrating some of the plugins. Check them out!

by Conor at January 16, 2015 11:15 PM

Nothing Special

JACK Midi Control from your Android Phone over WiFi

Since my fundraising for my plugin GUIs is more or less bust, I've been thinking more about making music. I can't really stop developing, cause I'm fairly addicted, but I'm trying to ween myself back to just making whatever I want, rather than trying to develop stuff that will change the world. The world doesn't care that much. Anyhow, this blog is no place for bitterness.

But I have been playing with synths a bit more lately and still am really missing my expression controls. Now I could try to use the old touchmidi app I developed, but it only works with my laptop, and I now have a dedicated desktop in the studio to host my synths so I don't have a touchpad to use. I do have several android devices though. They should be great input interfaces. They can display whatever they like on the screen and have a touch interface so you can have arbitrary configurations of buttons, sliders, knobs, whatever. So I decided to figure out how.



There are a few tools you need, but first: an overview. The key to sending control information from one device to another is OSC (Open Sound Control), which in a nutshell is a way to send data over a network, designed for media applications. We need something to interpret touch input on the phone or tablet and send an OSC message. Then something needs to receive the message, interpret it, convert it to a midi message and send it out a JACK midi port. Well, we aren't inventing the wheel, there are several programs that can do these or related tasks.

One closed source system is TouchOSC. They have a free desktop app and the android app is a few dollars. But its closed source and doesn't actually work on linux. UNACCEPTABLE.
There are really several other apps, many of them free and none of them have had updates in the last few years. Ardroid is an OSC controller, but it is meant for ardour, you can't make custom interfaces like you can with TouchOSC.

What we want is Control. It hasn't been updated for a few years and its kinda buggy, but its OPEN. I could go fix it from the github source (but it would take me a bit of research on android stuff and I'm not a java fan) but its good enough as it is to get by. It uses customizable interface layouts written in JSON and you can add scripting to the interface through javascripts, so no crazy new formats. The real bugs are just in the landscape and portrait mode switching, so I have to open and close the interface a couple times before it gets it right. It's also cross platform.

I was able to make an interface after a few infuriating late night hours of trying to edit one of the examples (that I'm pretty sure had a lot of iOS specific JSON tags), then trying again next morning using the blank template and getting it done in about an hour. I never learn. Its a little involved to make a custom interface but there are good examples and decent documentation. It seems after a while of development the author focused much more on iOS and neglected the Android side, so there are several tags like color that don't work on android and make the interface much buggier if you attempt to use them. If someone wants to be super rad they would take this app and fix it up, make it a bit more robust and report json errors found in layouts etc... But its good enough that I'll just keep using it as it is.

For starters, you can just use the interfaces the app comes with. Go ahead and install it from google play. They have a pretty good variety of interesting interfaces that aren't all exactly conducive to midi control (remember apps CAN have built in OSC support like ardour and non-mixer do) but any of the interfaces built into Control will work. I'll tell you a bit about some other interfaces later.

UPDATE: Since I started writing this, another open source android app has come up: andrOSC. Its much simpler but allows you to edit everything in the app. Its a great option for anyone who wants a custom interface without any sort of file editing or extra uploading. Its a little too simple for what I want so I'm going to stick with Control for now.


Now we just need someplace to send the OSC data that the Control interface will output. Well I thought mididings was the tool for this job but it only accepts a few arbitrary OSC commands and there is no way to change the filtering through OSC aside from making scenes and switching between them. So that was a dead end.

But, the libraries used by mididings are openly available, so I figured I'd just make a python script to do the same thing. Except I've only edited a few python scripts and this is a few steps beyond that. The libraries used are actually c libraries anyway, so c wins. Hold on a sec, I'll just whip up a C program.

(Months go by)

Ah that was quick, right? Wait, Christmas is in how many days?!
Oh well. It works. And its completely configurable (and more features on the way). This gives you the flexibility to change the mapping wherever its easiest, in your OSC client app (i.e. our Control interface), in the osc2midi converter map file, or in the midi of the target program. In another post I'll describe how to use osc2midi more fully (with custom mappings) for now the default one works (because I wrote it to work with all the example interfaces that come with Control).

Download a snapshot, (EDIT: I just released the first beta, from now on, download the files) extract them, and install them:
cd osc2midi
cd build
cmake ..
make
sudo make install

Then run:
osc2midi


Not too bad (if it didn't work cmake should help you, or just check the README for the dependencies). This gives you a jack midi client and opens an OSC host at 192.168.X.X:57120 (Your computer's IP address : Default port). If you don't know your ip address you can get it with the terminal command ipconfig. Connect the jack midi out port to Carla or whatever you like (I'll proceed with assuming you are using Carla).

Now we need to connect the Control app to the OSC server. Click the destinations tab and the plus sign at the top to enter in the address of the OSC host. From there go back to the interfaces tab and select whatever interface sounds like it will tickle your fancy. For this exercise we'll go ahead and use the mixer interface. If it looks squashed or doesn't fit on the screen you probably have to go back to the menu and open the interface one more time. I always have to open it twice like that (obnoxious, right? you should really go fix that!).

In Carla, load a plugin. Simple amplifier is perfect. First connect the osc2midi output port to the simple amplifier events input port. Open the editing dialog for the plugin and click the parameters tab at the bottom. Simple amplifier only has a single parameter (gain) and so you'll see a single horizontal slider and 2 spinboxes right of it. These numbers select the midi control number (CC) and channel.

Since we called osc2midi without arguments it defaults to channel 1 (or 0 if you prefer 0 indexing) and the first slider in the mixer interface on your android device will send midi CC 1 so select "cc #1" in the middle numeric box. You just bound that midi control to change the amplifier gain. If your jack ports are all set up correctly you should be able to change the first slider on your phone/tablet and watch the slider in Carla wiggle up and down with it. You have CONTROL!!!

The setup
 The other sliders are just sequentially mapped through CC 12. You can figure out what anything is mapped to by either using kmidimon to look at the midi output or running osc2midi in verbose mode (osc2midi -v). You can add other plugins and control them by the same method. Get creative with it.

For my next trick, we'll make some sounds with Control. Hit the menu button on Control and select the Conway's Game of Life interface. The default mapping works but I include a better one with the installation. So in the terminal hit Ctl+C to stop osc2midi. We'll start it again specifying a different map file. Type in:
osc2midi -m gameOfLife.omm
And the server will be restarted on the same port so you won't need to change anything else.

Now lets load an instrument plugin into Carla. I like amsynth but you can use any you like (though a polyphonic one will probably be more fun for this exercise). With an instrument plugin loaded just connect the midi-in port of the instrument to the osc2midi output the the audio output from your plugin/carla to your soundcard. Click several of the buttons on the grid in Control and you should hear some notes start playing. They will stay on till you click it again. Or click the start button and the notes start toggling themselves and you have a nice random sequencer.

This isn't quite enough for simulating all the expression you can get out of a good synthesizer or midi controller, but its a start. The best part is these open tools are all highly configurable, so we have a working system with just using all the defaults. But we can also setup very powerful and custom configurations by tweaking the interface in Control, the mapping in osc2midi, and often the midi bindings in your destination program (like Carla). But we'll save the rest for another post. In the mean time, try all the templates and get creative with these tools.

by Spencer (noreply@blogger.com) at January 16, 2015 01:06 PM

January 15, 2015

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

AVL Drumkits - Multiple format drum samples from Glen MacArthur

Glen MacArthur, the maintainer of AV Linux, has done some more work and improvements on his existing drumkit libraries and added a completely new one called 'The Red Zeppelin'.

He has also set up a webpage with details and images of the sampled drumkits. Here you will find links to SFZ and SF2 sample libraries. Hydrogen kits are due to be uploaded soon.

by Conor at January 15, 2015 09:39 PM

Axoloti, open hardware unit, reaches crowdfunding goal

Axoloti is an interesting open hardware unit that allows "effects processing, step-sequencing, sample playback, or granular processing". It started its crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo at the end of December. It has already reached it's goal, with 2 weeks left of the campaign.

by Conor at January 15, 2015 03:07 PM

Setting up and using Drumgizmo in Ardour

What is Drumgizmo?

Drumgizmo is a drum sampler plugin available in the LV2 plugin format. It is also available as a standalone version. There are already drum samplers available for Linux, so what's so different about Drumgizmo?

Drumgizmo's main aim is to simulate a real drum kit. It supports the following features -

by Conor at January 15, 2015 11:24 AM

January 13, 2015

linux.autostatic.com » linux.autostatic.com

Packaging Python Stuff

While packaging Tuna I ran into an issue for which I couldn't easily find a workaround on the ubiquitous search engine. Tuna depends on some unavailable Python applications so those had to be packaged too. After having successfully tested the packages locally with pbuilder I uploaded them to Launchpad and noticed that they failed to build. Apparently the Python installer setup.py wants to install in /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages and while that worked fine locally with pbuilder, Launchpad had an issue with that:

Found files in /usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages (must be in dist-packages for python2.7).
debian/python-schedutils/usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages
debian/python-schedutils/usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/schedutils.so
debian/python-schedutils/usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/schedutils-0.4-py2.7.egg-info
dh_builddeb.pkgbinarymangler: dpkg-deb --build debian/python-schedutils .. returned exit code 1
make: *** [binary-arch] Error 1
dpkg-buildpackage: error: /usr/bin/fakeroot debian/rules binary-arch gave error exit status 2

Apparently the files had to be installed in /usr/lib/python2.7/dist-packages but how to instruct the installer to do so without having to resort to ugly hacks? As I couldn't find any useful answers on the web I asked falkTX on #kxstudio. He said the setup.py installer has a flag to install to dist-packages instead of site-packages, --install-layout deb. So I added that to the debian/rules file and gave it another spin:

#!/usr/bin/make -f
# -*- makefile -*-
# Sample debian/rules that uses debhelper.
# This file was originally written by Joey Hess and Craig Small.
# As a special exception, when this file is copied by dh-make into a
# dh-make output file, you may use that output file without restriction.
# This special exception was added by Craig Small in version 0.37 of dh-make.

# Uncomment this to turn on verbose mode.
#export DH_VERBOSE=1

%:
dh $@

override_dh_auto_build:
python setup.py build

override_dh_auto_install:
python setup.py install --skip-build --prefix /usr --root $(CURDIR) --install-layout deb

Now both pbuilder and Launchpad built the package without any issues.

by Jeremy at January 13, 2015 02:06 PM

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

End of year survey results - 2014

*/

Thanks to everyone that filled out our end of year survey for 2014. As it was an open survey, there were a lot of different replies, but all the same, there are clear favourites in each category.

Here are the results -

 

by Conor at January 13, 2015 11:03 AM

January 12, 2015

Create Digital Music » open-source

Free AudioKit Lets iOS, Mac Developers Code Synths and Sound

AudioKit

AudioKit is a promising-looking new open source tool set for coding synthesizers, music, and sound on Apple platforms (though it could certainly be ported to other places if you have the time).

The draw: you get not only a robust library but loads of examples and tests, too, for a variety of applications, in both Objective-C and Apple’s new Swift language. And it’s free. The contributors will look familiar – and the core engine comes from community contributions around that most enduring of synthesis tools, Csound. (For those worried about obsolescence and the pace of technology, Csound has its roots in tools developed one half century ago, so in computer terms more or less the dawn of time.) In fact, what AudioKit is in effect is Csound as an audio engine, with Objective-C and Swift as the API – no orchestra/score files required. (And if you don’t know what I just said about “scores” and “orchestras” but do know Objective-C and Swift, well, this is definitely for you.)

There are examples for control and playback, convolution, FM and granular synthesis, and sequencing, among others. Below, they’ve produced a video that shows how a game can be enhanced with generated sound using the library. Features:

  • 100+ synths and effects, including physical models, spectral effects, granular synthesis, reverbs, etc.
  • Built-in sampling, complete with recording and storage functionality.
  • Sequencing you can trigger from code.
  • Examples with granular synthesis, convolution, effects processing, pitch-shifting, and more.
  • Human-readable code. (Yay, humans!) They write: “Conductors control Orchestras, which contain Instruments that produce Notes. Clear methods with Apple-style naming conventions, Xcode completion, documentation and tool-tips.”
  • Sound code you can integrate with your app logic.

AudioKit for Game Audio: Space Cannon from AudioKit on Vimeo.

Now, in some ways this is a mirror image of what we did with libpd. The notion of libpd was to separate sound and synthesis from the code that runs the app. The very same interactions are possible; the workflow emphasis is just different. (The basic principle of embedding a free tool as a library is otherwise the same, and this now means developers can use both Pure Data and Csound on the latest mobile platforms.)

Of course, a lot of us will choose both. For those comfortable with patching, or developers working with composers and sound designers who prefer to patch rather than code, using the two libraries together may make the most sense. For those comfortable with coding who want to sketch app logic and sound in the same environment, working with code directly here will be more appealing. (See also tools like Python’s lovely pyo.)

Add this to libpd, plus the weekend’s announcement of a new sync library, and it’s clear that free software and open source tools can coexist with Apple’s proprietary platform. At the risk of offending more rigid free software zealots, I think that’s only a good thing. It promotes coding literacy and self-sufficiency, and it demonstrates the flexibility, durability, and power of free software licenses to help people work together to solve problems. That can only encourage people to toy with free platforms, whether it’s connecting an Arduino or Raspberry Pi or dual-booting that Apple laptop to Linux. And having more shared code can also benefit platforms outside the walled garden.

Oh, plus it’s kind of fun making apps that make noises. Actually, I think that’s probably the most important bit. Check it out:

http://audiokit.io/features/

http://audiokit.io/blog/

Max Mathews, we miss you; it seems you will also live forever.

The post Free AudioKit Lets iOS, Mac Developers Code Synths and Sound appeared first on Create Digital Music.

by Peter Kirn at January 12, 2015 10:28 AM

LinuxMuso

Line 6 products (toneport, Pod, etc..) on Linux

Tonight after laying on the couch watching the NFL division playoffs unfold all day I decided to get active :D some research on how to interface to my line 6 spider iv amp through the Shortboard MKII seemed like a good idea and a great little project to maybe add to, who knows? I found http://sourceforge.net/projects/line6linux/ to be a most recent project that handles a driver module and a GUI. Support seemed a lil lacking since one person asked a question and seems yet to be answered 3 years later. But hey we all get busy sometimes , and documentation is not always priority. But here is a small helpful hint: The module or driver must first be build of course so we go to the directory $ cd ~/line6linux-code/driver/trunk do a $ make and then it should build the headers module in your kernel directory under $ /usr/source/linux-headers then we can su -c “insmod line6usb.ko” check that it was installed with $ lsmod that’s what I have checked so far, and ran into make errors for the apps ???? ok not too much on a Sunday night, goooo Packers!!!!

update: I found the driver doc here http://www.tanzband-scream.at/line6/driverdocs.pdf 

update: best use the mailing list for questions etc… thanks


by pete0verse at January 12, 2015 02:46 AM

January 11, 2015

Scores of Beauty

Partially Compiling a LilyPond Score

Partially recompiling a score has been a major LilyPond feature request for quite some time. I hope I have now found a promising path towards that goal, and today I’m going to present a first working version of that function. For this I’m heavily relying on Jan-Peter Voigt’s work on lalily and his Music Tree ideas. But fortunately what I’m proposing is very simple to use, without having to dive into the (still) complex world of the edition-engraver.

Injecting Stuff Into LilyPond Scores

The edition-engraver is a function taken from Jan-Peter’s lalily and integrated in openLilyLib. Its key feature is the possibility to “inject” elements into a score by assigning them to a voice, measure and measure-position. This makes it possible to define tweaks or additional elements in separate files and maintain the content separately from the presentational aspect. \shape commands to tweak slurs, manual breaks etc. don’t have to be mixed with the music anymore. Maybe the most important thing is that you can target different “editions”, e.g. the full score or parts, so this more or less makes the use of \tags obsolete.
I won’t go into more details about it today because the edition-engraver itself is not yet ready for general use or even inclusion into LilyPond. But as it is part of openLilyLib you can have a look at it on GitHub. Today I’m concentrating on a single use case and on presenting a new function I just added to openLilyLib.

Partially Compiling a LilyPond Score — The Manual Way

The LilyPond documentation explains how to save compilation (i.e. waiting) time by skipping music that is of no current interest. This can be controlled by the Score’s skipTypesetting property which can switch typesetting on and off at will. By inserting three of these switches in a music expression you can effectively clip a portion of the score for partial compilation:

{
  % Switch typesetting off at the start of the score
  \set Score.skipTypesetting = #t
  % some music that is currently uninteresting

  % Switch typesetting on
  \set Score.skipTypesetting = #f
  % The music we want to see

  % Switch typesetting off again
  \set Score.skipTypesetting = #t
}

While this is an efficient method to speed up compilation it is not really maintainable. You have to take care of all three commands, which is inconvenient and error-prone, especially when you have set up your score in multiple files. And you don’t want to have these entries affect the commits in the version control, which adds extra maintenance work and concentration. So I always wished there was a convenient automatic solution to make this approach more practical. But while my ideas had centered around preprocessing the input files with scripts I now realized that the edition-engraver is the tool of choice for the task.

Use the Edition Engraver for Partial Compilation

The edition-engraver is able to inject arbitrary skipTypesetting commands into a score like this:

\editionMod 
  clips 
  1 0/4 
  clip-regions.Score.A
  \set Score.skipTypesetting = ##t
  • \editionMod is the command to inject a single “mod”
  • clips is the “target”. Typical targets are score or parts, but I have defined the target clips for the purpose of this function
  • 1 0/4 denotes the first beat in the first measure (counting of the position in the measure is (so far?) zero-based because it’s not about “beats” but about the fraction of the time).
  • clip-regions.Score.A refers to the first (“A”) Score context in the clip-regions music tree (as described in Jan-Peter’s referenced posts).
  • finally \set Score.skipTypesetting = ##t is the command to be injected, telling LilyPond not to engrave the music starting at that point.

Using this I was able to wrap this in a Scheme function that takes two bar numbers as arguments and injects the mentioned three skipTypesetting commands at the appropriate points in the score. This function is now part of openLilyLib, and — provided you have “installed” that properly — you can simply write

\include "general-tools/clip-regions/definitions.ily"
\setClipRegion 34 49

to let LilyPond compile only measures 34 through 49 of the current score. Practically the function hides away the complexity of setting up the edition-engraver, and these two lines are really everything you need. Now this is actually maintainable while working on a score: If your focus moves to another section all you have to do is change the arguments to that function, or you can simply comment it out when you want to compile the whole score.

Once this was up and running I added another layer of comfort to this. When you are recreating an existing score (be it a hand-written draft or a historic edition) you are often working in the context of the original page layout. While entering and proofing music it makes sense to have LilyPond respect the original breaks because that significantly eases your navigation between the model and the score engraved by LilyPond. To support this workflow I added the functions \setClipPage and \setClipPageRange to let LilyPond compile a single page or a range of pages:

\include "general-tools/clip-regions/definitions.ily"
originalPageBreaks = #'(11 22 28 35 48 60)
% Comment out one of the following lines
\setClipPage 4
\setClipPageRange 1 3

Of course LilyPond doesn’t know by herself about the original page breaks, so the functions rely on the presence of a list originalPageBreaks that you have to provide. This is a simple Scheme list containing the bar numbers of all page breaks. So in the above example the “11″ refers to first barnumber on page 2, and it would compile measures 28–34 (page 4) or 1–27 (pages 1–3) of the score.

If you want to play around with the new function you can copy & paste the following example file and uncomment the different \setClip... lines to see their effect. This will also show you some validity checks built into the functions:

\version "2.18.0"

\include "general-tools/clip-regions/definitions.ily"

% Define a list with original page breaks (barnumbers)
originalPageBreaks = #'(112 224 336 448 560 672 784)

% Define a region with barnumbers
%\setClipRegion 8 25

% Compile a single page
%\setClipPage 5

% Compile a page range
%\setClipPageRange 4 5

% Negative page range triggers a warning
%\setClipPageRange 5 3

% Non-existent pages result in errors
%\setClipPageRange 3 123
%\setClipPage -2

music = \relative c' {
  \repeat unfold 800 {
    c d e d
  }
}

\score {
  \new Staff \music
}

[Edit] If you want to inspect the code of these new functions you can do so here. Considering their power this is remarkably simple Scheme code — which is due to the fact that the real complexity is hidden away behind the \include "editorial-tools/edition-engraver/definitions.ily".

Quo Vadis?

I think I will never again work without this on a score that takes a noticeable time to compile (which is about anything beyond basic music examples), and I hope this can be a useful addition for everybody else’s toolbox. But I hope this approach has a considerably more powerful potential: I think I see a way how this functionality can be integrated in the Frescobaldi IDE. It will allow you to define the range of the score that is compiled so you only need to wait for the engraving of the portion that actually interests you. The ultimate goal is to make Frescobaldi automatically recompile the system you are currently editing — which will bring the responsiveness of editing LilyPond scores to a new Level!

And once we have this we can think of anything else the edition-engraver can do for us to create fancy new editing/compilation features for Frescobaldi :-) .

by Urs Liska at January 11, 2015 11:00 PM

January 10, 2015

Create Digital Music » open-source

Can an Open Source Library Fix MIDI Sync on iOS?

ATastyPixel, maker of the wonderful Loopy, is busily working on the cleverly named Loopy: Masterpiece Edition – taking all that looping goodness and making it more robust for serious applications, from loop functionality to how it works with other tools.

That’s already good news. But developer Michael Tyson yesterday announced he’s going one step further. Not satisfied simply by finding a solution for MIDI Clock sync in his own app, he wants to create an open implementation all app developers can use, for free.

The vision: make apps and hardware all sync together with better performance, in a more usable way, so you can make music instead of wondering why everything is breaking.

There’s already a great-looking sample app syncing to Arturia’s BeatStep in the video.

Think of it as Audiobus for sync, only free. (No coincidence: Michael Tyson is a leading iOS audio developer and the man who built Audiobus.)

I’m eager to share the video this weekend as I know loads (hmm, possibly nearly all) iOS music developers are CDM readers now and then. I’m very curious what you think of the issues he describes, and the library he proposes. For those of us not deep into sync implementation issues, I don’t have to describe why this matters. But if you are into this, let us know what you think in comments. And you can bet we will closely track development of this tool on the site.

http://thespectacularsyncengine.com

Meanwhile, you can track the Masterpiece Edition of Loopy on its Tumblr dev blog:
http://masterpieceedition.tumblr.com

(Must read: why Objective-C is still the audio choice for now. Also an interesting discussion.)

syncengine

The post Can an Open Source Library Fix MIDI Sync on iOS? appeared first on Create Digital Music.

by Peter Kirn at January 10, 2015 01:43 PM

January 08, 2015

Scores of Beauty

Can you shift pitches to a different mode in Frescobaldi?

It all started with a thread on the Frescobaldi mailing list with the basic underlying question: Can the modal transpose (in Frescobaldi) be used to shift from one mode to another? After some discussion the answer turned out to be both yes and no.

Below I’ll elaborate on this apparent inconsistency and also introduce a new feature to accommodate the request for a tool to shift between modes.

How Modal Transpose can’t be used to shift mode

Frescobaldi provides a transpose tool that emulates LilyPond’s \transpose function but actually changes the content of the input file. In September 2013 Christopher Brian added Modal Transpose to Frescobaldi that also transposes the music input but keeps the pitches within the given scale.

I’ll give a simple example to explain the intended use of the modal transposer. To my mind this is best illustrated by the use of chords. Take a C major chord:

<c e g>

If we transpose it upwards one step with the ordinary transpose (C D) we would get a D major chord. But if we use the modal transpose in the key of C major (with the command 1 C), we get a D minor chord:

<d f a>

Similarly we would get E minor instead of E major and A minor instead of A major. Again, this is because the modal transpose transposes music within the notes of the given key or scale.

Let’s now return to the question, can this function be used to shift pitches from one mode to another, from say the key of C major to the key of C minor?

The function only allows for major modes so a shift to minor would be out of the question. But we could try to do the opposite – change the mode from C minor to C major. Minor I would interpret as harmonic minor in this case. Here’s the C harmonic minor scale:

c4 d es f g as b

On that we’ll try the modal transpose command 0 C (meaning transpose 0 steps within the key or mode of C major). With this command you might expect the mode to change from C minor to the given C major (i. e. es change to e and as change to a). But instead you see no change at all. Why is that?

The explanation is that if some of the original pitches are outside the given key their alteration will be kept and the pitches will not be adjusted to that key. Hence you can’t use this functionality to shift between different keys or modes. It is meant for in-scale transpositions such as contrapuntal imitations.

I’ll return to the case of chords to illustrate this. Take a chord that is not in the key of C major, let’s say the D major chord.

<d fis a>

And transpose it one step down (-1 C) we’ll then not get a C major chord, but instead:

<c eis g>

This is because the note that is outside the C major scale (F-sharp) retains its alteration after the modal transpose (E-sharp). To sum up the pitches which are inside the given key will stay inside the key no matter how many steps we transpose. And those pitches which are outside the given key will stay outside and not adapt to the given key.

From the above study it seems that a mode shifter is far from what is intended by the modal transpose. But there is in fact a way that this can be done at least to a limited degree.

How Modal Transpose can be used to shift mode

The special trick is to use modal transpose and ordinary (chromatic) transpose in combination. You would then make use of the fact that different modes have the same set of pitches. (This trick was first suggested by Paul Morris.)

Let’s go back to the request above – a shift in mode from C minor to C major. Let’s also interpret C minor as C natural minor this time although this may be a little more far-fetched.

c d es f g as bes

The first step is to use the regular transpose to shift from C natural minor to A natural minor (C A).

a' b c d e f g

As you can see the pitches are now in the scale of C major due to the fact that A natural minor and C major have the same set of pitches. The next step is thus to use the modal (in-scale) transpose to move back to original position while still keeping all the pitches inside C major. We do that with the command -5 C.

c d e f g a b

And then we have in fact changed the pitches from C natural minor to C major. Now if we wanted we could change back to C natural minor. We would then follow the steps in the opposite order (first modal transpose down 5 steps in the key of C major, then ordinary transpose back from A to C).

This neat trick can be used whenever two modes share the same pitches. But it’s limited to those cases. That means that you can’t for example change from C major to C harmonic minor.

Furthermore as seen above if the original pitches aren’t all part of one scale those external pitches will not be adjusted to the resulting scale. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing; it can be quite desirable. But it means that in some situations you can’t be sure that the result complies to the proposed scale.

Although an interesting workaround this is of course awkward and too limited for extended use. Wouldn’t it be possible for Frescobaldi to have a function that let you shift mode easily?

The new mode shifter

From now on this story will get a little more personal as it’s time to turn from the limitations and possibilities of the existing transpose tools to the creation of a new tool. I hope you don’t mind!

The mentioned thread on the Frescobaldi mailing list got my attention, and to settle my curiosity I started a little research into the matter. I had only very little experience with the modal transpose up to that point.

At first perhaps influenced by the idea of the modal transpose as a means of introducing a new mode I couldn’t figure out why the function didn’t yield results according to the commanded scale. But after having carefully read through the code of the function I finally realized the secrets of the modal transpose (insights I of course tried to share above).

I also realized that I was too deeply involved already. The request of a function to change the mode was added as a wish to the Frescobaldi issue tracker, and furthermore having carefully read through the code I had some vague idea how it could be implemented. I felt that it would be a real waste to leave it with that. I assigned myself to deal with the wish, started to delve deeper into the task and didn’t look back.

I have no intention of boring you with details of how I decided to solve the task. But I’d like to mention one fundamental thing: When I scrutinized the code of the modal transpose I also got a good look at the code of the regular transpose. This function is written by Wilbert Berendsen (of course the creator of Frescobaldi himself). And as always it was very rewarding reading through the code that Wilbert has written (he and Frescobaldi in my world naturally deserves all the credit that can be given). And my decision was to rely on that existing code as much as possible.

At the time of writing this a first version of the new function which I decided to call Mode Shift (Tools->Pitch->Mode shift) has been merged into Frescobaldi master. With a little care and further development I think it can turn into a nice and useful addition to the other editing tools. Please don’t hesitate to give the feedback that would reinforce that process!

The new Mode shift menu item.

The new Mode shift menu item.

How Mode Shift can be used to shift mode

To show how the new function works we can once again return to the request to change from C (harmonic) minor to C major.

c4 d es f g as b

We enter C major in the Mode Shift dialogue and the pitches shift accordingly:

c d e f g a b

It should perhaps be added that there need not be any from scale. Any note would be adjusted to fit inside the given scale. To illustrate this we could take three chords C major, D major and E major.

<c e g> <d fis a> <e gis b>

After the shift all pitches outside the C major scale have been adjusted to the nearest step inside the scale, thus we have C major, D minor and E minor as expected.

<c e g> <d f a> <e g b>

As always please share any questions or feedback in a comment!

by Peter Bjuhr at January 08, 2015 06:09 PM

January 07, 2015

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

MusE 2.2 released

Following hot on the heels of recent beta releases, the MusE developers have finally announced the stable release of version 2.2. The big news with this stable release is that MusE now has support for LV2 plugins.

For full details, check out the announcement on the Linux Audio users mailing list.

by Conor at January 07, 2015 11:30 AM

LMP Asks #4: An interview with the 'Infamous' Spencer Jackson

In our first interview of the year, LMP talks to the brains behind the Infamous Plugins suite, Spencer Jackson.

Hi Spencer. Thanks a lot for doing this interview! Where do you live, and what do you do for a living?

I live in Logan, Utah, USA. I’m an electrical engineer in the R&D department at ICON Health and Fitness. I do a lot of embedded development and focus on maintaining product quality in our Freemotion brand.

by Conor at January 07, 2015 09:05 AM

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] MusE 2.2 released

From: Robert Jonsson <spamatica@...>
Subject: [LAA] MusE 2.2 released
Date: Jan 7, 8:45 am 2015

MusE 2.2 - 2015-01-06

Hi All!

Following our plan of making monthly releases. Ah, I mean yearly releases...
Well, actually, it's been nearly two years since last stable release. Sorry.

Here we are anyway with a new release of MusE, and we think it's a good one!
Since last we have moved to github and Andrew has joined the team to, among
other things implement LV2 support, which he has done excellently. We are
quite happy with the current state and music has been recorded with MusE like
never before, some demonstrations are listed below.

Major feature improvements of this release includes:

* Support for LV2 Synths and effects
- effects are supported both in Effect rack and in Arranger
- State interface
- Worker interface.
- Instance-access.
- KX studio Programs interface + extended programs interface to support
per-channel bank/patch change (only Yoshimi now supports this feature).
- Common must-have features: Atom, buf-size, event, options, uri-map, urid.
+ Other extensions: CV type lv2 ports
+ LV2_TIME__Position
+ Atom_Event_Transfer support for plugin->UI communication
+ LV2 path MAP and MAKE extensions
+ LV2 LOG extension
- UI interface. Supported UI subtypes:
+ QT4
+ GTK2
+ GTKMM2
+ X11
+ External interfaces (from kx studio specs).
+ idle callbacks

* Yet another MAJOR audio engine and plugin/synth process chain re-write
- Track controllers (vol, pan) now sample-accurate and near noise-less

Numerous bug fixes and minor enhancements:
- Metronome with accent clicks and replaceable clicks
- Synths rearranged in separate menus
- Reworked the PluginDialog to use a ui file and give more filter
possibilities
- Added [HOME] button to file open dialog
- Ignore undo/redo while recording
- Fix crash reported by LakeIshikawa: Pressing delete while clicking or
dragging events or parts
- Fixed copy/paste problem: Paste copies not clones, if the original
parts/tracks have been deleted.
- More commands support Undo/Redo, like setting global tempo.
- Some new scripts, RemoveAftertouch, TempoDelay
- Fix song not 'dirty' on many operations (close was not prompting to save).
- Instrument Editor now basically complete: Added Initialization Sequence
editor.
- Sysex event editor now allows selection from pre-defined Instrument Sysex
list.
- Revised and edited Roland SD-50.idf by Patrick (split into GM2/nonGM2).
- MusE now imports GM2 midi files. (Properly selects GM2 instrument.)
- Added a visual metronome to Bigtime
- Added line drawing of tempo in graphical master track editor
- Fixed bug (issue #342 Moving Aux sends crashes muse)
- Added more keyboard shortcuts in midi editors
- Mods/fixes to Midi Input Transformator plugin:
- When midi in is enabled in drum editor the selected track is moved along
with the triggered key
- Fixed bug with playback of drums clicking on notes in the new drum editor,
it was playing the wrong instrument
- MESS synths (esp Deicsonze): Controls (like Track Info program) and synth
controls now mirror each other, both ways.
- Deicsonze softsynth: Fixed: Not remembering settings + ladspa plugin
settings, midi controllers moved to NRPN14 type.
- Native VST: Call idle periodically. Makes some plugins like Glitch work,
as per LAD mail.
- Change window title when there are unsaved changes
- Add auto-save feature, when enabled tries to save after 5 minutes
- Added pitch control to SimpleDrums, first version
- Fixed Ctrl+arrows in the arranger so the track list is scrolled

For more informati [message continues]

read more

January 07, 2015 09:00 AM

January 04, 2015

Talk Unafraid

A brief foray into explosions

Every year, myself, my family and some friends get together on New Year’s Eve, have a lovely meal and at midnight, let off the obligatory fireworks. Their house is surrounded by farmland so we have a huge amount of space, making operation of larger fireworks possible, but we’ve in past years stuck to firing the larger end of garden fireworks (category 2).

This year, tired of the inevitable mucking around with unreliable gas lighters at midnight, we decided to take a look at electronic ignition systems and upgrade to category 3 “display” fireworks.

We picked up a 12 cue electronic firing system from Wireless Fireworks, who kindly got next-day delivery sorted out on zero notice so we could get everything before NYE. We also grabbed a box of 50 Talon igniters with 4 metre cables, to let us wire the whole display (which ended up only using ~20 igniters, so we have some for next time). As well as being wireless the main advantage of this box over the cheaper/distributed ones (in my mind at least) was that it had a continuity test function, along with a real keyed safety switch – which is a requirement if you ask me. The labelling leaves a lot to be desired – I’ve modified ours so the safety switch is labelled “SAFE” and “ARM” instead of the ambiguous “OFF” and “ON” (safety on = safe? Nope! Safety on = armed…).

The Talon igniters are just bits of fuse wire and a well-designed clip. They clip onto the green/pink fuses you’ll find on any cat2/3 firework and just get very hot – the lack of pyro in the igniters is a huge plus. We had one failure out of our 18 effects which looks to have been a continuity issue. Which brings me to the box that doesn’t exist yet but someone really should make…

You might notice that I said we used 18 effects but that we only have 12 channels. The box is designed to let you pair up effects – we didn’t try more than 2 in a channel but I suspect 3 would work fine. But our one failure was one of these paired effects – probably just the connector not making a good contact with the wire for that effect. In future I plan to solder the ends together for paired effects to make a solid connection between the two fired effects, such that if any continuity check passes, it’s a pass for everything. Ideally you’d have a box that had one wire out to the main box, then two connectors for igniters with switches to let you do continuity checks per-igniter once it’s all wired.

This has all lead me to think it might be a fun project to try making a firing box of my own using the Talon igniters. All it really needs is a battery, some relays or other switches capable of handling the load, continuity test functionality and some safety mechanics around when the current-unrestricted battery connection is made, but that’s all quite straightforward – it’d be nice to have a larger system that could scale up to higher channel counts, but commercial offerings over about 12 channels are all quite expensive! The wireless functionality is nice, but I’d rather have something secure – much to my surprise, the wireless system in these firing boxes is a classic 433MHz type of the sort you’d find in remote controlled switches/mains plugs. Replacing this with WPA2 encrypted 5GHz wifi or a 433/896MHz encrypted wireless system would be nice.

Still, the end result was great – being able to let everything off within seconds of each other (and hitting midnight with a volley of big rockets) was fantastic, and while there was about 4 hours spent setting it all up, I could for the first time stand with friends and family to let everything off. Lots of fun and much safer to boot!

Of course, no fireworks post would be complete without some pictures of the end result – I tried taking my pictures this year with CHDK running on a Canon Powershot G10 with a motion detection script. It almost worked flawlessly…

IMG_0050IMG_0066IMG_0042IMG_0049IMG_0046

by James Harrison at January 04, 2015 03:38 PM

Hackaday » digital audio hacks

Digital to Analog to Digital to Analog to Digital Conversion

[Andy] had the idea of turning a mixing desk into a MIDI controller. At first glance, this idea seems extremely practical – mixers are a great way to get a lot of dials and faders in a cheap, compact, and robust enclosure. Exactly how you turn a mixer into a MIDI device is what’s important. This build might not be the most efficient, but it does have the best name ever: digital to analog to digital to analog to digital conversion.

The process starts by generating a sine wave on an Arduino with some direct digital synthesis. A 480 Hz square wave is generated on an ATTiny85. Both of these signals are then fed into a 74LS08 AND gate. According to the schematic [Andy] posted, these signals are going into two different gates, with the other input of the gate pulled high. The output of the gate is then sent through a pair of resistors and combined to the ‘audio out’ signal. [Andy] says this is ‘spine-crawling’ for people who do this professionally. If anyone knows what this part of the circuit actually does, please leave a note in the comments.

The signal from the AND gates is then fed into the mixer and sent out to the analog input of another Arduino. This Arduino converts the audio coming out of the mixer to frequencies using a Fast Hartley Transform. With a binary representation of what’s happening inside the mixer, [Andy] has something that can be converted into MIDI.

[Andy] put up a demo of this circuit working. He’s connected the MIDI out to Abelton and can modify MIDI parameters using an audio mixer. Video of that below if you’re still trying to wrap your head around this one.


Filed under: Arduino Hacks, digital audio hacks

by Brian Benchoff at January 04, 2015 06:00 AM

January 03, 2015

Linuxaudio.org

Linux Audio Conference 2015

We are happy to announce the next issue of the Linux Audio Conference
(LAC), April 9-12, 2015 @ JGU | Johannes Gutenberg University, in
Mainz, Germany.

This year's conference is hosted by the Computer Music Research Group
(Bereich Musikinformatik) at the IKM (Institut für Kunstgeschichte und
Musikwissenschaft) of the Johannes Gutenberg University (JGU) at
Mainz.

http://lac.linuxaudio.org/2015/

by Jeremy at January 03, 2015 08:37 PM

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

Calf developers working towards new release

The Calf developers recently met up to discuss the up and coming release, version 0.0.60. All in all there are now 44 plugins that make up the Calf suite.

For more information, check out Markus Schmidt's blog post.

by Conor at January 03, 2015 08:04 PM

Linux Audio Conference 2015 - Call for Participation

The Linux Audio Conference has been announced and will be taking place in Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz, Germany from the 9th to the 12th of April.

Frank Neumann has posted on the Linux Audio mailing lists including details on submissions and participation.

by Conor at January 03, 2015 07:58 PM

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] Linux Audio Conference 2015 - Call for Participation

From: Albert Graef <aggraef@...>
Subject: [LAA] Linux Audio Conference 2015 - Call for Participation
Date: Jan 3, 1:56 pm 2015

--001a11c3135e469bf8050bbe60a0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

[Sorry for cross-posting, please distribute.]

Linux Audio Conference 2015 - Call for Participation

(Due to exceptional circumstances, this announcement comes a bit late,
so please note the early deadline of Feb 1st for submissions. We
apologize.)

We are happy to announce the next issue of the Linux Audio Conference
(LAC), April 9-12, 2015 @ JGU | Johannes Gutenberg University, in
Mainz, Germany.

http://lac.linuxaudio.org/2015/

The Linux Audio Conference is an international conference that brings
together musicians, sound artists, software developers and researchers,
working with Linux as an open, stable, professional platform for audio
and media research and music production. LAC includes paper sessions,
workshops, and a diverse program of electronic music.

*Call for Papers, Workshops, Music and Installations*

We invite submissions of papers addressing all areas of audio processing
and media creation based on Linux and other open source software. Papers
can focus on technical, artistic and scientific issues and should target
developers or users. In our call for music, we are looking for works
that have been produced or composed entirely/mostly using Linux and
other open source music software.

The online submission of papers, workshops, music and installations is
now open at http://lac.linuxaudio.org/2015/participation

The deadline for all submissions is Feb 1st, 2015 (23:59 HAST).

You are invited to register for participation on our conference website.
There you will find up-to-date instructions, as well as important
information about dates, travel, lodging, and so on.

This year's conference is hosted by the Computer Music Research Group
(Bereich Musikinformatik) at the IKM (Institut f=C3=BCr Kunstgeschichte und
Musikwissenschaft) of the Johannes Gutenberg University (JGU) at
Mainz. Being founded in 1991, our research group has been among the
first German academic institutions in this interdisciplinary field at
the intersection of music, mathematics, computer science and media
technology. In our media lab students are working almost exclusively
with Linux, and in our research we are also devoted to contributing to
the growing body of open source audio and computer music software.

http://www.musikwissenschaft.uni-mainz.de/Musikinformatik/

We look forward to your submissions and hope to meet you in Mainz in
April!

Sincerely,
The LAC 2015 Organizing Team

--=20
Dr. Albert Gr"af
Computer Music Research Group, JGU Mainz, Germany
Email: aggraef@gmail.com
WWW: https://plus.google.com/+AlbertGraef

--001a11c3135e469bf8050bbe60a0
Content-Type: text/html; charset=UTF-8
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

[Sorry for cross-posting, please distribute.]

Linux=
Audio Conference 2015 - Call for Participation

(Due to exceptional =
circumstances, this announcement comes a bit late,
so please note the ea=
rly deadline of Feb 1st for submissions. We
apologize.)

We are ha=
ppy to announce the next issue of the Linux Audio Conference
(LAC), Apri=
l 9-12, 2015 @ JGU | Johannes Gutenberg University, in
Mainz, Germany.
r>
=C2=A0=C2=A0 http://lac.l=
inuxaudio.org/2015/


The Linux Audio Conference is an internation=
al conference that brings
together musicians, sound artists, software de=
velopers and researchers,
working with Linux as an open, stable, profess=
ional platform for audio
and media research and musi [message continues]

read more

January 03, 2015 02:00 PM

[LAA] MIDI Trigger LV2 plug-in announce

From: Viacheslav Lotsmanov <lotsmanov89@...>
Subject: [LAA] MIDI Trigger LV2 plug-in announce
Date: Jan 3, 1:56 pm 2015

--047d7b3a823aa7af17050bb2a49c
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8

We released our plug-in which sends MIDI notes by audio peaks under
GNU/GPLv3.

It has one audio input port and one MIDI output port. It works like
trigger-sampler, but more unix-way (without sampler). You just send output
MIDI note to sampler that you love. You can save dynamic of your audio
signal, just use velocity controls.

About "Note-off mode" control you can read here:
https://github.com/metachronica/audio-dsp-midi-trigger/blob/6992e837f8cdce165f394dee82b6e4eee039aa71/src/types.h#L52-L60
We'll document it in the future more user-friendly.

https://github.com/metachronica/audio-dsp-midi-trigger

First release here:
https://github.com/metachronica/audio-dsp-midi-trigger/releases/tag/v0.0.1

--047d7b3a823aa7af17050bb2a49c
Content-Type: text/html; charset=UTF-8
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

We released our plug-in which sends MIDI notes by aud=
io peaks under GNU/GPLv3.

It has one audio input port and=
one MIDI output port. It works like trigger-sampler, but more unix-way (wi=
thout sampler). You just send output MIDI note to sampler that you love. Yo=
u can save dynamic of your audio signal, just use velocity controls.


>
We'll document it in the fut=
ure more user-friendly.

>

--047d7b3a823aa7af17050bb2a49c--

read more

January 03, 2015 02:00 PM

January 01, 2015

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

Updated Ardour FLOSS manual

Bruno Ruviaro has just finished updating the Ardour FLOSS manual. It was originally created in 2009 and was based on Ardour 2. Bruno has now updated it so it is now relevant to Ardour 3 and it's operations, including new screenshots.

The updated version can be found here.

by Conor at January 01, 2015 10:39 PM

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] LSA 0.1.0

From: Mark Karpov <markkarpov@...>
Subject: [LAA] LSA 0.1.0
Date: Jan 1, 2:35 pm 2015


I would like to announce LSA (LiSt properties of Audio files). This is a
minimal, lightweight, console, Unix-style program to list various
parameters of audio files.

'Unix-style' means that it tries to do one thing and do it well.

LSA also tries to be fast. It has been written in C, it's multithreading
(creates one thread per physical core), it uses SSE and SSE2 intrinsics
(some people are still using some AMD processors that have no support
for SSE4). If you ever have to wait for results, it's because of hard
drive speed or decompression. Decompression is performed by Audio File
library, so I cannot easily speed up this.

LSA is built on top of Audio File library, so it inherits its list of
supported file formats:

* AIFF/AIFF-C (.aiff, .aifc)
* WAVE (.wav)
* NeXT .snd/Sun .au (.snd, .au)
* Berkeley/IRCAM/CARL Sound File (.sf)
* Audio Visual Research (.avr)
* Amiga IFF/8SVX (.iff)
* Sample Vision (.smp)
* Creative Voice File (.voc)
* NIST SPHERE (.wav)
* Core Audio Format (.caf)
* FLAC (.flac)

Supported compression formats:

* G.711 mu-law and A-law
* IMA ADPCM
* Microsoft ADPCM
* FLAC
* ALAC (Apple Lossless Audio Codec)

The program currently is capable to display the following parameters:

* sample rate;
* sample width;
* sample format (signed or unsigned integer, single or double precision
floating point);
* number of channels;
* length in minutes, seconds, and hours (if necessary) per file;
* total length of all files in actual directory;
* number of frames per file;
* total number of frames of all files in actual directory;
* peak [0..1] per file;
* maximum peak among all files in actual directory;
* compression scheme.

TODO:

* efficiently calculate perceived loudness (as per ITU-R BS.1770-3);
* efficiently calculate loudness range.

LSA repository is here: https://github.com/mrkkrp/lsa

Documentation: LSA comes with its own man page

License: GNU GPL
_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-announce mailing list
Linux-audio-announce@lists.linuxaudio.org
http://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-announce

read more

January 01, 2015 03:00 PM

December 30, 2014

Arch Linux Pro Audio

Interview with Hlynur – Arch based Glitch DnB producer

December passes, with the holiday season and lots of time off… Here at ArchAudio.org we talk to 18 year old programmer / sys-admin / producer Hlynur about using linux to create glitch music.

Hi, thanks for taking time to chat to ArchAudio.org! Who are you, and what
are your interests?

Hey! My name is Hlynur, and I’m a 18 year old programmer from Iceland. My interest include Competitive Programming, Linux, All things Glitch (Music, Art, etc) and Electronic Dance Music (my favorite sub-genres include Glitch / Glitch Hop / Dubstep / Drum and Bass)

Wow competitive programming, what does that involve? And what are your
favorite tools?

You need to solve various problems (Mathematical or the like) computationally under a time constraint, it’s really fun. My favorite programming language is Python and vim is the best editor ever. Ofcourse, I can’t forget the window manager i3!

You mentioned a lot of electronic and glitch music, are you a musician?

That’s the funny part… I have no musical talents, but I listen to a lot of music. I just started playing around with LMMS last week and have been getting way better results than I thought I was capable of!

So you’re impressed with LMMS and the Linux Audio eco-system? Is there any
synth or feature of LMMS in particular you’re fond of?

Really impressed, I was pleasently surprised when I found LMMS and just had to try it out. I still have a lot to learn about LMMS and music in general, so I’m still just experimenting and trying to find my sound

Any closing notes you’d like to add?

I tried to get into EDM back when I used Windows, But I just was having a hard time finding help and support at the time. But I feel as the LMMS community does an amazing job with helping beginners get their footing in their software and in music.

Thanks to Hlynur for talking to ArchAudio.org!

by harryhaaren at December 30, 2014 05:06 PM

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] CLAP, new virtual instrument and effect plugin interface proposal

From: Alexandre Bique <bique.alexandre@...>
Subject: [LAA] CLAP, new virtual instrument and effect plugin interface proposal
Date: Dec 30, 10:30 am 2014

Hi,

I worked on a new plugin interface, it is not yet finished and set in
stone, but ready enough to gather initial feedback and advice.

The specification is hosted on github:
https://github.com/free-audio/clap and is available under the MIT
license. There is a generated specification document at:
http://free-audio.github.io/clap/

I hope that you'll find it interesting and give it a chance. Thanks.

Regards,
--
Alexandre Bique
_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-announce mailing list
Linux-audio-announce@lists.linuxaudio.org
http://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-announce

read more

December 30, 2014 11:00 AM

December 28, 2014

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

LMMS 1.1 is here!!

The LMMS team have released the long-postponed 1.1 release. Along with a ton of bug fixes, changes include -

  • 3 new native synth instruments
  • Fully modular FX mixer
  • Updated ZynAddSubFx
  • Automation live recording

Check out the announcement and further details over at linuxmusicians.com.

 

by Conor at December 28, 2014 05:19 PM

Guitarix 0.32.2 bug fix release

The Guitarix devs have just pushed out a bug fix release aimed to stabilize the Guitarix experience. Changes include -

by Conor at December 28, 2014 05:12 PM

December 26, 2014

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] Guitarix 0.32.2

From: Hermann Meyer <brummer-@...>
Subject: [LAA] Guitarix 0.32.2
Date: Dec 26, 8:17 pm 2014

Again, a Bug-fix release is out which is aimed to stabilize the experience.

* fix some rcstyle bugs for gtk-2.24.25 and maybe fixed them for KDE
as well
* allow load of preset-files witch contain Denormal Numbers (flush to
zero)
* add warning when denormal value found in preset file
* if parameter is out of range, set it to the default value
* add missing Icons to glade-gxw
* add wavesharper plugin
* use long int to compare regions size in gx_mlock.cc -> (Gcc: 4.9.2)

download here:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/guitarix/

enjoy.

_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-announce mailing list
Linux-audio-announce@lists.linuxaudio.org
http://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-announce

read more

December 26, 2014 09:00 PM

Hackaday » digital audio hacks

The Four Thousand Dollar MP3 Player

[Pat]’s friend got a Pono for Christmas, a digital audio player that prides itself on having the highest fidelity of any music player. It’s a digital audio device designed in hand with [Neil Young], a device that had a six million dollar Kickstarter, and is probably the highest-spec audio device that will be released for the foreseeable future.

The Pono is an interesting device. Where CDs have 16-bit, 44.1 kHz audio, the Pono can play modern lossless formats – up to 24-bit, 192 kHz audio. There will undoubtedly be audiophiles arguing over the merits of higher sampling rates and more bits, but there is one way to make all those arguments moot: building an MP3 player out of an oscilloscope.

Digital audio players are limited by the consumer market; there’s no economical way to put gigasamples per second into a device that will ultimately sell for a few thousand dollars. Oscilloscopes are not built for the consumer market, though, and the ADCs and DACs in a medium-range scope will always be above what a simple audio player can manage.

[Pat] figured the Tektronicx MDO3000 series scope sitting on his bench would be a great way to capture and play music and extremely high bit rates. He recorded a song to memory at a ‘lazy’ 1 Megasample per second through analog channel one. From there, a press of the button made this sample ready for playback (into a cheap, battery-powered speaker, of course).

Of course this entire experiment means nothing. the FLAC format can only handle a sampling rate of up to 655 kilosamples per second. While digital audio formats could theoretically record up to 2.5 Gigasamples per second, the question of ‘why’ would inevitably enter into the minds of audio engineers and anyone with an ounce of sense. Short of recording music from the master tapes or another analog source directly into an oscilloscope, there’s no way to obtain music at this high of a bit rate. It’s just a dumb demonstration, but it is the most expensive MP3 player you can buy.


Filed under: digital audio hacks, tool hacks

by Brian Benchoff at December 26, 2014 03:00 PM

Recent changes to blog

Guitarix 0.32.2

Again, a Bug-fix release is out which is aimed to stabilize the experience.

  • fix some rcstyle bugs for gtk-2.24.25 and maybe fixed them for KDE as well
  • allow load of preset-files witch contain Denormal Numbers (flush to zero)
  • add warning when denormal value found in preset file
  • if parameter is out of range, set it to the default value
  • add missing Icons to glade-gxw
  • add wavesharper plugin
  • use long int to compare regions size in gx_mlock.cc -> (Gcc: 4.9.2)

enjoy.

by brummer at December 26, 2014 05:10 AM

OpenAV

OpenAV progressing all the time!

OpenAV progressing all the time!

Although its the festive season, there’s no reason some serious progress can’t be made during the festivities right? Well here at OpenAV we see no mutual exclusion there anyway! Progress Report Fabla2 is coming along very well: in the past few days, LV2 State save() and restore() have been implemented. This means saving sessions and presets is now possible, and… Read more →

by harry at December 26, 2014 01:38 AM

December 25, 2014

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] Nama multitrack recorder v1.203

From: Joel Roth <joelz@...>
Subject: [LAA] Nama multitrack recorder v1.203
Date: Dec 25, 9:22 pm 2014

I am happy to announce Nama version 1.203. With this
release, the effects-handling code has been fully converted
to Nama's OO model and several issues resolved.

* fix spurious reconfiguration
* effect chains apply parameters
* restore playback position to zero after recording
* kill Ecasound on exit in NetECI mode
* correctly handle user effect addressing (aliases and effect chain affiliation)
* fix drift in Master track volume
* add CONTRIBUTORS to man page
* add-effect/remove-effect accepts effect chain name as well as effect ID
* fix parsing of Ecasound chain operator parameter names

For users, the add-effect and remove-effect commands will
now work on effect chains as well as simple effects. Effects
can be addressed by effect ID, user alias or effect code.
Some bus-related commands have been renamed to conform
standard terminology.

For those who care to prod and hack the sources, Nama's
variables, defined in src/var_*, are now documented in
var_overview.[1]

I welcome feedback from any tire-kicking, torture-testing
etc.

Thanks to the Linux audio community, to Kai Vehmanen for
Ecasound and to Nama's user community for their invaluable
assistance.

DESCRIPTION
===========

Nama is a digital audio workstation. It is suitable for
multitrack recording, effects-processing, editing, mixing,
and other audio tasks. Nama uses Ecasound, developed by Kai
Vehmanen, for audio processing. Nama hosts LADSPA and LV2
plugins, Ecasound effects and controllers. It works well
under JACK and ALSA.

New projects begin with a mixer, and may include tracks,
takes, buses, effects, sends, inserts, marks, regions,
fades, edits, sequences and submixes, with mixdown to wav,
ogg, mp3.

Nama has a full-featured command interpreter with TAB
completion, keyword help and command history; a hotkey mode
for tweaking effect parameters, a Tk-based GUI, and project
management (history, branching, tags) based on git.

INSTALLATION
============

The easiest way to install Nama, is using a CPAN
client such as cpan or cpanm:

cpanm Audio::Nama

PERL_MM_USE_DEFAULT=1 cpan Audio::Nama

Other dependencies are Ecasound, LADSPA SDK (for LADSPA
plugin support), LILV utilities (for LV2 plugin support),
and midish (for MIDI capabilities).

1. This and other source files are available from the git
repository at http://github.com/bolangi/nama

--
Joel Roth


_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-announce mailing list
Linux-audio-announce@lists.linuxaudio.org
http://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-announce

read more

December 25, 2014 10:00 PM

Hackaday » digital audio hacks

8-Bit Chip Rocks 16-Bit 44.1kHz Tunes

There’s a special place in our hearts for chip tunes generated with your favorite microcontroller. But why stop there? Full-featured audio is a great challenge and it’s not often we see examples of this caliber. It puts out CD-quality audio using not much more than a microcontroller.

How do you get 16-bit audio out of an 8-bit microcontroller. We’ll give you a hint: two pins are used. Not helping? Here it comes: two 8-bit DACs PWM outputs are used on this chip, the ATmega1284. One is used for the lower eight bits, the other handles the upper. The two are combined using carefully calculated precision resistor values and the results are beyond what you imagine. This is produced at a bitrate of 44077.135, slightly off from the 44100Hz standard but we challenge you audiophiles to tell the difference. The wave files are served from an SD card read by the chip using the Petit-FatFs library.

There are so many great things about this project. First off, following [Wancheng Zhou’s] example will let anyone with even basic microcontroller skills build a digital audio player for an [Andrew Jackson] and a couple of [Washingtons]. Secondly, those with a medium uC skill level will want to take the idea and implement/debug it for themselves. Bringing it home, [Wancheng] shows how to gauge the quality of the audio output using FFT.

If you didn’t figure it out by the time of year, this is yet another example of a Cornell ECE 4760 final project. Shout out to [Bruce Land] for inspiring awesome projects and requiring extensive documentation of the projects which itself promotes deeper understand all around.

[via Hackaday.io]


Filed under: digital audio hacks, Microcontrollers

by Mike Szczys at December 25, 2014 12:01 PM

December 21, 2014

Talk Unafraid

Setting up the Taranis X9D+ and OpenTX

With more complex stuff on my quad comes an increased need for a more complex radio, so I opted to upgrade from an aging Turnigy 9X to a FrSky Taranis X9D+ with an X8R receiver – this nets me not only 16 channels via S.BUS on the receiver and a telemetry link, but a fancy programmable transmitter!

It’s a bit daunting to get it all set up but pretty easy once you get the hang of it. This is going to be a quick writeup of how I went about setting it up, configuring the transmitter for the Pixhawk flight controller and flight modes, and some nice things to know that aren’t that clear from the docs.

So the first thing you want is the OpenTX Companion. The companion will handle downloading and flashing firmware for you. On Windows 7 you’ll also need the zadig utility; plug your radio in (switched off) and then open zadig, find STM32 BOOTLOADER and hit the big button. That’ll get your drivers set up right.

When you start the Companion will ask if you want to go ahead and flash the radio – don’t yet. You want to dive into Settings -> Settings, tell it which radio you’re using, and check “noheli” and “lua” options. Other stuff it’s worth setting in there include the automatic backup path in application settings, and the SD structure path. The SD structure path points at a local copy of the SD card so you can get sounds etc.

Which brings us to the SD card. Pop it out, back up the contents somewhere, wipe it clean and replace the contents with this copy off the FrSky website. This includes an extensive sound set and is generally up-to-date. You’ll also want to keep a copy of this (with any changes you make) on your PC for the simulator and settings dialogs.

Flash, aaa-ah! Saviour of the universe!

Now we should have a radio with a newly-filled miniSD card, but some old firmware. Plug the radio in on USB with the radio powered down, and then hit the “Download” button in OpenTX Companion. Download the latest firmware somewhere and then hit Read/Write -> Write Firmware. Once it’s done you can reboot and check it all works.

Once you’ve done that, power down the radio again, unplug it, and start it up while pressing the two bottom trim switches towards the power switch. This gets you into the bootloader. Plug in your USB cable and your SD card will show up in Windows – but most importantly you can go ahead and hit “Read models from radio”. This gets you a copy of everything in your radio to start with. You can then proceed to start tweaking! You need to go back to this mode to be able to write stuff, too.

Mixing it up

Let’s open a model up and take a look. For starters we’ve got the setup page. This has simple stuff like what radio system to use, switch and pot warnings, and timers. Timers are helpful for keeping track of battery usage (though if you get telemetry set up, that’s good too) – I have one set up to count down my expected battery life using the THs counter.

Next we have the flight modes. Skip this tab for now. Briefly, though, a little aside on terminology.

The Taranis has a bunch of inputs. Throttle, elevator, rudder etc are named what you’d expect but other physical controls are things like SA, SB, etc. There’s also S1/S2, and L1/L2. The latter four are pots – S1/2 on the front, L1/2 on the sides. The former are switches – you have $MANY on the X9D+. Where you see things like an arrow pointing up/down next to a switch, that’s going to evaluate to “on” if that’s the state the switch is in.

In inputs we can assign each physical control to an input channel. I’ve done this for four switches. The benefit of adding these here rather than directly in the mixer is that we can apply things like curves to them. This is actually very useful for the Pixhawk. The Pixhawk/PX4 expects 3 two-position switches and a single 3-position switch for selecting your flight mode. The Taranis is overequipped with three-position switches, so I’ve set up a curve that treats positions 2 and 3 identically. To do this, go into Curves, pick a Curve (eg Curve 2), select 4 points, and set them at -100,-100;-50,-100;-1,100;100,100. Then you can pick Curve 2 for that input.

But back to the mixer. What’s it all about? The mixer is what actually produces the output values. In most cases for multirotors you just want to pass through your input channels, but you might want to do something fancier. For that Pixhawk setup, simply set channels 5-8 to correspond to inputs 5-8 where you’ve put your switches.

It seems logical, captain

Logical switches are kinda neat. Let’s say you have, as in our example, a 3 position switch with some 2 position switches cascaded from the output. In each combination we derive a logical state and it’d be nice to announce that, since the Taranis has audio playback.

I used the festival tts “text2wave” utility to generate some WAV files, and then used ffmpeg to resample them to mono 32kHz files. This is required for playback to work. Sounds simply drop into the SOUNDS/en/ folder. Note there’s an 8 character file name limit, though, not counting the .wav! Very long filenames won’t show up in the radio and will get truncated in settings.

In logical switches, we can take, for instance, L1, and set the function a<x. The OpenTX documentation lists the functions and what they do; this is a simple less than comparison.  We can point V1 at a channel in the mixer, for instance CH5, and set V2 to a constant like 0.  L1 being on now corresponds to the default (up) state of my 3-position switch being on.

This particular thing you can do by looking at the SA booleans, but logical switches have an AND switch function, too. This means we can, for all our two-position switches, only turn on our logical switches if the top-level switch is in the right position.

Special Functions are on the next tab. In here we can set actions for each switch or logical switch, like “Play track” to play some audio. I’ve got my radio set up to play the right bit of speech to tell me which flight mode I’m now in, eg “Full auto”, “RTLS”, “Manual”, “Position hold” etc.

This really is the tip of the iceberg – you could much more easily (in theory) do my Pixhawk flight mode announcement in Lua, as the radio supports scripting, but I’ve not had the time to figure out how to just yet! Combined with telemetry you can do automated warnings and announcements for altitude, speed, battery and more. It’s a very cool bit of kit and worth persevering with to get it set up just right for your use-case.

by James Harrison at December 21, 2014 09:41 PM

Hackaday » digital audio hacks

World’s First Smart Snowboard Changes Music According To Your Actions

Ever wanted a soundtrack to your life? For a couple of minutes at a time, Signal Snowboards creates that experience with a smart snowboard that varies your music depending on the tricks you perform on your way down the mountain.

The sign on the door says “School For Gifted Hackers”. Inside [Matt Davis] helped interface audio with an accelerometer – something he regularly does with all manner of hacked devices. At first the prototype was an iPhone mimicking the motions of a snowboarder the way fighter pilots describe dogfights with their hands. The audio engine that pulls those mostions to sound is open source and anyone is welcome to do their own tuning.

Once the audio was figured out the boys took it back to their shop and embedded the sensors into a new snowboard. The board is equipped with GPS, an accelerometer, a few rows of LEDs and a bluetooth board to connect to the phone app. It’s all powered by an on-board LiPo battery and a barrel jack out the side to charge it. Channels were cut by hand with a router then electronics sealed in place with epoxy. Not wanting to “just strap some Christmas lights onto a snowboard” the lighting is also connected to the sensors and is programmable.

See the video below of them making the board and taking it out for a test run on Bear Mountain.

Thanks [Ronald] for the tip.


Filed under: digital audio hacks

by Matt Freund at December 21, 2014 09:01 AM

December 20, 2014

OpenAV

OpenAV features in UbuntuUser Magazine! (+ more)

OpenAV features in UbuntuUser Magazine! (+ more)

OpenAV in Ubuntu User magazine!  Checkout the full interview here, and thanks again to Sam Tuke for doing the interview, and countless hours of editing. It was great to get to chat about all things linux-audio, and reading it now, it is easy to see the progress made since the interview was done. Amazing things in store for Linux audio! ArtyFX 1.3… Read more →

by harry at December 20, 2014 08:26 PM

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

EQ10Q V2 Beta6 is now available

Pere Rafols Soler has just released EQ10Q V2 Beta6. EQ10Q is a powerful and flexible parametric EQ. Alongside the download you will find a gate and a compressor plugin. With beta6 there is now also a new plugin called BassUp. You can read a full description about each plugin here.

New features in this release include -

by Conor at December 20, 2014 04:33 PM

GStreamer News

GStreamer Core, Plugins and RTSP server 1.4.5 stable release

The GStreamer team is pleased to announce a bugfix release of the stable 1.4 release series. The 1.4 release series is adding new features on top of the 1.2 series and is part of the API and ABI-stable 1.x release series of the GStreamer multimedia framework that contains new features. The 1.4.x bugfix releases only contain important bugfixes compared to 1.4.0.

Binaries for Android, iOS, Mac OS X and Windows are provided by the GStreamer project for this release. The Android binaries are now built with the r10c NDK and as such binary compatible again with all NDK and Android releases. Additionally now binaries for Android ARMv7 and Android X86 are provided. This binary release features the first 1.4 releases of GNonLin and the GStreamer Editing Services.

The 1.x series is a stable series targeted at end users. It is not API or ABI compatible with the 0.10.x series. It can, however, be installed in parallel with the 0.10.x series and will not affect an existing 0.10.x installation.

The stable 1.4.x release series is API and ABI compatible with 1.0.x and any other 1.x release series in the future. Compared to 1.0.x it contains some new features and more intrusive changes that were considered too risky as a bugfix.

Check out the release notes for GStreamer core, gst-plugins-base, gst-plugins-good, gst-plugins-ugly, gst-plugins-bad, gst-libav, or gst-rtsp-server, or download tarballs for gstreamer, gst-plugins-base, gst-plugins-good, gst-plugins-ugly, gst-plugins-bad, or gst-libav, or gst-rtsp-server.

Check the release announcement mail for details and the release notes above for a list of changes.

Also available are binaries for Android, iOS, Mac OS X and Windows.

December 20, 2014 04:00 PM

December 19, 2014

ardour

Nightly Builds Now Available

Thanks to the amazing hardwork of Robin Gareus and funding from Harrison Consoles, ardour.org now has nightly builds of the development version of Ardour available. Read more details below.

read more

by paul at December 19, 2014 03:27 PM

Sam Tuke » Audio

My Linux Audio interview in Ubuntu User

It was months in the making, finally reached news stands last month, and now it’s free to read online. That’s right, you can read my five page interview with Harry van Haaren on the Ubuntu User website. The printed copy looks much prettier however, and also includes a three page guide to using Harry’s suite […]

by samtuke at December 19, 2014 02:45 PM

December 18, 2014

Nothing Special

Easy(ish) Triple Boot on 2014 Macbook Pro

Nothing is easy. Or perhaps everything is. Regardless, here is how I did it, but first a little backstory:

I got a macbook pro 11,3 from work. I wanted a lenovo, but the boss wants me to do some iOS stuff eventually. Thats fine, cause I can install linux just as easily on whatever. Oh wait.. There are some caveats. Boot Camp seems to be a little picky. Just as well. MIS clowns set up boot camp so I had windows 7 and Yosemite working, but they told me I'm on my own for linux. It seems from the posts I've read about triple booting is that you have to plan it out from the get-go of partitioning, not just add it in as an afterthought. But I also found suggestions about wubi.



I've used wubi and didn't really understand what it did, but its actually perfect for setting up a triple boot system in my situation (where it's already dual boot and I want to tack on linux and ignore the other two). There is a lot of misunderstanding that wubi is abandoned and no longer supported bla bla. The real story is that the way wubi works doesn't play nicely with windows 8. Therefore if it doesn't work for everybody Ubuntu doesn't want to advertise it as an option. Its there, but they'd rather have everyone use the most robust method known: full install from the live cd/usb. Not that wubi is rickety or anything, but only works in certain situations (windows 7 or earlier). The reality is its on every desktop ISO downloaded, including latest versions (more on that later).

The way wubi works is important to note too (and its the reason that its perfect for this situation). Wubi creates a virtual disk inside the NTSC (windows) partition of the disk. So instead of dividing the hard drive space into two sections (one for linux, one for windows, and/or a third for OSX if triple boot) it doesn't create disk partitions at all,  just a disk file inside the existing windows partition. The windows bootloader is configured to open the windows partition then mount this file as another disk in whats called a loopback mode. This is distinctly contrasted to a virtualized environment where often a virtual disk is running on virtual hardware. You are using your actual machine, just your disk is kinda configured in a unique but clever way.

The main downside it sounds like is that you could have poor disk performance. It sounds like in extreme cases, VERY poor performance. Since this machine was intended for development its maxed out with 16GB ram, so I'm not even worrying about swap, and the 1TB hdd has plenty of space for all 3 OSes and its a fresh install so shouldn't be too fragmented. These are the best conditions for wubi. So far it seems to be working great. Install took a little trial and error though.

So I had to at least TRY to teach you something before giving you the recipe, but here goes:

  1. I had to install bootcamp drivers in windows. MIS should have done that but they're clowns. You'll have to learn that on your own. There are plenty of resources for those poor mac users. This required a boot into OSX.
  2. Boot into windows.
  3. Use the on screen keyboard in the accessibility options of the windows to be able to hit ctl+alt+delete to make up for the flaw that macbooks have no delete key (SERIOUSLY?) Also don't get me started on how I miss my lenovo trackpoints.
  4. I installed sharpkeys to remap the right alt to be a delete key so I could get around this in the future. I know sooner or later Cypress will make me boot into windoze.
  5. Download the Ubuntu desktop live CD ISO (I did the most recent LTS. I'm not in school any more, gone are the days where I had time to change everything every 6 months).
  6. In windows install something that will let you mount the ISO in a virtual cd drive. You could burn it to CD or make a live USB, but this was the quickest. I used WinCDEmu as it's open source.
  7. Mount the ISO and copy wubi.exe off of the ISO's contents and into whatever directory the ISO is actually in (i.e. Downloads).
  8. Unmount the ISO. This was not obvious to me and caused an error in my first attempt.
  9. Disable your wifi. This was not obvious to me and caused an error in my second attempt. This forces wubi to look around and find the ISO that is in the same folder rather than try to re-download another ISO.
  10. Run wubi.exe .
  11. Pick your install size, user name, all that. Not that it matters but I just did vanilla ubuntu since I was going to install i3 over the Unity DE anyway. Historically I always like to do it with xubuntu, but I digress.
  12. Hopefully I haven't forgotten any steps, but that should run and ask you to reboot. (I'd re-enable the wifi before you do reboot, or else you'll forget like I did and wonder why its broken next windows boot).
  13. The reboot should complete the install and get you into ubuntu.
  14. I believe the next time you reboot it will not work. For me it did not. Its due to a grub2 bug I understand. Follow the solutions in these two threads: 
    1. http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2218439&p=13094149#post13094149
    2. http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2217829&p=12996954#post12996954
  15. To roughly summarise the process, hit the e key to edit the grub config that will try to load ubuntu. Edit the line
    linux /boot/vmlinuz-3.13.0-24-generic root=UUID=bunchofhexidec loop=/ubuntu/disks/root.disk ro

    ro should be changed to rw. This will allow you to boot. The first post tells you to edit an auto-generated file. Thats silly. what happens when it gets auto-generated and again and overwrites your fix? It even says not to edit it in the header. Instead you need to make a similar change to the file that causes it to have that error and then generate those files again as described in the second link.
  16. Once that is sorted out you'll probably notice that the wifi is not working. You can either use an ethernet port adapter or a USB wifi card (or figure out another way) but get internet somehow and install bcmwl-kernel-source and it should start working (maybe after a logout. I don't remember).
  17. Another tweak you will need is that this screen has a rediculously high DPI so the default fonts are all teensy-tiny. The easiest workaround is just to lower the screen resolution in the displays setting of unity-command-center, but you can also edit the font sizes in that dialog and/or using unity-tweak-tool. I'm still ironing that out. Especially since my secondary monitors are still standard definition. xrandr --scale is my only hope. Or just lower the resolution.
  18. You might find that the touchpad click doesn't work as you expect. Try running the command:
    synclient ClickPad=0
    and see if you like it better. I sure do. Also enable two finger scrolling in the unity-control-center.
  19. Also, importantly, wubi only allows up to 30GB of virtual disk to be created. I wanted a lot more than that. So I booted off a USB live stick I had laying around and followed the instructions here to make it a more reasonable 200GB.
  20. Finally install i3-wm, vifm, eclipse, the kxstudio repos and everything else you love about linux.
So I love my macbook. Because its a linux box.

by Spencer (noreply@blogger.com) at December 18, 2014 04:14 PM

December 17, 2014

GStreamer News

Orc 0.4.23 bug-fix release

The GStreamer team announces another maintenance bug-fix release of liborc, the Optimized Inner Loop Runtime Compiler. Main changes since the previous release:

  • various improvements to the NEON backend to bring it closer to the SSE backend
  • add support for setting a custom backup function
  • preserve NEON/VFP registers across subroutines
  • fix 64 bit parameter loading on big-endian systems
  • improved implementations for various opcodes
  • various improvements and fixes to constants handling
  • avoid some undefined operations on signed integers
  • prefer user specific directories over global ones for intermediate files to prevent name collisions

Direct tarball download: orc-0.4.23.

December 17, 2014 10:30 AM

Scores of Beauty

Catching up with the Mutopia Project

One of the truly impressive parts of the broader LilyPond “ecosystem” is the Mutopia Project. It currently offers an astounding 1888 pieces of music for free download in LilyPond, PDF, and MIDI formats. Every single piece is in the public domain or licensed under a Creative Commons license. What’s even more amazing is that they were all typeset by volunteers. In this post I will discuss some recent progress in the Mutopia Project, and acknowledge the valuable work of the volunteers who contribute to it.

Updating Older Files

Over the years as LilyPond continues to improve with each new version, the files offered by the Mutopia Project get further and further behind the current version of LilyPond — unless they are updated. Since the project was begun before 1999 (not long after LilyPond herself was born in 1996) it’s no surprise that some of the files are for relatively ancient versions of LilyPond. Until recently there was even one file that went back to LilyPond version 1.4.7 (released in 2001)!

Back in January of 2014 Glen Larsen initiated an effort to update the oldest of the Mutopia Project files. At that point there were 15 files for LilyPond version 1.x.x and these were targeted for the first phase of the effort. Several volunteers stepped up to update these oldest (and most difficult to update) files, including Federico Bruni, Glen Larsen, Javier Ruiz-Alma, Francisco Vila, and Valentin Villenave. (Let me know if I’ve missed anyone!)

A second update in February tackled another 15 files — those in the collection that were at version 2.0.x. All of these updates were submitted in only 11 days, as Karsten Richter joined the ranks of the volunteers.

In September a third update took on the 28 files in the collection at version 2.1.x. Several more volunteers came on board, including myself (Paul Morris), Abel Cheung, Felix Janda, and Knute Snortum.

Recently a fourth update has begun that targets the 27 files at version 2.2.x.

These efforts are coordinated through the Mutopia Project’s mailing list and GitHub repository. All of the Mutopia Project’s files are now hosted on GitHub, and you can see the “milestones” for updates one, two, three, and the current update four.

If you think about it, it is pretty impressive that files this old can still be successfully updated (with help from convert-ly, of course). That kind of longevity is not common in the quickly evolving world of technology where today’s “shiny and new” quickly becomes tomorrow’s “old and obsolete.”

One of the main motivations behind these updates is to simplify the maintenance of the Mutopia Project. To quote from this wiki page on updating files: “As the Mutopia Project grows, so does the job of maintenance, and maintenance is easier if all the Mutopia files stay as current as possible. The goal is not to keep all Mutopia files at the current stable release version of Lilypond, the goal is to have our archive use as few Lilypond releases as possible.”

Some additional benefits include better quality engraving of the updated files — since LilyPond’s engraving has come a long way since these these earlier versions. And of course it’s a better experience for users when the files they encounter are for more recent versions of LilyPond. The older the file the greater the chance that there will be difficulties when they update it.

Adding More “Popular” Works

In addition to the work updating older files, Javier Ruiz-Alma has collaborated with the IMSLP (another online library that primarily provides PDF scans of sheet music), to identify “popular” pieces of music (i.e. those that are more sought-after) that are not yet available from the Mutopia Project. They identified the most downloaded works on the IMSLP, those that get over 1,000 downloads a month, and came up with a list of 12 of these that were not yet in the Mutopia collection. (Unfortunately the Mutopia Project does not currently have the infrastructure to track its own downloads.)

Javier then organized an effort to add these 12 pieces to the Mutopia collection, offering them in LilyPond, PDF, and MIDI formats (whereas on IMSLP they are typically only available as scanned PDFs). As Javier put it in an email to the Mutopia mailing list, the goal is “to continue increasing the value Mutopia offers to those who search our site for free music, and improve the chance they’ll find the music they’re looking for.”

The following volunteers have contributed to this ongoing effort: Joram Berger, Federico Bruni, Abel Cheung, Glen Larsen, Javier Ruiz-Alma, Knute Snortum, and Steve (@stevetnz). There is a milestone tracker on GitHub where you can see its current status.

New Mutopia Project Footer

The official Mutopia Project footer that appears in each piece of music was redesigned in the past year. Here’s an example of the previous version:

old-mutopia-tagline

And an example of the new version:

new-mutopia-tagline

The new version looks great and is quite an improvement!

Volunteering

There are various different ways to help out with LilyPond directly. Volunteering with the Mutopia Project is another way to support the health of the broader LilyPond “ecosystem.” Anyone who knows how to use LilyPond can contribute. If you think you might be interested, then check out the Mutopia Project wiki, and/or inquire on the mailing list.

Kudos to all of the Mutopia Project volunteers for their ongoing work maintaining and improving this valuable resource! And a special thanks to Chris Sawer who has been leading the project since 1999!

by Paul Morris at December 17, 2014 08:00 AM

Talk Unafraid

Going mobile – my quadcopter so far

So over the last year or two I’ve been intermittently doing stuff with unmanned aerial systems. Nothing for work, strictly hobbyist stuff, and strictly for fun, though with a serious goal in mind.

More or less every year now the village I live in floods. The degree to which it does so varies, as does the response from the council and locals. Last year we managed to get aerial photography from some friends with a light aircraft handy which was fascinating to see – we could start to see the bounds and patterns of the flooding in context. Trouble is, it took a while to arrange and we only got one set of pictures.

Wouldn’t it be nice to be able to get more pictures, faster? Here’s my story so far in the wonderful world of multirotors…

Right away I made my first mistake: I bought into the UAir kickstarter for my very own little quadcopter. The UAir kickstarter turned out to more or less be a scam (and the company disappeared, only to reappear months later in South Africa under a different name), delivering an unflyable vehicle, broken hardware, awful flight controllers and telemetry. The code, far from being state of the art, was atrocious, and lacked key features. The hardware turned out not to be well-designed, either. The metal frame was prone to bending, and mounting options were limited. The speed controllers could easily short themselves mid-flight and the motors were hard to source, used collet-type rotor clamps that in two cases detatched during flight and in one case snapped the motor shaft off on landing.

Having learned that expensive lesson I went about replacing parts until I had something flyable. My first iteration simply took the existing flight hardware, and replaced electronics; the speed controllers with JP 40A controllers, and the flight controller with a MultiWii – this got me flying, briefly. Then a motor failed mid-flight, flipping the quad and delivering it at some speed into a fencepost, breaking the frame entirely (and taking a chunk out of the post)

Old frame etc on the rightOld (bent) frame etc on the right, new frame base and landing gear on the left prior to assembly

For revision three, I decided it was time to retire the metal frame and replaced it with a clone of the DJI F450 glass fibre/plastic frame, adding a set of landing gear to provide some additional clearance to hang payloads. I also swapped the MultiWii for an OpenPilot CC3D, which cost about the same but had a massively nicer set of tools and much more actively developed code. The CC3D was the first flight controller I’d used to feature the STM32 series of microcontrollers, which are a huge improvement over the 8-bit Atmel based flight controllers I’d used previously. As well as having more room for complex code, the sensor filtering and fusion algorithms you can fit into these chips is clearly worlds ahead of things like the ATmega series.

CC3D on the quadCC3D on the new frame. 9X receiver on the right, Arduino for lights on the left. Foam for basic vibration isolation

The F450 frame has served me well so far. I replaced my Keda K20 motors with a set of 2217 880KV motors after a bearing failure on one of the K20s; the 880KV number is effectively a torque rating – these motors are decent mid-range lifters, and the quad can happily lift about 800g of payload in addition to its dry mass of about 1.5 kilos (including battery). It might carry more, but I’ve not tried yet.

Slung below the frame is a battery mount and vibration isolating gimbal mount, all hanging from a set of carbon fibre load tubes and both themselves carbon fibre. I tried several options for mounting cameras, computers and batteries before settling on this option for now. My first attempt was to build a battery housing which would hang from the load tubes and be vibration isolated, and then to mount the camera on that ‘clean’ section. This worked, but the balsa construction failed catastrophically in a ~300ft crash, and I opted for a more rigid approach. The crash was the first serious crash I’ve had – I flew nose-in and lost my bearings, tried to correct but failed and ended up cutting the motors when I couldn’t see it clearly. The tree actually cushioned the blow…

The view from the camera after the worst crash I've had, post-flyawayThe view from the camera after the worst crash I’ve had, after a flyaway – that’s a very deep lake and this was feet away!

Remarkably, all of my hardware was ready to fly again immediately, sans one chipped prop blade.

The broken balsa battery mountThe broken balsa battery mount with Raspberry Pi+Camera (inverted)

While I don’t yet have a gimbal – widely accepted as being a non-optional addition to any multirotor for smooth video or photography – I do have a camera in the form of a Raspberry Pi B+ and camera module, seen above. It’s not perfect, but it does work quite well. I have some Python code which handles locking off the white balance and exposure settings on startup to avoid the sky causing the camera to overcompensate, causing the ground to just appear as a dark blob.

I’m also trying to get this video multicast back down to a ground station, but that’s taking some time – I have an old camera bag with a Ubiquiti Bullet M2 access point and Mikrotik 750G router which the Pi will connect to if it can see it. Latency is a major issue for real-time feedback to help adjust flight; there looks to be a lower bound on that of around 100ms with the Pi’s video encoder etc.

Looking towards BablockhytheLooking towards Bablockhythe Same view two days laterSame view two days later after some heavy rain

I’m lucky to live in a rural area where flying is straightforward, from a legal compliance perspective – it’s easy to stay the required distances from people and buildings. I am (just) within the RAF Brize Norton CTR airspace so can’t exceed 400 feet in altitude but that’s really not an issue; I’m actually pretty certain I’m fine to fly higher given I’m flying a sub-7kg drone non-commercially, but I’ll be talking to Brize Norton to ask permission before I do so, just to be sure. It’s easy to see anything coming remotely close and get on the ground fast, so from a purely practical perspective it’s not an issue, but I’ve been making sure I comply with absolutely all of the CAA guidance and requirements throughout all this. I’m also a fully paid-up insurance-holding British Model Flying Association member – this gives me third party liability cover in the event of an accident.

workingLooking back towards home – I’m the little speck in the field Looking back across NorthmoorLooking back across Northmoor in cloudy weather – the row of houses in the middle of the shot is Griffiths Close

The only major downside to all of this is simply cost. It’s not an exaggeration to say that I have spent more on this project than I have on, say, my car, or my main computers. It’s incredibly fun – not just the camera side of things, but actually flying. Items like motors and speed controller are £30 a pop – so now you need four of everything and suddenly that’s £240. Batteries are £40, carbon fibre frame parts range from ~£25 to ~£200 depending on the part, simple flight controllers and radios are <£100, but are limited. Props may only be £5 a pair, but you get through plenty while learning! Then there’s all the ancillary bits and pieces you need – power step-down boards, battery connectors and power wiring, it all adds up.

I’ve done a lot of building my own stuff, too, like soldering up my own power distribution looms and so on; this is something you can avoid doing but it’s much more fun to do so if you ask me!

Current configurationCurrent payload/power configuration – note the rubber mounts holding the Pi/cam to help isolate it from vibration

My latest step is to upgrade the electronics on my quad, now I’ve gotten the actual flight hardware fairly well sorted. This involves replacing the CC3D with the Pixhawk flight controller, which is basically the most powerful flight control board out there (perhaps aside from DJI’s A2/Wookong boards, but neither of them are open source and both are viciously expensive). I’m also replacing my old Turnigy 9X radio with a Taranis X9D+ and X8R receiver combo, which gets me 16 channels of remote control and simple telemetry. The Pixhawk can make use of the MAVLink protocol for in-air control and telemetry, so I’ve got a set of 3DR 433MHz telemetry radios to do just that.

The main enhancement, though, is a GPS board for the Pixhawk to finally add “semi-autonomous” flight to the project. The goal of this next step is to get the quad to the point where it can fly itself, doing position hold and pre-programmed flight routes. I purposefully didn’t choose to do this from the outset so I could learn how to actually fly – I think I have a decent chance of being able to recover from an autopilot failure now. The Pixhawk/PX4 stack, based on the NuttX real-time operating system, provides a really great platform not only to use out of the box but to develop applications on, and to integrate with external computers. This opens all sorts of possibilities up!

Top viewTop view showing general layout of electronics

There’s still a lot to do in order to turn this quad into a serious platform for aerial photography. I’m going to mount a second Raspberry Pi (A+) pointing straight down with the NoIR camera to play around with vegetation analysis, and I still need to get a gimbal and a camera with a larger bit of glass on the front than the Pi camera for decent, stable photos! A first-person-video link would also be a huge bonus and help with orienting and flying the vehicle, but as with the GPS I’m holding off till I’ve had more practice. Still, even with this fairly simple rig I’m flying right now I can take decent photos and video, learn to fly properly and have a lot of fun. If you don’t mind bankrupting yourself, it’s a fantastic hobby.

by James Harrison at December 17, 2014 01:18 AM

December 16, 2014

Objective Wave

Hydrogen with multi-bank per instrument

The functionality of having multiple bank per instrument is now available in Hydrogen’s github:

http://github.com/hydrogen-music/hydrogen

In a nutshell, each instrument can have multiple set of layers and the mixer have additional strips for each bank.

Let’s imagine you have samples for direct and overhead takes of a drumkit, Hydrogen can handle that, the jack outputs per instrument will be separated and you can control in the mixer how much of the direct/overhead takes you want.

Hope you guys and girls get the chance to try it out!


by blablack at December 16, 2014 06:41 PM

December 15, 2014

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

14 ways to contribute to Hydrogen!

The Hydrogen developers have just put up an interesting post on the Hydrogen website, 14 ways to contribute to Hydrogen!

What pops into most peoples heads when they think about contributing towards a software project is coding and bug testing, but there are many other ways to contribute too, especially for end users.

Check out the full list of ways you can contribute to Hydrogen.

 

by Conor at December 15, 2014 10:51 AM

OpenAV

OpenAV: Fabla 2.0 – 9 days in!

OpenAV: Fabla 2.0 – 9 days in!

Its only been 9 days since the initial feature-request which triggered (excuse the pun), but checkout the Wiki! It is kept up to date with features as they are being completed, example? The “Pad Features”, they’re ~60% done! Review the features there, and if there’s something you’d like to add, just post on the wishlist. Code Thanks A lot of code has… Read more →

by harry at December 15, 2014 12:23 AM

December 13, 2014

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

Newsletter for December out now - Tutorials, news and survey

Our newsletter for December is now sent to our subscribers. If you have not yet subscribed, you can do that from our start page.

You can also read the latest issue online. In it you will find:

  • LMP's end of year survey
  • Third installment of 'LMP Asks', with Aurélien Leblond
  • New tutorial
  • New software release announcements

and more!

by admin at December 13, 2014 11:14 PM

OpenAV

Fabla 2.0 : Code and design underway!

Fabla 2.0 : Code and design underway!

A huge amount of progress to report for Fabla 2.0! With the structure of sound-engine designed, and diagrammed, the features of Fabla 2.0 are now set and the coding of the engine has begun. AVTK for the UI OpenAV user interfaces are known by their distinct look and feel: and we’re happy to announce that an all new AVTK is… Read more →

by harry at December 13, 2014 12:51 AM

December 11, 2014

Objective Wave

Libre Music Promotion – Interview

Because self-promotion never hurted anyone, here is an interview I did for the Libre Music Promotion website:
http://www.libremusicproduction.com/articles/lmp-asks-3-interview-aur%C3%A9lien-leblond

I actually cannot stress enough how good http://www.libremusicproduction.com is! The website contains lots of news on music production with free software, tutorials and (as just said) interviews.


by blablack at December 11, 2014 07:53 PM