planet.linuxaudio.org

October 17, 2019

rncbc.org

The QStuff* Autumn'19 Release

Hello there!

It's coming true: the old bunch of Qstuff*, QjackCtl, Qsynth, Qsampler, QXGEdit, QmidiCtl and QmidiNet, are all catching up and aligning to the magical version 0.6.0 :)

That's all pretty much and enough for now ;)...

 

QjackCtl - JACK Audio Connection Kit Qt GUI Interface

QjackCtl 0.6.0 (autumn'19) is out!

QjackCtl is a(n ageing yet modern, not so simple anymore) Qt application to control the JACK sound server, for the Linux Audio infrastructure.

Website:

https://qjackctl.sourceforge.io
http://qjackctl.sourceforge.net

Project page:

https://sourceforge.net/projects/qjackctl

Downloads:

https://sourceforge.net/projects/qjackctl/files

Git repos:

https://git.code.sf.net/p/qjackctl/code
https://github.com/rncbc/qjackctl.git
https://gitlab.com/rncbc/qjackctl.git
https://bitbucket.com/rncbc/qjackctl.git

Change-log:

  • Graph: avoid self-connecting over their own ports when client nodes are selected as a whole group; also try to match port-types in a orderly fashion when connecting multiple selected ports.
  • Changing current JACK buffer size from Setup dialog (cf. Settings / Frames/Period) may now take effect just immediately ;)
  • An 'Apply' button as been added to the Setup dialog; ask whether to restart the JACK audio server, if any settings are changed.
  • Added alternate yet non-official CMake build option.
  • Fix HiDPI display screen effective support (Qt >= 5.6).
  • Command line arguments (--start, --preset=[label] and --active-patchbay=[path]) are passed and take effect on the current singleton/unique application instance, when enabled and already running.
  • System-tray icon context menu has been refactored to be exactly the same as the main-window context menu that is re-instantiated on demand.
  • Make sure compiler flags comply to c++11 as standard.

 

Qsynth - A fluidsynth Qt GUI Interface

Qsynth 0.6.0 (autumn'19) is out!

Qsynth is a FluidSynth GUI front-end application written in C++ around the Qt framework using Qt Designer.

Website:

https://qsynth.sourceforge.io
http://qsynth.sourceforge.net

Project page:

https://sourceforge.net/projects/qsynth

Downloads:

https://sourceforge.net/projects/qsynth/files

Git repos:

https://git.code.sf.net/p/qsynth/code
https://github.com/rncbc/qsynth.git
https://gitlab.com/rncbc/qsynth.git
https://bitbucket.com/rncbc/qsynth.git

Change-log:

  • Updated the old yet non-official CMake build option.
  • Fix HiDPI display screen effective support (Qt >= 5.6).
  • System-tray icon context menu has been refactored to be exactly the same as the main-window context menu that is re-instantiated on demand.
  • Make sure compiler flags comply to c++11 as standard.

 

Qsampler - A LinuxSampler Qt GUI Interface

Qsampler 0.6.0 (autumn'19) is out!

Qsampler is a LinuxSampler GUI front-end application written in C++ around the Qt framework using Qt Designer.

Website:

https://qsampler.sourceforge.io
http://qsampler.sourceforge.net

Project page:

https://sourceforge.net/projects/qsampler

Downloads:

https://sourceforge.net/projects/qsampler/files

Git repos:

https://git.code.sf.net/p/qsampler/code
https://github.com/rncbc/qsampler.git
https://gitlab.com/rncbc/qsampler.git
https://bitbucket.com/rncbc/qsampler.git

Change-log:

  • Added alternate yet non-official CMake build option.
  • Fix HiDPI display screen effective support (Qt >= 5.6).
  • Make sure compiler flags comply to c++11 as standard.

 

QXGEdit - A Qt XG Editor

QXGEdit 0.6.0 (autumn'19) is out!

QXGEdit is a live XG instrument editor, specialized on editing MIDI System Exclusive files (.syx) for the Yamaha DB50XG and thus probably a baseline for many other XG devices.

Website:

https://qxgedit.sourceforge.io
http://qxgedit.sourceforge.net

Project page:

https://sourceforge.net/projects/qxgedit

Downloads:

https://sourceforge.net/projects/qxgedit/files

Git repos:

https://git.code.sf.net/p/qxgedit/code
https://github.com/rncbc/qxgedit.git
https://gitlab.com/rncbc/qxgedit.git
https://bitbucket.com/rncbc/qxgedit.git

Change-log:

  • Added alternate yet non-official CMake build option.
  • Fix HiDPI display screen effective support (Qt >= 5.6).
  • Refactored all singleton/unique application instance setup logic away from X11/Xcb hackery.
  • Make sure compiler flags comply to c++11 as standard.

 

QmidiCtl - A MIDI Remote Controller via UDP/IP Multicast

QmidiCtl 0.6.0 (autumn'19) is out!

QmidiCtl is a MIDI remote controller application that sends MIDI data over the network, using UDP/IP multicast. Inspired by multimidicast (https://llg.cubic.org/tools) and designed to be compatible with ipMIDI for Windows (https://nerds.de). QmidiCtl was long ago designed for the Maemo enabled handheld devices, namely the late Nokia N900 and promoted to the Maemo Package repositories. Nevertheless, QmidiCtl may still be found effective as a regular desktop application and recently as an Android application as well.

Website:

https://qmidictl.sourceforge.io
http://qmidictl.sourceforge.net

Project page:

https://sourceforge.net/projects/qmidictl

Downloads:

https://sourceforge.net/projects/qmidictl/files

Git repos:

https://git.code.sf.net/p/qmidictl/code
https://github.com/rncbc/qmidictl.git
https://gitlab.com/rncbc/qmidictl.git
https://bitbucket.com/rncbc/qmidictl.git

Change-log:

  • Populate automatically the network interface combo-box with detected interface names (after merge request by plcl aka. Pedro López-Cabanillas, while on qmidinet).
  • Complete rewrite of all the basic network interface code, while using the Qt5 framework as far as needed to support IPv4 and IPv6 seamless and interchangeably.
  • Added alternate yet non-official CMake build option.
  • Fix HiDPI display screen effective support (Qt >= 5.6).
  • Added left/right swipe gestures to navigate over mixer strip pages.
  • Make sure compiler flags comply to c++11 as standard.

 

QmidiNet - A MIDI Network Gateway via UDP/IP Multicast

QmidiNet 0.6.0 (autumn'19) is out!

QmidiNet is a MIDI network gateway application that sends and receives MIDI data (ALSA-MIDI and JACK-MIDI) over the network, using UDP/IP multicast. Inspired by multimidicast and designed to be compatible with ipMIDI for Windows.

Website:

https://qmidinet.sourceforge.io
http://qmidinet.sourceforge.net

Project page:

https://sourceforge.net/projects/qmidinet

Downloads:

https://sourceforge.net/projects/qmidinet/files

Git repos:

https://git.code.sf.net/p/qmidinet/code
https://github.com/rncbc/qmidinet.git
https://gitlab.com/rncbc/qmidinet.git
https://bitbucket.com/rncbc/qmidinet.git

Change-log:

  • Populate automatically the network interface combo-box with detected interface names (after merge request by plcl aka. Pedro López-Cabanillas, thanks).
  • Complete rewrite of all the basic network interface code, while using the Qt5 framework as far as needed to support IPv4 and IPv6 seamless and interchangeably.
  • Added alternate yet non-official CMake build option.
  • Fix HiDPI display screen effective support (Qt >= 5.6).
  • Make sure compiler flags comply to c++11 as standard.

 

License:

All of the Qstuff* are free, open-source Linux Audio software, distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL) version 2 or later.

Enjoy && Have fun!

by rncbc at October 17, 2019 06:00 PM

News – Ubuntu Studio

Ubuntu Studio 19.10 Released

The Ubuntu Studio team is pleased to announce the release of Ubuntu Studio 19.10, code-named “Eoan Ermine”. This marks Ubuntu Studio’s 26th release. This release is a regular release and as such, it is supported for 9 months. For those requiring longer-term support, we encourage you to install Ubuntu Studio 18.04 “Bionic Beaver” and add […]

by eeickmeyer at October 17, 2019 05:26 PM

digital audio hacks – Hackaday

Worried About Bats in your Belfry? A Tale of Two Bat Detectors

As somebody who loves technology and wildlife and also needs to develop an old farmhouse, going down the bat detector rabbit hole was a journey hard to resist. Bats are ideal animals for hackers to monitor as they emit ultrasonic frequencies from their mouths and noses to communicate with each other, detect their prey and navigate their way around obstacles such as trees — all done in pitch black darkness. On a slight downside, many species just love to make their homes in derelict buildings and, being protected here in the EU, developers need to make a rigorous survey to ensure as best as possible that there are no bats roosting in the site.

Perfect habitat for bats.

Obviously, the authorities require a professional independent survey, but there’s still plenty of opportunity for hacker participation by performing a ‘pre-survey’. Finding bat roosts with DIY detectors will tell us immediately if there is a problem, and give us a head start on rethinking our plans.

As can be expected, bat detectors come in all shapes and sizes, using various electrickery techniques to make them cheaper to build or easier to use. There are four different techniques most popularly used in bat detectors.

 

  1. Heterodyne: rather like tuning a radio, pitch is reduced without slowing the call down.
  2. Time expansion: chunks of data are slowed down to human audible frequencies.
  3. Frequency division: uses a digital counter IC to divide the frequency down in real time.
  4. Full spectrum: the full acoustic spectrum is recorded as a wav file.

Fortunately, recent advances in technology have now enabled manufacturers to produce relatively cheap full spectrum devices, which give the best resolution and the best chances of identifying the actual bat species.

DIY bat detectors tend to be of the frequency division type and are great for helping spot bats emerging from buildings. An audible noise from a speaker or headphones can prompt us to confirm that the fleeting black shape that we glimpsed was actually a bat and not a moth in the foreground. I used one of these detectors in conjunction with a video recorder to confirm that a bat was indeed NOT exiting from an old chimney pot. Phew!

The Technology

A great example of open source collaboration and iteration in action, the Ardubat was first conceived by Frank Pliquett and then expanded on by Tony Messina and more recently, simplified by Service Kring (PDF).

The Ardubat is a frequency division detector based on a TI CD4024 chip, fed by two LM386 amps. Bat detections are sent to an SD card which can be analysed afterwards to try and get some idea of the species. However, since this circuit works by pre-distorting the analog signal into a digital one and then dividing down, none of the amplitude information makes it through.

BAT DETECTOR 2015, simplified version of Ardubat developed by Service Kring.

The Bat Detector 2015 is again based on the CD4024, but uses a compact four channel amp, the TL074CNE4. Three of the channels feed the frequency divider chip and the fourth is a headphone amplifier. It’s a very neat design and the signal LED is fed directly from the CD4024. It comes as a complete DIY soldering kit for about $10 including postage. Yes …. $10 !!!

One of the biggest limitations with these detectors is the ultrasonic sensors themselves, which typically have a frequency response similar to the curve shown here. More recently, ultra-wide range MEMS SMT microphones have been released by Knowles, which work well right up to 125,000 Hz and beyond! Some bats, most notably the Lesser Horseshoe, can emit calls of up to 115,000 Hz. However, these older style sensors are incredibly good at detecting about 90% of the bats found here in the UK and are much more sensitive than heterodyne detectors.

 

The ‘professional’ option that I chose was the UltraMic384 by Dodotronics , which uses the Knowles electret FG23629 microphone with a 32-bit integrated ARM Cortex M4 microcontroller, capabable of recording up to 192,000 Hz in the audio spectrum. There are also some good DIY Hacker options such as the Audio Injector Ultra 2 for the Raspberry Pi, which can record at up to 96,000 Hz — but this is not quite good enough for all bats. Be aware that sampling rate is twice the audio frequency which can be quite confusing. An UltraMic sampling at 384 KB/s will record at 192 KHz.

These types of Full Spectrum devices can produce high resolution sonograms, or spectrograms using Audacity software. This is very helpful for wildlife enthusiasts who want to know what the actual bats species is, although even with the best tech, it’s still sometimes very difficult or impossible to determine species, especially within the Myotis genus.

So now we are fully equipped to check for bats in the derelict building using the DIY detector in conjunction with a video camera and a few pairs of human eyeballs. The full spectrum detector will be set to record right through the night and be used to check if there’s any activity we might have missed and tell us at the very least what genus the bats are.

All we need now is some Machine Learning to automatically identify the species. ML is a new frontier for bat detection, but nobody has yet produced a reliable system due to the similarity in the calls of different species. We know neural networks are being applied to recognize elephant vocalizations and the concept should be applicable here. A future project for an intrepid hacker? As for the Ardubat – it’s crying out for a better microphone, if not the expensive FG23629 then the 50 cent Knowles SMT SPU0410LR5H, which also has a great frequency response curve.

[Main image: Myotis bechsteinii by Dietmar Nill CC-BY-SA 2.5]

by Pat Whetman at October 17, 2019 05:01 PM

The Linux-audio-announce Archives

[LAA] The QStuff* Autumn'19 Release

Hello there!

It's coming true: the old bunch of Qstuff*, QjackCtl [1], Qsynth [2],
Qsampler [3], QXGEdit [4], QmidiCtl [5] and QmidiNet [6], are all
catching up and aligning to the magical version 0.6.0 :)

That's all pretty much and enough for now ;)...


** QjackCtl - JACK Audio Connection Kit Qt GUI Interface [1] **

  QjackCtl 0.6.0 (autumn'19) is out!

QjackCtl is a(n ageing yet modern, not so 'simple' anymore) Qt [7]
application to control the JACK [8] sound server, for the Linux Audio
[12] infrastructure.

Website:
  https://qjackctl.sourceforge.io
  http://qjackctl.sourceforge.net

Project page:
  https://sourceforge.net/projects/qjackctl

Downloads:
  https://sourceforge.net/projects/qjackctl/files
- source tarball:
  https://download.sf.net/qjackctl/qjackctl-0.6.0.tar.gz
- source package:
  https://download.sf.net/qjackctl/qjackctl-0.6.0-39.rncbc.suse.src.rpm
- binary package:
  https://download.sf.net/qjackctl/qjackctl-0.6.0-39.rncbc.suse.x86_64.rpm
- AppImage [20] package:
  https://download.sf.net/qjackctl/qjackctl-0.6.0-39.x86_64.AppImage

Git repos:
  https://git.code.sf.net/p/qjackctl/code
  https://github.com/rncbc/qjackctl.git
  https://gitlab.com/rncbc/qjackctl.git
  https://bitbucket.com/rncbc/qjackctl.git

Change-log:
- Graph: avoid self-connecting over their own ports when client nodes
are selected as a whole group; also try to match port-types in a orderly
fashion when connecting multiple selected ports.
- Changing current JACK buffer size from Setup dialog (cf. Settings /
Frames/Period) may now take effect just immediately ;)
- An 'Apply' button as been added to the Setup dialog; ask whether to
restart the JACK audio server, if any settings are changed.
- Added alternate yet non-official CMake build option.
- Fix HiDPI display screen effective support (Qt >= 5.6).
- Command line arguments (--start, --preset=[label] and
--active-patchbay=[path]) are passed and take effect on the current
singleton/unique application instance, when enabled and already running.
- System-tray icon context menu has been refactored to be exactly the
same as the main-window context menu that is re-instantiated on demand.
- Make sure compiler flags comply to c++11 as standard.


** Qsynth - A fluidsynth Qt GUI Interface [2] **

  Qsynth 0.6.0 (autumn'19) is out!

Qsynth is a FluidSynth [10] GUI front-end application written in C++
around the Qt framework [7] using Qt Designer.

Website:
  https://qsynth.sourceforge.io
  http://qsynth.sourceforge.net

Project page:
  https://sourceforge.net/projects/qsynth

Downloads:
  https://sourceforge.net/projects/qsynth/files
- source tarball:
  https://download.sf.net/qsynth/qsynth-0.6.0.tar.gz
- source package:
  https://download.sf.net/qsynth/qsynth-0.6.0-19.rncbc.suse.src.rpm
- binary package:
  https://download.sf.net/qsynth/qsynth-0.6.0-19.rncbc.suse.x86_64.rpm
- AppImage [20] package:
  https://download.sf.net/qsynth/qsynth-0.6.0-19.x86_64.AppImage

Git repos:
  https://git.code.sf.net/p/qsynth/code
  https://github.com/rncbc/qsynth.git
  https://gitlab.com/rncbc/qsynth.git
  https://bitbucket.com/rncbc/qsynth.git

Change-log:
- Updated the old yet non-official CMake build option.
- Fix HiDPI display screen effective support (Qt >= 5.6).
- System-tray icon context menu has been refactored to be exactly the
same as the main-window context menu that is re-instantiated on demand.
- Make sure compiler flags comply to c++11 as standard.


** Qsampler - A LinuxSampler Qt GUI Interface [3] **

  Qsampler 0.6.0 (autumn'19) is out!

Qsampler is a LinuxSampler [11] GUI front-end application written in C++
around the Qt framework [7] using Qt Designer.

Website:
  https://qsampler.sourceforge.io
  http://qsampler.sourceforge.net

Project page:
  https://sourceforge.net/projects/qsampler

Downloads:
  https://sourceforge.net/projects/qsampler/files
- source tarballs:
  https://download.sf.net/qsampler/qsampler-0.6.0.tar.gz
- source package:
  https://download.sf.net/qsampler/qsampler-0.6.0-31.rncbc.suse.src.rpm
- binary package:
  https://download.sf.net/qsampler/qsampler-0.6.0-31.rncbc.suse.x86_64.rpm
- AppImage [20] package:
  https://download.sf.net/qsampler/qsampler-0.6.0-31.x86_64.AppImage

Git repos:
  https://git.code.sf.net/p/qsampler/code
  https://github.com/rncbc/qsampler.git
  https://gitlab.com/rncbc/qsampler.git
  https://bitbucket.com/rncbc/qsampler.git

Change-log:
- Added alternate yet non-official CMake build option.
- Fix HiDPI display screen effective support (Qt >= 5.6).
- Make sure compiler flags comply to c++11 as standard.


** QXGEdit - A Qt XG Editor [4] **

  QXGEdit 0.6.0 (autumn'19) is out!

QXGEdit is a live XG instrument editor, specialized on editing MIDI
System Exclusive files (.syx) for the Yamaha DB50XG [14] and thus
probably a baseline for many other XG devices.

Website:
  https://qxgedit.sourceforge.io
  http://qxgedit.sourceforge.net

Project page:
  https://sourceforge.net/projects/qxgedit

Downloads:
  https://sourceforge.net/projects/qxgedit/files
- source tarball:
  https://download.sf.net/qxgedit/qxgedit-0.6.0.tar.gz
- source package:
  https://download.sf.net/qxgedit/qxgedit-0.6.0-19.rncbc.suse.src.rpm
- binary package:
  https://download.sf.net/qxgedit/qxgedit-0.6.0-19.rncbc.suse.x86_64.rpm
- AppImage [20] package:
  https://download.sf.net/qxgedit/qxgedit-0.6.0-19.x86_64.AppImage

Git repos:
  https://git.code.sf.net/p/qxgedit/code
  https://github.com/rncbc/qxgedit.git
  https://gitlab.com/rncbc/qxgedit.git
  https://bitbucket.com/rncbc/qxgedit.git

Change-log:
- Added alternate yet non-official CMake build option.
- Fix HiDPI display screen effective support (Qt >= 5.6).
- Refactored all singleton/unique application instance setup logic away
from X11/Xcb hackery.
- Make sure compiler flags comply to c++11 as standard.


** QmidiCtl - A MIDI Remote Controller via UDP/IP Multicast [5] **

  QmidiCtl 0.6.0 (autumn'19) is out!

QmidiCtl [5] is a MIDI remote controller application that sends MIDI
data over the network, using UDP/IP multicast. Inspired by multimidicast
[15] and designed to be compatible with ipMIDI [15] for Windows.
QmidiCtl [5] was long ago designed for the Maemo [17] enabled handheld
devices, namely the late Nokia N900 [18] and promoted to the Maemo
Package [18] repositories. Nevertheless, QmidiCtl [5] may still be found
effective as a regular desktop application and recently as an Android
application as well.

Website:
  https://qmidictl.sourceforge.io
  http://qmidictl.sourceforge.net

Project page:
  https://sourceforge.net/projects/qmidictl

Downloads:
  https://sourceforge.net/projects/qmidictl/files
- source tarball:
  https://download.sf.net/qmidictl/qmidictl-0.6.0.tar.gz
- source package:
  https://download.sf.net/qmidictl/qmidictl-0.6.0-19.rncbc.suse.src.rpm
- binary package:
  https://download.sf.net/qmidictl/qmidictl-0.6.0-19.rncbc.suse.x86_64.rpm
- AppImage [20] package:
  https://download.sf.net/qmidictl/qmidictl-0.6.0-19.x86_64.AppImage
- Android packages:
  https://download.sf.net/qmidictl/qmidictl-0.6.0-19.armeabi-v7a.apk
  https://download.sf.net/qmidictl/qmidictl-0.6.0-19.arm64-v8a.apk
  https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=org.rncbc.qmidictl

Git repos:
  https://git.code.sf.net/p/qmidictl/code
  https://github.com/rncbc/qmidictl.git
  https://gitlab.com/rncbc/qmidictl.git
  https://bitbucket.com/rncbc/qmidictl.git

Change-log:
- Populate automatically the network interface combo-box with detected
interface names (after merge request by plcl aka. Pedro
Lpez-Cabanillas, while on qmidinet).
- Complete rewrite of all the basic network interface code, while using
the Qt5 framework as far as needed to support IPv4 and IPv6 seamless and
interchangeably.
- Added alternate yet non-official CMake build option.
- Fix HiDPI display screen effective support (Qt >= 5.6).
- Added left/right swipe gestures to navigate over mixer strip pages.
- Make sure compiler flags comply to c++11 as standard.


** QmidiNet - A MIDI Network Gateway via UDP/IP Multicast [6] **

  QmidiNet 0.6.0 (autumn'19) is out!

QmidiNet is a MIDI network gateway application that sends and receives
MIDI data (ALSA-MIDI [9] and JACK-MIDI [8]) over the network, using
UDP/IP multicast. Inspired by multimidicast [15] and designed to be
compatible with ipMIDI [16] for Windows.

Website:
  https://qmidinet.sourceforge.io
  http://qmidinet.sourceforge.net

Project page:
  https://sourceforge.net/projects/qmidinet

Downloads:
  https://sourceforge.net/projects/qmidinet/files
- source tarball:
  https://download.sf.net/qmidinet/qmidinet-0.6.0.tar.gz
- source package:
  https://download.sf.net/qmidinet/qmidinet-0.6.0-19.rncbc.suse.src.rpm
- binary package:
  https://download.sf.net/qmidinet/qmidinet-0.6.0-19.rncbc.suse.x86_64.rpm
- AppImage [20] package:
  https://download.sf.net/qmidinet/qmidinet-0.6.0-19.x86_64.AppImage

Git repos:
  https://git.code.sf.net/p/qmidinet/code
  https://github.com/rncbc/qmidinet.git
  https://gitlab.com/rncbc/qmidinet.git
  https://bitbucket.com/rncbc/qmidinet.git

Change-log:
- Populate automatically the network interface combo-box with detected
interface names (after merge request by plcl aka. Pedro
Lpez-Cabanillas, thanks).
- Complete rewrite of all the basic network interface code, while using
the Qt5 framework as far as needed to support IPv4 and IPv6 seamless and
interchangeably.
- Added alternate yet non-official CMake build option.
- Fix HiDPI display screen effective support (Qt >= 5.6).
- Make sure compiler flags comply to c++11 as standard.


License:
  All of the Qstuff* are free, open-source Linux Audio [11] software,
distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL)
version 2 or later [12].


References:

 [1] QjackCtl - A JACK Audio Connection Kit Qt GUI Interface
     https://qjackctl.sourceforge.io

 [2] Qsynth - A fluidsynth Qt GUI Interface
     https://qsynth.sourceforge.io

 [3] Qsampler - A LinuxSampler Qt GUI Interface
     https://qsampler.sourceforge.io

 [4] QXGEdit - A Qt XG Editor
     https://qxgedit.sourceforge.io

 [5] QmidiCtl - A MIDI Remote Controller via UDP/IP Multicast
     https://qmidictl.sourceforge.io

 [6] QmidiNet - A MIDI Network Gateway via UDP/IP Multicast
     https://qmidinet.sourceforge.io

 [7] Qt framework, C++ class library and tools for
     cross-platform application and UI development
     https://qt.io/

 [8] JACK Audio Connection Kit
     http://jackaudio.org

 [9] ALSA, Advanced Linux Sound Architecture
     https://www.alsa-project.org/

[10] FluidSynth - A SoundFont Synthesizer
     A real-time software synthesizer based on SoundFont 2 specifications
     https://www.fluidsynth.org

[11] LinuxSampler - The Linux Sampler Project
     A modular, streaming capable, realtime audio sampler
     https://www.linuxsampler.org

[12] Linux Audio consortium of libre software for audio-related work
     https://linuxaudio.org

[13] GPL - GNU General Public License
     https://www.gnu.org/copyleft/gpl.html

[14] Yamaha DB50XG
     http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/1996_articles/may96/yamahadb50xg.html

[15] multimidicast - sends and receives MIDI from ALSA sequencers over
network
     https://llg.cubic.org/tools/multimidicast

[16] ipMIDI - MIDI over Ethernet ports - send MIDI over your LAN
     https://nerds.de

[17] Maemo.org - Home of the Maemo community
     https://www.maemo.org

[18] Maemo.org Wiki - Nokia N900
     https://wiki.maemo.org/Nokia_N900

[19] Maemo.org - Downloads: QmidiCtl
     https://maemo.org/downloads/product/Maemo5/qmidictl

[20] AppImage, Linux apps that run anywhere
     https://appimage.org/


See also:
  https://www.rncbc.org/drupal/node/2045


Enjoy && Have fun!
--
rncbc aka Rui Nuno Capela

by rncbc at rncbc.org (Rui Nuno Capela) at October 17, 2019 02:21 PM

October 16, 2019

blog4

essay "Body Interfaces - Becoming Environment"

Tina Mariane Krogh Madsens essay "Body Interfaces - Becoming Environment" is featured in the hertech issue of Women Eco Artist Dialog, guest edited by Dr. Praba Pilar.

by herrsteiner (noreply@blogger.com) at October 16, 2019 07:02 PM

October 15, 2019

The Linux-audio-announce Archives

[LAA] DrumGizmo 0.9.18 released

DrumGizmo 0.9.18 Released!

DrumGizmo is an open source, multichannel, multilayered, cross-platform
drum plugin and stand-alone application. It enables you to compose drums
in midi and mix them with a multichannel approach. It is comparable to
that of mixing a real drumkit that has been recorded with a multimic setup.

This release is primarily a bugfix release but a few new features also
managed to sneak in.

Highlights:
 * Sample selection algorithm now behaves a lot better when using a
   small sample set.
 * Error reporting has been drastically improved when loading
   drum-kits.
 * Sample normalization option has been added.

As usual read the detailed description of all the new shiny features,
including some audio samples [1].

And now, without further ado, go grab 0.9.18!!! [2]

[1]: https://drumgizmo.org/wiki/doku.php?id=changelog:drumgizmo-0.9.18
[2]: http://www.drumgizmo.org/wiki/doku.php?id=getting_drumgizmo

by deva at aasimon.org (Bent Bisballe Nyeng) at October 15, 2019 07:22 PM

KXStudio News

KXStudio Monthly Report (October 2019)

Hello all, today is October 15th, a Linux/Libre-Audio release day.
I do not have anything to actually release (that is ready anyway), so I thought to instead start something new.

Every month, starting with this one, we will have a monthly report regarding the latest stuff in KXStudio.
This will involve new releases, package updates to its repositories, important bug-fixes and short-term plans.
So let's begin...

First of all, in case you somehow missed it, a new JACK2 release is here!
This finally brings meta-data support into JACK2. More information about meta-data in JACK can be found here.

On the repositories, "helm" package had an issue where the plugin could not find its own presets.
(This was caused due to KXStudio repositories going ahead on renaming "helm" to "Helm" as the former already exists)

ZynAddSubFX got (re-)added, using its nice and fancy Zyn-Fusion UI.
In the old repositories there was "zynaddsubfx" for old UI, and "zynaddsubfx-git" for the new one.
The "git" package is gone, only "zynaddsubfx" is there now and it has the new UI. +1 for progress!

x42-plugins got updated to 20191013 release.

Fluajho, Patroneo and Vico were added. (nice simple tools from Nils Hilbricht)
These last ones were tricky since they use python libraries.
In order to make it a generic package I resorted to cxfreeze which makes it run independent of the system python.

Coming soon is Carla 2.1-beta1.
The actual software is ready for the beta1 release, but setting up the infrastructure for an updated Qt5 build is taking longer than expected.
The current 2.0 builds use quite an old Qt version: Qt5.5 on macOS, Qt4(!) on Linux, which I do not accept for new releases going forward.
Windows builds are ready to go though, you can find test binaries on Carla's github.
Once I finish setting up the builds for Linux and macOS, I will make the announcement. Very likely in mid-November.

Finally, Sonoj is coming!
Sonoj is an annual event/convention in Cologne, Germany, about music production with free and open source software.
It features demonstrations, talks and hands-on workshops.
You can meet like-minded people, learn insider knowledge and tricks, participate in their one-hour production challenge!
It is only a few days from now, so please get ready! :)
I will be doing a talk in Sonoj about the past, present and future of JACK.
So please come and say hi, registration is free!

by falkTX at October 15, 2019 11:47 AM

October 14, 2019

GStreamer News

GStreamer Conference 2019: Full Schedule, Talks Abstracts and Speakers Biographies now available

The GStreamer Conference team is pleased to announce that the full conference schedule including talk abstracts and speaker biographies is now available for this year's lineup of talks and speakers, covering again an exciting range of topics!

The GStreamer Conference 2019 will take place on 31 October - 1 November 2019 in Lyon, France just after the Embedded Linux Conference Europe (ELCE).

Details about the conference and how to register can be found on the conference website.

This year's topics and speakers:

Lightning Talks:

  • Raising the Importance of the V4L2 plugin and Challenges
    Nicolas Dufresne, Collabora
  • WebKit-powered HTML overlays in your pipeline with GstWPE
    Philippe Normand, Igalia
  • Detect a metal can using GStreamer/OpenFoodFacts
    Stéphane Cerveau, Collabora
  • A new GStreamer RTSP Server
    Sebastian Dröge, Centricular
  • A brand new documentation infrastructure for the GStreamer framework
    Thibault Saunier, Igalia
  • GStreamer on Windows: Everything New
    Nirbheek Chauhan, Centricular
  • An Improved Latency Tracer
    Nicolas Dufresne, Collabora
  • Using Bots to Improve the Gitlab Workflow
    Jordan Petridis, Centricular
  • GNOME Radio
    Ole Aamot, GNOME
  • SCTE-35 support in GStreamer
    Edward Hervey, Centricular
  • Closed captions, AFD, BAR
    Aaron Boxer, Collabora
  • ...and more to come
  • ...
  • Submit your lightning talk now!

Many thanks to our sponsors, Collabora, Pexip, Igalia, Fluendo, Centricular, Facebook and Zeiss, without whom the conference would not be possible in this form. And to Ubicast who will be recording the talks again.

Considering becoming a sponsor? Please check out our sponsor brief.

We hope to see you all in Lyon in October! Don't forget to register!

October 14, 2019 06:00 PM

October 12, 2019

rncbc.org

Qtractor 0.9.10 - An Autumn'19 Release


Wholly greetings,

Without any further delay, here it goes:

Qtractor 0.9.10 (autumn'19) is now released!

The shortest and maybe TL;DR change-log for this northern Autumn'19 release goes like this:

  • Fixed the potential crash-effect in switching MIDI output buses on tracks that are set to show audio output monitoring meters.
  • Fixed initial session tempo override when importing a standard MIDI file (as reported on issue #230).
  • An alternate time-signature/meter option is being served to the MIDI clip editor (aka. piano-roll) and allowing for some poly-rhythm/meter scenarios on a per MIDI clip basis.
  • Fixed MIDI "overdub" recording on offset clips.
  • MIDI bank and program settings now propagating to all MIDI track's clips resp.
  • Fixed MIDI file format default setting other than SMF Format 0.
  • Escape key may now be used to reset time and tempo/time-signature spin-box controls.
  • Play-head time and tempo/time-signature controls are now featured in MIDI clip editor toolbars (aka. piano-roll); time display format is also separated from the tracks main application view and defaults to BBT as being most convenient.
  • All items in the MIDI clip editor's event list are now enabled, selectable and editable, no matter the filter settings for the event views.
  • Added alternate yet non-official CMake build option.
  • Improved MIDI clip editor (aka. piano-roll) position and size persistence across session state.
  • Fix HiDPI display screen effective support (Qt >= 5.6).
  • Mixer, Connections and MIDI clip editor top-level windows shall have no parent, unless when set as always-on-top tool windows. (REGRESSION)
  • Make sure compiler flags comply to c++11 as standard.

Description:

Qtractor is an audio/MIDI multi-track sequencer application written in C++ with the Qt framework. Target platform is Linux, where the Jack Audio Connection Kit (JACK) for audio and the Advanced Linux Sound Architecture (ALSA) for MIDI are the main infrastructures to evolve as a fairly-featured Linux desktop audio workstation GUI, specially dedicated to the personal home-studio.

Website:

http://qtractor.org
https://qtractor.sourceforge.io
http://qtractor.sourceforge.net

Project page:

https://sourceforge.net/projects/qtractor

Downloads:

https://sourceforge.net/projects/qtractor/files

Git repos:

https://git.code.sf.net/p/qtractor/code
https://github.com/rncbc/qtractor.git
https://gitlab.com/rncbc/qtractor.git
https://bitbucket.org/rncbc/qtractor.git

Wiki (help still wanted!):

https://sourceforge.net/p/qtractor/wiki/

License:

Qtractor is free, open-source Linux Audio software, distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL) version 2 or later.

Enjoy && Share the fun.

Donate to rncbc.org

by rncbc at October 12, 2019 11:00 AM

October 11, 2019

Linux – CDM Create Digital Music

Quick! This ffmpeg cheat sheet solves your video, audio conversion needs, for free

Video, audio, convert, extract – once, these tasks were easy with QuickTime Pro, but now it’s gone. ffmpeg to the rescue – any OS, no money required.

It’s Friday, some deadlines (or the weekend) are looming, so seems as good a time as any to share this.

ffmpeg is a free, powerful tool for Mac, Windows, and Linux, with near magical abilities to convert audio and video in all sorts of ways. Even though it’s open source software with a lineage back to the year 2000, it very often bests commercial tools. It does more, better, and faster in a silly number of cases.

There’s just one problem: getting it to solve a particular task often involves knowing a particular command line invocation. You could download a graphical front end, but odds are that’ll just slow you down. So in-the-know media folks invariably make collections of little code bits they find useful.

Coder Jean-Baptiste Jung has saved you the trouble, with a cheat sheet of all the most useful code. And these bear striking resemblance to some of the stuff you used to be able to do in QuickTime Pro before Apple killed it.

19 FFmpeg Commands For All Needs [CatsWhoCode]

And on GitHub: https://gist.github.com/protrolium/e0dbd4bb0f1a396fcb55

There are some particularly handy utilities there involving audio, which is where tools like Adobe’s subscription-only commercial options often fail. (Not to mention Adobe is proving it will cut off some localities based on politics – greetings, Venezuelan readers.)

It’s great stuff. But if you see something missing, put it here, and we’ll make our own little CDM guide.

More invaluable cheat sheets

We have a winner:

The above is great for a browse, but with everything covered and an interactive guide, you can’t beat this:

https://amiaopensource.github.io/ffmprovisr/ – by https://amianet.org/

Thanks to reader Jim Bell for the tip!

One alternative resource: for community-sourced command line recipes, check commandlinefu, which has a bunch of ffmpeg-related ones (and community up-voting):

https://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/matching/ffmpeg/ZmZtcGVn/sort-by-votes?fbclid=IwAR0TYuZZJknGnA2ro2c-yUI6weY8aZZO8yBrtls_RtRXs8rIz1cizyER7wA

Thanks to reader Lenny Mastrototaro for the tip.

Wait, wait, there’s more!

If you’re working with audio, sox – also free and open source and command line – covers some of the areas ffmpeg misses. Thanks to comments for the reminder; I use this all the time.

http://sox.sourceforge.net/

It also works on Mac, Windows, and Linux – meaning you only need one tool. An in fact, someone has done a cheat sheet for it, too:

https://github.com/chubin/cheat.sheets/blob/master/sheets/sox

A three-platform alternative to ffmpeg is MP4Box. I’d have to do a precise breakdown to work out which capabilities are specific to each MP4Box and ffmpeg, but since they’re both free, you can install them side by side and be ready for any situation. (It might even be worth keeping these on a USB key for emergencies.)

MP4Box isn’t normally downloaded separately but as part of the GPAC open media framework:

Now, they have mercifully integrated all their recipes directly into the documentation, so you don’t need a separate cheat sheet:

Why not use a GUI?

It seems I’m getting this question a lot. I’m not anti-GUI or some kind of command line ninja by any stretch of the imagination. But a GUI causes four problems:

Functionality. The GUI front ends for tools like ffmpeg don’t always cover its full set of features, and they may not be as up to date as the direct ffmpeg build (since they’re maintained separately and unofficially).

Portability. Some of the GUIs are not cross-platform. With the command line, a single workflow works on every OS. And you can even use them on a machine that doesn’t have a windowing environment loaded. Front ends also are more likely to encounter OS version conflicts than command lines.

Scriptability. Command line tools are almost always more easy to script and automate – and again, I’m no ninja; this stuff is sort of Google/DuckDuckGo/StackExchange-able in a few minutes.

Speed. Because of the nature of transcoding, it may well be easier to copy-paste a solution from above than it is to learn how each GUI works and where it has hidden the feature you need. Again, I’m not anti-GUI, but this is a pretty particular use case that really fits the command line. Literally, I bet you could have solved your problem and transcoded in the time it took you to read this section.

There’s just one tool I recommend for cross-platform GUI operation, and that’s the excellent Handbrake. (Some mishaps with VLC have proven to me that it’s a decent player, but not a great transcoder/utility.) Shutter Encoder is new to me, but it has one major advantage as a GUI – it has some previewing capability. Mac/Windows only, though.

More tips? Keep them coming.

The post Quick! This ffmpeg cheat sheet solves your video, audio conversion needs, for free appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

by Peter Kirn at October 11, 2019 06:33 PM

October 07, 2019

digital audio hacks – Hackaday

Make “Wireless” Earbuds Truly Wireless

[Don] bought some off-brand Bluetooth earbuds online that actually sound pretty good. But while it’s true that they don’t require wires for listening to tunes, the little storage/charging box they sleep in definitely has a micro USB port around back. Ergo, they are not truly wireless. So [Don] took it upon himself to finish what the manufacturer started. Because it’s 2019, and words have meaning.

Finally, he had a use for that Qi charger he’s had lying around since the Galaxy S5 era. [Don] pried the earbud case open with a guitar pick and found a nicely laid-out charging circuit board without any black goop.

Once he located ground and Vcc pads, it was just a matter of performing a bit of surgery on the coil’s pins so he could solder wires there instead. Miraculously, the Qi coil fit perfectly inside the bottom of the case and the plastic is thin enough that it doesn’t interfere with the charging.

Want to try it for yourself? [Don]’s done an excellent job of documenting this hack, with clear pictures of every step. Soon you’ll be able to rid yourself of all those pesky USB cables.

Of course, [Don] still has to plug the charging base into the wall. If he ever wanted to add another level of wireless, he could always retrofit the base coil into his laptop.

by Kristina Panos at October 07, 2019 11:00 AM

October 06, 2019

KXStudio News

JACK2 v1.9.13 release

A new version of JACK2 has just been released.
You can grab the latest release source code at https://github.com/jackaudio/jack2/releases.
The official changelog is:

  • Meta-data API implementation. (and a few tools updated with support for it)
  • Correct GPL licence to LGPL for files needed to build libjack.
  • Remove FreeBoB backend (superseded by FFADO).
  • define JACK_LIB_EXPORT, useful for internal clients.
  • Mark jack_midi_reset_buffer as deprecated.
  • Add example systemd unit file
  • Signal to systemd when jackd is ready.
  • Set "seq" alsa midi driver to maximum resolution possible.
  • Fix loading internal clients from another internal client.
  • Code cleanup and various fixes. (too many to mention here, see git log for details)

This release is focused on meta-data support, and this is why it took so long.
There might be odd cases here and there and a few bugs, as it is often the case for all software...
So please make sure to report back any issues!

Special thanks goes to Rui Nuno Capela for the initial pull-request regarding meta-data.
There was some work needed afterwards, but that was the biggest hurdle and motivation needed for a new release. :)

There are still no updated macOS or Windows builds, those will be handled at a later date.
Current plan is to have JACK1 feature-parity first (only a2jmidid and zita internal clients missing now),
and afterwards merging examples/tools and header files to be shared between JACK1 and JACK2.

The situation regarding development of JACK and JACK1 considered legacy has not changed since last release 2 years ago.
See https://kx.studio/News/?action=view&url=jack2-1912-release-and-future-plans for more information.

PS: I will be in Cologne for Sonoj, giving a talk about "Past, Present and Future of JACK".
There is no registration fee, so please feel free to come by and say hello! :)

by falkTX at October 06, 2019 09:37 PM

October 04, 2019

blog4

performances in October

Tina Mariane Krogh Madsen and Malte Steiner will do a collaborate unamplified sound performance as a part of the PAB Open 2019 at Hotel Terminus in Bergen (NO) organised and curated by Performance Art Bergen. The performance will be on October 5 and 6.

About the performance “relation[site]sounding”:

Two performers are interacting with and searching for sounds within the hotel room. The focus is on the sounding of objects and the relations they create in the space. There is no amplification. There will be action and silence. The performers and all elements should be regarded as an assemblage of vibrant matter. Becoming, relating, affecting. Within the performance there will be a shift in dynamics both between the performers and in the actions. Only elements already in the room are used.


Event and program on PAB-website: https://performanceartbergen.no/en/program-overview/pab-open-19/

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/2412717008976490/



Tina Mariane Krogh Madsen will do the solo installation and performance BB [02/19] at Art Room 1000fryd, Kattesundet 10 (on the 1st floor), 9000 Aalborg (DK).
The installation will run from October 9-11.2019
Performance on October 9 at 16.30.

Blue Blood was an art installation created for the first floor of 1000fryd for the Culture Night October 11, 2002. Seventeen years later this material is to be re-visited in the same room that houses Art Room 1000fryd today. The project is thus site-specific and for this actualization and de/reconstruction dependent on this specific space.

In its original form Blue Blood was also a deconstruction, a reinterpretation of identity and gender roles as we know them. The installation was part of a series of art projects working with the rewriting of normative ideals. Now this narration needs to be shaken again. The original installation should here be regarded as the main text whose elements are discussed through their de/reconstruction. Meanings are broken down and new connections emerge where fragments from previous appearances and dialogues create new dissonances and resonances.



BB [02/19] is in its new form a dynamic entity. The actual de/reconstruction will be performed as an opening performance whose duration is dictated by its process. It is an essential part of the transformation that all elements are seen as active agents in a dialogue, in a new state of becoming.The performance consists of several smaller actions which are ritualistic, transformative and expressive. There will be a natural improvisational approach to working with the different elements.

The remains will be installed in the room for the next two days, along with the sound of the opening performance and its actions. Here an interaction occurs between the action itself (which is in the past, the ephemeral) and the performance document as installation (the traces of both the deconstruction and the original installation). This dual reference raises questions to what happens during the reactivation of artistic material, where a historical relation is created to the artist’s practice, both then and now.


Link to event on 1000fryd website: http://1000fryd.dk/index.php?ufo=koncert&id=4755&new=true

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/2499103256825128/




by herrsteiner (noreply@blogger.com) at October 04, 2019 08:50 AM

September 27, 2019

Talk Unafraid

An evening in the hobby

I’ve gotten into quite a good routine, sequence, whatever you might call it, for my hobby. While it’s an excellent hobby when it comes to complex things to fiddle around with, once you actually get some dark, clear skies, you don’t want to waste a minute, particularly in the UK.

Not having an observatory means a lot of my focus is on a quick setup, but it also means I’ve gotten completely remote operation (on a budget) down pretty well.

I took a decision to leave my setup outdoors some time ago, and bought a good quality cover rated for 365-days-of-the-year protection from Telegizmos. So far it’s survived, despite abuse from cats and birds. The telescope, with all its imaging gear (most of the time), sits underneath on its stock tripod, on some anti-vibration pads from Celestron. I also got some specialist insurance and set a camera nearby – it’s pretty well out of the way and past a bit of security anyway, but it doesn’t hurt to be careful. Setting up outside has been the best thing I’ve done so far, and is further evidence in support of building an observatory!

The telescope, illuminated from an oversize flat frame generator, after a night of imaging.

Keeping the camera mounted means I can re-use flat frames between nights, though occasionally I will take it out to re-collimate if it’s been a while. The computer that connects to all the hardware remains, too – a Raspberry Pi 4 mounted in a Maplin project case on the telescope tube.

This means everything stays connected and all I have to do is walk out, plug a mains extension cable in, bring out a 12V power supply, and plug in two cables – one for the mount, and one for the rest. Some simple snap-fit connector blocks distribute the 12V and 5V supplies around the various bits of equipment on the telescope.

That makes for quite calm setup, which I can do hours in advance of darkness in these early season nights. The telescope’s already cooled down to ambient, so there’s no delay there, either. I’ve already taken steps to better seal up my telescope tube to protect against stray light, which also helps keep any would-be house guests out.

My latest addition to the setup is an old IP camera so I can remotely look at the telescope position. This eliminates the need for me to take my laptop outside whenever the telescope is moving – I can confirm the position of the telescope and hit the “oh no please stop” button if anything looks amiss, like the telescope swinging towards a tripod leg.

I use the KStars/Ekos ecosystem for telescope control and imaging, so this all runs on a Linux laptop which I usually VNC into from my desktop. This means I can pull data off the laptop as I go and work on e.g. calibration of data on the desktop.

A normal evening – PixInsight, in this case looking at some integration approaches for dark frames, and VNC into KStars/Ekos, with PHD2 guiding, and a webcam view of the telescope

So other than 10 minutes at the start and 10 minutes in the early hours of the following morning my observing nights are mostly spent indoors sat in front of a computer. That makes for a fairly poor hobby in terms of getting out of my seat and moving around, but a really good hobby in terms of staying warm!

I do often wander out for half an hour or so and try to get some visual observation in, using a handheld Opticron monocular. Honestly, the monocular isn’t much use – it’s hard to hold steady enough, and low-magnification. Just standing out under the stars and trying to spot some constellations and major stars is satisfying, but I’d quite like to get a visual telescope I can leave set up and use while the imaging rig is doing its thing. That’s a fair bit of time+money away though, and I’d prefer to get the observatory built first. On a dark night, lying down and staring up at the milky way is quite enough to be getting on with.

A typical night, though, involves sitting indoors with the telescope under its cover, and yelling at clouds or the moon (which throws out enough light to ruin contrast on deep space objects).

On that basis I’ve been thinking about other ways to enjoy the hobby that don’t involve dark, clear nights. Some good narrowband filters would let me image on moonlit nights, but run into the many hundreds of pounds, putting a set of Ha/OIII/SII filters around £1k.

Narrowband image, shot in the hydrogen alpha emission line using a Baader 7nm filter – cheap but cheerful – of some of the Elephant’s Trunk Nebula; ~7.5 hours of capture

Making my own telescope, though, struck me as a fun project. It’s something quite frequently done, but the bit that most interested me is mirror making. That’s quite a cheap project (£100 or so) to get started on and should take a few months of evenings, so ought to keep me busy for a while – so that’s the next thing to do. I’ve decided to start with an 8″ f/5 mirror – not only is it quite a small and simple mirror, I could place it directly into my existing telescope without having to spend any more money. I’ve been doing lots of research, reading books on the topic and watching videos from other mirror-makers.

And that is definitely one of the recurring themes throughout the hobby – there’s always something to improve on, and nothing is trivially grasped. Everything takes a bit of commitment and thought. I think that’s one of the reasons I enjoy it so much.

by James Harrison at September 27, 2019 11:14 PM

September 26, 2019

News – Ubuntu Studio

Ubuntu Studio 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) Beta Released

The Ubuntu Studio team is pleased to announce the beta release of Ubuntu Studio 19.10, codenamed Eoan Ermine. While this beta is reasonably free of any showstopper CD build or installer bugs, you may find some bugs within. This image is, however, reasonably representative of what you will find when Ubuntu Studio 19.10 is released […]

by eeickmeyer at September 26, 2019 04:45 PM

September 23, 2019

GStreamer News

GStreamer 1.16.1 stable bug fix release

The GStreamer team is pleased to announce the first bug fix release in the stable 1.16 release series of your favourite cross-platform multimedia framework!

This release only contains bugfixes and it should be safe to update from 1.16.x.

See /releases/1.16/ for the details.

Binaries for Android, iOS, Mac OS X and Windows will be available shortly.

Download tarballs directly here: gstreamer, gst-plugins-base, gst-plugins-good, gst-plugins-ugly, gst-plugins-bad, gst-libav, gst-rtsp-server, gst-python, gst-editing-services, gst-validate, gstreamer-vaapi, or gst-omx.

September 23, 2019 11:00 PM

September 14, 2019

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

The future of LMP

LMP will continue to live on as a static site, so all content will continue to be available. We are in the process of moving the site. Stay tuned for more news.

Thank you for all support, content, comments and visits!

Now on to produce some Libre Music! :)

by admin at September 14, 2019 06:14 AM

September 12, 2019

Internet Archive - Collection: osmpodcast

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September 12, 2019 12:58 AM

August 24, 2019

Talk Unafraid

A focused approach

In my last post on astrophotography I wrote about planning for dark skies and about my plans to build an observatory. Well, finances haven’t permitted for the observatory – this year – so this month I opted to get my existing telescope and mount working at their theoretical best.

This mostly boiled down to:

  • Improving the ability to achieve and hold accurate focus
  • Getting the mount running as smoothly and accurately as possible
  • Making small improvements to the way I set things up
  • Getting the optics as precisely collimated as possible

If I do all those things then the limiting factors should be the intrinsic limits of the kit I have and the environment, and I should be able to produce some great pictures with all that! So I started off, knowing the focuser was mechanically weak and a real problem in terms of operating the scope, by replacing the focuser.

Focusers and motors

This started out as a “undo 4 bolts, replace 4 bolts” project and turned into a bit more work. It also required me to remove the secondary mirror for the first time, which meant tooling up to collimate that properly – my laser isn’t enough to set the position completely.

The new, on the left, and the old. Note the chunkier construction, much bigger bearings, and the larger motors. The new one’s also larger, and internally baffled to help cut down on stray light.

The holes in the tube didn’t quite fit the new plate, so I had to drill new holes – I measured very carefully, several times, with different measurement approaches (not wishing to recreate the Hubble problem of relying on a single instrument). The position isn’t critical but it makes life easier if it’s in the right place.

Nervous drilling

The focuser I went for was a Baader Steeltrack Diamond. To summarise the choice, there’s only a few major groups of manufacturers – Moonlite and friends sit at the “fine for visual, okay for imaging” end of things with traditional Crayford designs. Then you’ve got people like Baader and JTW who are a bit more serious about focuser slop and rigidity. Then there’s Feather-Touch. FT appear to be held in messianic regard by literally everyone, which I can only assume is for good reason. They’re also two to three times the price. Which rules them out. Baader’s Diamond NT focuser appeared to be very well regarded mechanically, and having bought a number of parts from them I knew they were of good quality.

It didn’t disappoint – it’s very well made, and manual movement of the focuser when it arrived was buttery. I popped the fine focus knob off and prepared it for the addition of the focus motor

If you’ve not done imaging before you might think that motorising a focuser is a bit excessive – and indeed when I started out I just focused manually once at the start of the evening and then left the camera to it. But to get the most out of a telescope, frequent or constant refocusing is needed, to compensate for contraction of the telescope and optics due to temperature change. It’s also useful to be able to let the computer focus for you to achieve the most precise focus.

Again, there are many options here. I opted for a lower cost option which was fairly well reviewed, the Primaluce Lab Sesto Senso focus motor. This despite it missing a key feature, temperature compensation. This feature automatically moves the motor based on a temperature reading, rather than having the computer do it for you. However, most software supports doing this. Sadly, KStars/Ekos does not – yet.

The new focuser and motor installed on the tube

Spot the difference

After installing the focuser and motor I had to re-install the secondary and collimate it – this was actually pretty straightforward. However I also wanted to replace the centre spot on my telescope with a “hotspot” to make barlow laser and autocollimator checks easier, so the primary mirror came out too. Both got a very gentle soak and rinse with no agitation, and then the old primary spot was removed with some isopropyl alcohol.

The old spot and mirror in its cell
The mirror, spotless!
Spotting the mirror using a Cats Eye template, weighted down with cotton wool. There was a lot of careful staring at this before I affixed the spot.
The completed install.

After this there was just a lot of very time consuming adjustment to get everything set up as well as possible. This mostly just involved staring down cheshire eyepieces and then moving things very slowly with an allen key until it all looked like it should.

A quick barlowed laser check as part of reassembly, looking down the tube – you can see the reflection of the centre trefoil in the middle, which is actually a reflection off a piece of paper in the bottom of the barlow in the focuser.

I still need to add an autocollimator to my toolbox, but the Catseye ones are quite dear, so that’s a “next month” purchase. That will however be the last tool I need to add there, I think!

Mount problems

I had been seeing issues with my tracking the last few attempts I made to set up, so wanted to verify my mount was mechanically sound. This mostly involved adjusting the worm carrier blocks – large metal blocks which form both part of the housing and the mechanism by which the worm meshing can be adjusted. This, again, involved a lot of slackening off one thing, tightening another, then rotating the whole axis through 360 degrees to make sure nothing bound or stuck.

Dismantling an axis driver to check everything is okay – the worm carrier block is the lower bit of metal, where the big gear sits. Behind this is the worm gear shaft.

After a lot of measurement, trying to work out what was going on, I realised it was the obvious thing – polar alignment. My Polemaster – a camera that sits on the mount to do a polar alignment – wasn’t getting good enough results, and that was all I was using. I used a method called drift alignment and improved from ~15 arcminutes accuracy down to about 2 arcminutes. This has radically improved my guiding, which is now down at around 1 arcsecond – where it should be! The adjustment knobs on the EQ6-R Pro are the limiting factor now – it’s just not possible to get the alignment much better.

Balancing the mount more carefully has helped, too, and I’ve rotated the telescope in its tube so the focuser points at the RA axis. This means that as the axis rotates the weight distribution remains constant. It also means I can’t really use the telescope for visual observation, but I’ve not done that in a long while!

I’ve also added some Celestron anti-vibration pads to the tripod. While a cubic metre or two of concrete would be better, these should help isolate vibration from the ground and also help with oscillation in the tripod itself as a result of mount movement.

To help minimise the number of cables coming off the mount I’ve also put my INDI server on the tube itself by mounting a Raspberry Pi, 12V-5V step-down, and USB hub. This also helps to counterbalance the focuser around the Dec axis. There’s now only three cables to the mount – 12V, Ethernet, and the mount control cable.

The other major upgrades I’ve made lately have been on guidescope mounting – I now have some very solid aluminium guidescope brackets that a colleague at work milled for me. This does appear to have solved the differential flexure problem. I still want to upgrade the camera and explore off-axis guiding, but it’s a great improvement.

Worth it?

It’s too early to say, really, but the indication is that probably, together, this has all produced a much improved system for astrophotography for not much (in AP terms) money. This image of M101, the Pinwheel galaxy, I produced last night with less than 2 hours of light:

Precise focus has helped massively, though temperature compensation and per-filter focus offset automation would be very welcome additions to Ekos – it might even be enough to push me back to Sequence Generator Pro, though I’m very much enjoying the INDI/Linux approach so far (bugs that require me to completely shut down KStars mid-session aside). The mount guiding is definitely a big upgrade over where it was – I think I had broadly been getting lucky with this over winter, though I suspect the colder atmosphere might’ve helped the Polemaster.

All in all it’s a good step forward – now I just need some really cold clear skies!

by James Harrison at August 24, 2019 06:34 PM

July 22, 2019

Audio – Stefan Westerfeld's blog

SpectMorph 0.5.0 released

A new version of SpectMorph, my audio morphing software, is now available on www.spectmorph.org. SpectMorph is a VST/LV2/JACK synthesis engine which is based on the idea of analyzing audio samples and combining them using morphing.

SpectMorph could always create sounds by morphing between the musical instruments bundled with SpectMorph. With this release, a new graphical instrument editor was added, which allows loading custom samples. So SpectMorph users can now create user defined instruments and morph between them.

Here is a screencast which demonstrates how to do it.

Besides this big change, the releases contains a few smaller improvements. A detailed list of changes is available here.

Finally, here is some new music made with SpectMorph:

by stw at July 22, 2019 02:45 PM