planet.linuxaudio.org

February 08, 2016

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA]

Zynaddsubfx 2.5.3 - “Chiron” Released

I’d say it’s a good day for a new release, wouldn’t you? Zynaddsubfx has
reached version 2.5.3 including some exciting new changes for the
now-officially supported VST and LV2 plugin versions! In addition to the
usual bugfixes some rich new features have been added such as:

- Add LV2&VST support via DPF - zyn is now working as a native linux plugin
in most DAWs! Other platforms coming soon. I know I’m sure excited about
this...

- Add autosave - Just in case of the rare crash, this can be a lifesaver

- Add realtime filter parameter updates - For smoother, wilder filter
tweaking

- Add LFO random mode - adds sample and hold module integrated to the LFO,
great for classic bleep-blop computer sounds (and a hundred other things)

- Add more controls to DSSI plugin - For more knob turning sonic
automation-exploration in DSSI plugin hosts

- Add fixed frequency modulators - Easier FM operations

- Add more reset states to knobs/sliders - double click will put it back to
the default state, so you don’t need to be afraid of turning that knob, you
can always go back.

- Add PWM mod - Sweet sweeping from nasally to full bodied square waves

- Fix Microtonal UI - if you do microtonal music, this is a huge deal!

- Fix 'Add Bank' - easier organization for all your patches

- Fix sustain bugs in 2.5.x series - So you can keep your feet below your
keyboard to play more notes

- Fix mem pool exhaustion bug - a boon to stability

- Fix PADnote and Oscilgen copy/paste - for quicker sound design

- Fix Midi unlearn - If you want to map that knob to something else...

- Other miscellaneous bug fixes

- New Presets in the 'olivers-other' bank.

That should fix any case of the Mondays. And here’s the contribution score
card by number of commits since 2.5.2:

36 Christopher A. Oliver

29 Mark McCurry

28 Filipe Coelho

12 Olivier Jolly

2 Jaromír Mikeš

1 Johannes Lorenz

1 Friedolino

1 Alessio Treglia

Many thanks to them and all others who contributed by submitting feedback,
bug reports, troubleshooting, or even just making music. We’d love to see
more!

Now go make some noise!

--Team Zyn.

Project Page:
http://zynaddsubfx.sf.net/

Download:
https://sourceforge.net/projects/zynaddsubfx/files/zynaddsubfx/2.5.3/

Mailing List:
https://sourceforge.net/p/zynaddsubfx/mailman/

Forums:
http://www.kvraudio.com/forum/viewforum.php?f=47

Bug/Feature Tracker:
https://sourceforge.net/p/zynaddsubfx/bugs/?source=navbar

IRC:
##zynaddsubfx on FreeNode

by gmail.com at February 08, 2016 07:46 PM

February 05, 2016

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] Faust Awards 2016 : call for participation

[Sorry for cross-posting, please distribute.]

Faust Open Source Software Competition
=======================================
(Submission Deadline: June 1, 2016)

Overview
---------
The Faust Open-Source Software Competition is intended to promote
innovative high-quality free audio software developed with the Faust
programming language, as well as development tools build around the Faust
compiler itself. The Faust Open-Source Software award will be attributed to
the best submission by an international committee of leading experts in the
field. The competition is sponsored by Grame, centre national de création
musicale. The winning software will receive a 2000€ price to encourage its
authors. The results will be announced July 15, 2016.

To participate, the software must be provided with source code and licensed
with a Free/Open Source license. A substantial part of the software must be
written in Faust and the Faust source code must be provided. As part of the
review process, the software will be built from the sources. All source
code, license, video demonstration, installation instructions, and any
other documentation must be available on a public web page. License
compatibility with other open source software is encouraged. Dependencies
on non-open source third-party software are discouraged, with the exception
of operating systems and freely available commercial packages.

Authors are required to prepare a video demonstrating the software. This
video must be done carefully, and should convincingly present the qualities
of the software. The submission must also contain any useful documentation,
including examples of how the provided software might be used, existing
prototypes that use the software, download statistics or other public usage
information. The criteria for judging submissions includes broad
applicability and potential impact, novelty, technical depth, reusability,
etc.

Junior Competition
------------------
In parallel to the Faust Open-Source Software Competition we introduce this
year a junior competition, the Faust Student Software Competition, with a
200€ prize for the winner. The Faust Student Software Competition is
intended to promote interesting audio processing and synthesis applications
written in Faust in a single file in less than 1000 words. The word count
is done after removing the comments from the code:

cat foo.dsp | stripcmt | wc -w.

The use of the standard Faust libraries is strongly encouraged. They don't
take part in the word count.

Important dates
---------------
- Start of the competition: February 8, 2016
- Software Submission Deadline: June 1, 2016
- Results of the competition: July 1, 2016

Submission Guidelines
---------------------
Authors interested in participating in the Faust Open Source Software
Competition or the Faust Student Software Competition should send a
submission email to <faustaward@grame.fr> with a PDF file attached
containing the following information:

- Title of submission,
- Category of submission (*Faust Open Source Software Competition* or
*Faust Student Software Competition*),
- Name, email and affiliation of the main author,
- Names, emails and affiliations of other authors,
- A permanent link for the open source software (e.g., Sourceforge, GitHub,
Google Code, etc.),
- A permanent link for the video demonstration (e.g., YouTube, Vimeo, etc.),
- A link to a compressed archive file that contains the software (source
code, documentation, build/install instructions, and licenses).
Comprehensive and clear build/install instructions will be a crucial
component of any submission. The committee will make a reasonable effort to
build the software for the top contributions, but if they are unable to
make the software run, it will be excluded from the competition.

International Committee
-----------------------
- Jean-Louis Giavitto (IRCAM, Paris, France),
- Albert Gräf (Johannes Gutenberg U., Mainz, Germany),
- Pierre Jouvelot (Ecole des Mines, Paris, France),
- Victor Lazzarini (Maynooth U., Maynooth, Ireland),
- Romain Michon (CCRMA, Stanford , USA)
- Yann Orlarey (Grame, Lyon, France),
- Dave Phillips (Musician/Journalist, Findlay, USA)
- Laurent Pottier (U. Jean Monnet, Saint Etienne, France),
- Julius Smith (CCRMA, Stanford , USA)

Previous Winners
----------------
- 2015: [Guitarix](http://guitarix.sourceforge.net/), by Hermann Meyer and
Andreas Degert


Yann Orlarey
GRAME

by grame.fr at February 05, 2016 10:51 AM

February 04, 2016

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

TuxGuitar 1.3.0 released

After over six years without a release, TuxGuitar 1.3.0 is now available with lots of fixes and new features. Here's a list of changes from TuxGuitar website:

by Eduardo at February 04, 2016 12:52 AM

January 29, 2016

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

AV Linux 2016 news

Glen McArthur has just posted a preview video of what will become the next release of AV Linux. The upcoming release will be based on a carefully put together version of Debian testing, optimised for use with audio production.

by Conor at January 29, 2016 06:59 PM

January 28, 2016

autostatic.com

Using the Tascam US-144MKII with Linux

Today I got a Tascam US-144MKII from a colleague because he couldn’t use it anymore with Mac OSX. Apparently this USB2.0 audio interface stopped working on El Capitan. Tascam claims they’re working on a driver but they’re only generating bad publicity with that announcement it seems. So he gave it to me, maybe it would work on Linux.

Tascam US-144MKIITascam US-144MKII

First thing I did was plugging it in. The snd_usb_122l module got loaded but that was about it. So much for plug and play. There are reports though that this interface should work so when I got home I started digging a bit deeper. Apparently you have to disable the ehci_hcd USB driver, which is actually the USB2.0 controller driver, and force the US-144MKII to use the uhci_hcd USB1.1 driver instead so that it thinks it’s in USB1.1 mode. This limits the capabilities of the device but my goal for today was to get sound out of this interface, not getting the most out of it.

I quickly found out that on my trusty XPS13 forcing USB1.1 was probably not going to work because it only has USB3.0 ports. So I can disable the ehci_hcd driver but then it seems the xhci_hcd USB3.0 driver takes over. And disabling that driver effectively disables all USB ports. So I grabbed an older notebook with USB2.0 ports and disabled the ehci_hcd driver by unbinding it since it’s not compiled as a module. Unbinding a driver is done by writing the system ID of a device to a so-called unbind file of the driver that is bound to this device. In this case we’re interested in the system ID’s of the devices that use the ehci_hcd driver which can be found in /sys/bus/drivers/ehci-pci/:

# ls /sys/bus/pci/drivers/ehci-pci/
0000:00:1a.7  bind  new_id  remove_id  uevent  unbind
# echo -n "0000:00:1a.7" > /sys/bus/pci/drivers/ehci-pci/unbind

This will unbind the ehci_hcd driver from the device with system ID 0000:00:1a.7 which in this case is an USB2.0 controller.When plugging in the USB interface it now got properly picked up by the system and I was greeted with an active green USB led on the interface as proof.

$ cat /proc/asound/cards
 0 [Intel          ]: HDA-Intel - HDA Intel
                      HDA Intel at 0xf4800000 irq 46
 1 [US122L         ]: USB US-122L - TASCAM US-122L
                      TASCAM US-122L (644:8020 if 0 at 006/002

So ALSA picked it up as a device but it doesn’t show up in the list of sound cards when issuing aplay -l. This is because you have to tell ALSA to talk to the device in a different way then to a normal audio interface. Normally an audio interface can be addressed by using the hw plugin which is the most low-level ALSA plugin that does nothing more than talking to the driver and this is what most applications use, including JACK. The US-144MKII works differently though, its driver snd_usb_122l has to be accessed with the use of the usb_stream plugin which is part of the libasound2-plugins package and that allows you to set a PCM device name that can be used with JACK for instance. This can be done with the following .asoundrc file that you have to create in the root of your home directory:

pcm.us-144mkii {
        type usb_stream
        card "US122L"
}

ctl.us-144mkii {
        type hw
        card "US122L"
}

What we do here is creating a PCM device called us-144mkii and coupling that to the card name we got from cat /proc/asound/cards which is US122L. Of course you can name the PCM device anything you want. Almost all other examples name it usb_stream but that’s a bit confusing because that is the name of the plugin and you’d rather have a name that has some relation to the device you’re using. Also practically all examples use card numbers. But who says that the USB audio interface will always be card 0, or 1. It could also be 2, or 10 if you have 9 other audio interfaces. Other examples work around this by fixing the order of the numbers that get assigned to each available audio interface by adjusting the index parameter for the snd_usb_122l driver. But why do that when ALSA also accepts the name of the card? This also makes thing a lot easier to read, it’s now clear that we are coupling the PCM name us-144mkii to the card named US122L. And we’re avoiding having to edit system-wide settings. The ctl stanza is not strictly necessary but it prevents the following warning when starting JACK:

ALSA lib control.c:953:(snd_ctl_open_noupdate) Invalid CTL us-144mkii
control open "us-144mkii" (No such file or directory)

So with the .asoundrc in place you can try starting JACK:

$ jackd -P85 -t2000 -dalsa -r48000 -p512 -n2 -Cus-144mkii -Pus-144mkii
jackd 0.124.2
Copyright 2001-2009 Paul Davis, Stephane Letz, Jack O'Quinn, Torben Hohn and others.
jackd comes with ABSOLUTELY NO WARRANTY
This is free software, and you are welcome to redistribute it
under certain conditions; see the file COPYING for details

no message buffer overruns
JACK compiled with System V SHM support.
loading driver ..
apparent rate = 48000
creating alsa driver ... us-144mkii|us-144mkii|512|2|48000|0|0|nomon|swmeter|-|32bit
configuring for 48000Hz, period = 512 frames (10.7 ms), buffer = 2 periods
ALSA: final selected sample format for capture: 24bit little-endian in 3bytes format
ALSA: use 2 periods for capture
ALSA: final selected sample format for playback: 24bit little-endian in 3bytes format
ALSA: use 2 periods for playback

This translates to the following settings in QjackCtl:

QjackCtl Settings - Parameters - US-144MKIIQjackCtl Settings – Parameters QjackCtl Settings - Advanced - US-144MKIIQjackCtl Settings – Advanced

Don’t expect miracles of this setup. You won’t be able to achieve super low-latencies but at least you can still use your Tascam US-144MKII instead of having to give it away to a colleague.

The post Using the Tascam US-144MKII with Linux appeared first on autostatic.com.

by jeremy at January 28, 2016 10:46 PM

rncbc.org

Qtractor 0.7.4 - The Tackiest Gluon released!

Ahoy there!

Qtractor 0.7.4 (the tackiest gluon) has been released!

Y'all know the drill...

Qtractor is an audio/MIDI multi-track sequencer application written in C++ with the Qt framework. Target platform is Linux, where the Jack Audio Connection Kit (JACK) for audio and the Advanced Linux Sound Architecture (ALSA) for MIDI are the main infrastructures to evolve as a fairly-featured Linux desktop audio workstation GUI, specially dedicated to the personal home-studio.

Change-log:

  • Eye-candy warning: muted/non-soloed tracks are now shaded over the main thumb-view.
  • Faster and crispier VST plugin editor (GUI) idle cycles.
  • Fixed all core processing when any plugin has more audio outputs than channels on a track/bus where it's inserted.
  • Added one decimal digit to all percentage input spin-boxes on the MIDI Tools dialog.
  • Added brand new and global option to disable the so called "catch-up" default behaviour (cf. View/Controllers.../Sync).
  • Fixed some track control issues related to MIDI Controllers generic mapping (cf. View/Controllers...).
  • Try making Help/Shortcuts... dialog window modeless, as far as under MIDI Controller, Inputs/Outputs Connections window also gets accessible enough.
  • Fixed some vertical scrolling and play-head line re-drawing glitches introduced by the recent unlimited slack to editing beyond current contents length on main tracks view.
  • Added one decimal digit to the Pitch-shift spin-box on audio Clip/Edit... properties dialog window.
  • Added application keywords to freedesktop.org's AppData.
  • Fixed local keyboard shortcuts on the Files organizer widget actions and context-menu.
  • Improved Mixer multi-row layout (patch by Holger Marzen aka. bluebell, thanks).
  • Fixed the Ctrl+drag/cloning left of a clip when towards near the beginning of session.

Enjoy && have (lots of) fun.

Flattr this

Website:

http://qtractor.sourceforge.net

Project page:

http://sourceforge.net/projects/qtractor

Downloads:

http://sourceforge.net/projects/qtractor/files

Wiki (on going, help still wanted!):

http://sourceforge.net/p/qtractor/wiki/

License:

Qtractor is free, open-source Linux Audio software, distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL) version 2 or later.

Enjoy && have (lots of) fun.

by rncbc at January 28, 2016 08:00 PM

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] Qtractor 0.7.4 - The Tackiest Gluon released!

Ahoy there!

Qtractor 0.7.4 (the tackiest gluon) has been released!

Y'all know the drill...

Qtractor [1] is an audio/MIDI multi-track sequencer application
written in C++ with the Qt framework [2]. Target platform is Linux,
where the Jack Audio Connection Kit (JACK [3]) for audio and the
Advanced Linux Sound Architecture (ALSA [4]) for MIDI are the main
infrastructures to evolve as a fairly-featured Linux desktop audio
workstation GUI, specially dedicated to the personal home-studio.

Change-log:
- Eye-candy warning: muted/non-soloed tracks are now shaded over the
main thumb-view.
- Faster and crispier VST plugin editor (GUI) idle cycles.
- Fixed all core processing when any plugin has more audio outputs than
channels on a track/bus where it's inserted.
- Added one decimal digit to all percentage input spin-boxes on the MIDI
Tools dialog.
- Added brand new and global option to disable the so called "catch-up"
default behavior (cf. View/Controllers.../Sync).
- Fixed some track control issues related to MIDI Controllers generic
mapping (cf. View/Controllers...).
- Try making Help/Shortcuts... dialog window modeless, as far as under
MIDI Controller, Inputs/Outputs Connections window also gets accessible
enough.
- Fixed some vertical scrolling and play-head line re-drawing glitches
introduced by the recent unlimited slack to editing beyond current
contents length on main tracks view.
- Added one decimal digit to the Pitch-shift spin-box on audio
Clip/Edit... properties dialog window.
- Added application keywords to freedesktop.org's AppData.
- Fixed local keyboard shortcuts on the Files organizer widget actions
and context-menu.
- Improved Mixer multi-row layout (patch by Holger Marzen aka. bluebell,
thanks).
- Fixed the Ctrl+drag/cloning left of a clip when towards near the
beginning of session.

Website:
http://qtractor.sourceforge.net

Project page:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/qtractor

Downloads:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/qtractor/files

- source tarball:
http://download.sf.net/qtractor/qtractor-0.7.4.tar.gz

- source package (openSUSE Tumbleweed):
http://download.sf.net/qtractor/qtractor-0.7.4-22.rncbc.suse.src.rpm

- binary packages (openSUSE Tumbleweed):
http://download.sf.net/qtractor/qtractor-0.7.4-22.rncbc.suse.i586.rpm
http://download.sf.net/qtractor/qtractor-0.7.4-22.rncbc.suse.x86_84.rpm

- wiki (on going, help still wanted!):
http://sourceforge.net/p/qtractor/wiki/

Weblog (on going, upstream support):
http://www.rncbc.org

License:
Qtractor [1] is free, open-source Linux Audio [5] software,
distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL [6])
version 2 or later.

References:

[1] Qtractor - An audio/MIDI multi-track sequencer
http://qtractor.sourceforge.net

[2] Qt framework, C++ class library and tools for
cross-platform application and UI development
http://qt.io/

[3] JACK Audio Connection Kit
http://jackaudio.org

[4] ALSA, Advanced Linux Sound Architecture
http://www.alsa-project.org/

[5] Linux Audio consortium of libre software for audio-related work
http://linuxaudio.org

[6] GPL - GNU General Public License
http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/gpl.html

See also:
http://www.rncbc.org/drupal/node/1000

Enjoy && Have (lots of) fun.
--
rncbc aka. Rui Nuno Capela
_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-announce mailing list
Linux-audio-announce@lists.linuxaudio.org
http://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-announce

by rncbc.org at January 28, 2016 03:22 PM

January 26, 2016

digital audio hacks – Hackaday

Hacking a USB Port Onto an Old Router

Sometimes hacks don’t have to be innovative to be satisfying. We thought that [daffy]’s instructions and video (embedded below the break) for turning an old WRT54G router into an Internet radio were worth a look even if he’s following a well-traveled path and one that we’ve reported on way back when.

The hack itself is simple. [daffy] locates unused USB data lines, adds in a 5V voltage regulator to supply USB bus power, and then connects it all to a USB sound card. Hardware side, done! And while he doesn’t cover the software side of things in this first video, we know where he’s headed.

The WRT54G router was the first commodity Linux-based router to be extensively hacked, and have open-source firmware written for it. If you’re using OpenWRT or dd-wrt on any of your devices, you owe a debt to the early rootability of the WRT54G. Anyway, it’s a good bet that [daffy] is going to find software support for his USB sound card, but we remain in suspense to see just exactly how the details pan out.

Our favorite WRT54G hack is still an oldie: turning a WRT54G into the brains for a robot. But that was eight years ago now, so surely there’s something newer and shinier. What’s the coolest device that you’ve seen a WRT router hacked into?


Filed under: classic hacks, digital audio hacks, wireless hacks

by Elliot Williams at January 26, 2016 05:00 PM

January 25, 2016

OSM podcast

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] AV Linux new URL and other news.

Hi LAU's

If you are or have been an AV Linux user you may be interested in these
changes, if not, as you were, sorry to disturb :)

AV Linux 6.0.4 is now being taken down and has ceased maintenance to
prepare for AV Linux '2016' which will be based on Debian Testing and
pending some further documentation on the new User Manual should have a
Release Candidate available later this month.

Other tidbits happening now or soon:

- Migration to a new Wordpress site for bandshed.net and all related
activities including AV Linux and the AVL Drumkits.
- Removal of the old HTML sites.
- Removal of the AV Linux 6 Deb packages and other related clean up.
- Removal of the AV Linux 6 ISO's, Torrents and Manuals
- Minting of a 'frozen' Release Candidate ISO for AV Linux '2016'
- Continued work on the new manual... it's going slowly I'm afraid and
there is a LOT of new stuff to document.
- A very short screencast about the next AV Linux.

If you have an application that links to AV Linux because it is featured
on the Live ISO please see the updated URLs here:

Bandshed.net: http://www.bandshed.net/wordpress/
AV Linux: http://www.bandshed.net/wordpress/avlinux/
AVL Drumkits: http://www.bandshed.net/wordpress/avldrumkits/

I would like to say thank you to the Linux Audio Users and Developers for
helping AV Linux versions 1-6 to become an actual 'thing', truthfully you
guys are the rock stars and AV Linux was simply a stage for the show and
the spotlight has faded as I've taken time off to do other things and
KXStudio has become the extremely warranted and excellent go-to for many
'Buntu/Debian people. In light of that and having ridden around the
carousel a few times, AV Linux 2016 will hopefully be a much lower profile
affair and simply exist as a shared, ready to use Linux Audio and Video
workstation image for those who need it. Previously AV Linux became many
things that I neither deserved or anticipated and this time time I'd like
to keep it manageable and simply be a facilitator and evangelist for the
great work of you LAD's and leave the Distro guru stuff up to those with
the credentials :). Thanks also to falkTX whose phenomenal applications
and tireless packaging work have taken a huge burden off my shoulders and
made it possible for AVL to continue, sincere thanks also to
linuxaudio.org for the download Mirror, it is very much appreciated.

Thanks, Glen





_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-announce mailing list
Linux-audio-announce@lists.linuxaudio.org
http://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-announce

by bandshed.net at January 25, 2016 04:16 PM

January 24, 2016

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] QMidiRoute 0.4.0 released

Dear all,
on behalf of the QMidiRoute development team, I'm pleased to announce
the release of QMidiRoute 0.4.0.

QMidiRoute is a MIDI event processor and router for the ALSA sequencer
with a graphical interface based on the Qt toolkit.

http://alsamodular.sourceforge.net/

This release fixes a few bugs and provides some minor feature
improvements.
All users should upgrade to 0.4.0.

Please find source tarballs on the release page:

https://sourceforge.net/projects/alsamodular/files/QMidiRoute/0.4.0/



NEWS
====

qmidiroute-0.4.0 (2016-01-24)

Fixed Bugs
o Fixed bug #3028929 (missing update for IndexOutMode when reading map
file)

New Features
o Handler for SIGINT added to handle unsaved or changed files more
carefully at program termination.
o Handler for SIGUSR1 added to provide support for LADISH level 1.
o Add configure option to use Qt5 instead of Qt4 library.


Cheers
Guido

--
http://wie-im-flug.net/
http://www.lug-burghausen.org/

by gmx.net at January 24, 2016 08:02 PM

[LAA] AlsaModularSynth (ams) 2.1.2 released

Dear all,

AlsaModularSynth (ams) is a MIDI controlled realtime modular synthesizer
and effect processor with support for LADSPA and JACK.

http://alsamodular.sourceforge.net/

This release fixes a few bugs and provides some minor feature
improvements.
All users should upgrade to 2.1.2.

Please find source tarballs on the release page:

https://sourceforge.net/projects/alsamodular/files/alsamodular/2.1.2/


NEWS
====

ams-2.1.2 (2016-01-24)

Fixed Bugs
o Fix sequencer module id reading.
o Fix vocoder module, patch provided by Bill Yerazunis
o Fix initialization of freq parameter in lfo module, patch provided
by Christopher Oliver

New Features
o Add portamento input to VC slew module, patch provided by
Christopher Oliver

General Changes
o Clear global filedialog settings to avoid cross application
history spying
o Add 64bit alternative to ladspa search path



Cheers
Guido

--
http://wie-im-flug.net/
http://www.lug-burghausen.org/

by gmx.net at January 24, 2016 07:41 PM

[LAA] seq24 0.9.3 released

Dear all,

seq24 is a pattern based sequencer with strong live performance capabilities.

A new seq24 release is out published by the Seq24team.

https://edge.launchpad.net/seq24/

This release fixes a few bugs and provides some minor
feature improvements.
All users should upgrade to 0.9.3.

Please find source tarballs on the release page:

https://edge.launchpad.net/seq24/trunk/0.9.3


NEWS
====
seq24-0.9.3 (2016-01-24)

Fixed Bugs
* Fix LASH support (crash on 64 Bit systems)
* Fix broken JACK transport with newer jackd version
* Fix clock tick drift
* Fix jack session commandline (obsolete --file option removed)

New Features
* Non recursive make

General Changes
* Some code cleanups
* C++11 compatible compiler required



Cheers
Guido


--
http://wie-im-flug.net/
http://www.lug-burghausen.org/

by gmx.net at January 24, 2016 06:20 PM

January 22, 2016

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] Yoshimi 1.3.8.2

Codenamed 'The Swan'.
After a bit of a scramble to workaround a cmake bug this is now released and as
usual is available at both:

http://sourceforge.net/projects/yoshimi
https://github.com/Yoshimi/yoshimi

--
Will J Godfrey
http://www.musically.me.uk
Say you have a poem and I have a tune.
Exchange them and we can both have a poem, a tune, and a song.
_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-announce mailing list
Linux-audio-announce@lists.linuxaudio.org
http://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-announce

by musically.me.uk at January 22, 2016 09:34 AM

January 20, 2016

GStreamer News

GStreamer Core and Plugins 1.6.3 stable release

The GStreamer team is proud to announce the second bugfix release in the stable 1.6 release series of your favourite cross-platform multimedia framework!

This release only contains bugfixes and it is safe to update from 1.6.x. For a full list of bugfixes see Bugzilla.

See http://gstreamer.freedesktop.org/releases/1.6/ for the full release notes.

Binaries for Android, iOS, Mac OS X and Windows will be provided separately by the GStreamer project.

Check out the release notes for GStreamer core, gst-plugins-base, gst-plugins-good, gst-plugins-ugly, gst-plugins-bad, gst-libav, or or download tarballs for gstreamer, gst-plugins-base, gst-plugins-good, gst-plugins-ugly, gst-plugins-bad, gst-libav.

January 20, 2016 01:00 PM

News – Ubuntu Studio

Ubuntustudio 16.04 Wallpaper Contest!

Contest Entries are here!! >>> https://www.flickr.com/groups/ubuntustudiocreations/pool/ <<< Where is YOUR entry? Ubuntustudio 16.04 will be officially released in April 2016. As this will be a Long Term Support version, we are most anxious to offer an excellent experience on the desktop. Therefore, the Ubuntustudio community will host a wallpaper design contest! The contest is open to […]

by Set Hallstrom at January 20, 2016 11:44 AM

January 19, 2016

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

Configuring Linux for music recording and production

If you're a programmer, you'll find GNU/Linux systems quite powerful and robust. When it comes to areas like visual arts, video, business, or gaming, you'll find some tools with promising potential, but lots of bugs, quirks, and challenges. You can accomplish whatever you need in most cases, but the setup and learning curve may not be as smooth as proprietary options on proprietary systems.

by Conor at January 19, 2016 07:41 PM

January 12, 2016

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] njconnect 1.4

Hi,

I want to give a sign of life in njconnect project by 1.4 version.

In short: njconnect is ncurses jack connection manager.
https://sourceforge.net/projects/njconnect/

Changes since v1.3:
- grid view
- workaround for jack1 which need process callback for graph order callback - I just lost my faith in Jack1 devels for fix this ever :(
- code cleanup

Best Regards
Pawel / Xj


_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-announce mailing list
Linux-audio-announce@lists.linuxaudio.org
http://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-announce

by wp.pl at January 12, 2016 01:20 AM

January 11, 2016

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

LMP Asks #16: An interview with Christie Isaac

This month we talked to Christie Isaac, an upcoming electro-acoustic fusion songwriter from Colchester, UK who incorporates Linux into his music every step of the way. His latest EP "Body Rush" was described as "a masterclass in DIY production" by Paper Champion magazine.

Hi Christie. Thank you for taking the time to do the interview. Where do you live, and what do you do for a living?

by Conor at January 11, 2016 08:48 PM

Ardour 4.6 has been released

Ardour 4.6 has been released with many interesting and useful new features, as well as loads of bug fixes. Let's check out some of what's new.

Track and bus duplication

Tracks and busses can now be duplicated. You'll find this option by right clicking on track headers in the editor window, or by clicking on the track/bus name of a mixer strip in the mixer window. This will duplicate the track/bus with all plugins and plugin settings.

by Conor at January 11, 2016 05:56 PM

ardour

Ardour 4.6 released

Ardour 4.6, our first release of 2016, is now available. 4.6 includes some notable new features - deep support for the Presonus FaderPort control surface, Track/Bus duplication, a new Plugin sidebar for the Mixer window - as well as the usual dozens of fixes and improvements to all aspects of the application, particularly automation editing.

The full list of changes is shown below.

Download  

For the curious, there was no 4.5 release. This just happens sometimes.

read more

by paul at January 11, 2016 05:10 PM

January 08, 2016

News – Ubuntu Studio

Project Lead Vote Dates

We have decided on the dates for the the new project lead vote. The vote will take place during the week from 1st to 6th of February. Only active Ubuntu Studio contributors will be allowed to vote. New candidates will be accepted up until the week before the vote (Jan 25th), so that the Ubuntu […]

by Kaj Ailomaa at January 08, 2016 11:55 AM

January 07, 2016

OpenAV

Fabla2 Progress

Fabla2 Progress

 Hey! Its been a while since we updated you about project progress – Fabla2 has been developed, and we are currently building a final version of the AVL Drumkits. This means adjusting 5 velocity-layers, setting ADSR values for individual samples, adjusting the sends for each sample, and finally mixing all the samples together: no quick job. Rest assured, the quality… Read more →

by harry at January 07, 2016 10:57 PM

January 06, 2016

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] FSTHost 1.6.0

Hello,

Please find new release of FSTHost.
https://sourceforge.net/projects/fsthost/

Changes since 1.5.4 contain:
- Remove zeroize option (-z) - we'll always zeroize buffers
- Control via TCP port ( e.g. via telnet )
- Save TCP port number in /tmp/fsthost directory
- Support for GTK2 or GTK3 or 0 for not GTK
- SIGUSR2 to open vst editor
- fsthost_ctrl - for remote control
- Multiplugin support
- Set port aliases as real plug "pin" names ( -A option )
- Remove tempo ( -t ) command line option.
- Remove BBT sync option ( -B ). Always use Jack BBT sync if available but leave old code as failback.
- Connect MIDI to physical ports as default. Use -j ! for no connect
- By default connect MIDI IN to all physical ports on each graph change
- Rename -p to -M but which opposite meaning
- Option -L display plugins only which the same arch like binnary. fsthost_list still display all plugins
- Add -v option for verbose log
- Add wine-staging support
- Compile embedded editor feature only on demand (EE=1
- Each plugin processing can be separated from each other (-T mode)
- Allow using "-p -" as separator while parse command line options
- Bugfixes, syntax improvements etc.

Best Regards
Xj


_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-announce mailing list
Linux-audio-announce@lists.linuxaudio.org
http://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-announce

by wp.pl at January 06, 2016 01:54 AM

[LAA] FSTHost 1.5.3

Hello,

Please find new release of FSTHost.
https://sourceforge.net/projects/fsthost/

Changes since 1.5.4 contain:
- Remove zeroize option (-z) - we'll always zeroize buffers
- Control via TCP port ( e.g. via telnet )
- Save TCP port number in /tmp/fsthost directory
- Support for GTK2 or GTK3 or 0 for not GTK
- SIGUSR2 to open vst editor
- fsthost_ctrl - for remote control
- Multiplugin support
- Set port aliases as real plug "pin" names ( -A option )
- Remove tempo ( -t ) command line option.
- Remove BBT sync option ( -B ). Always use Jack BBT sync if available but leave old code as failback.
- Connect MIDI to physical ports as default. Use -j ! for no connect
- By default connect MIDI IN to all physical ports on each graph change
- Rename -p to -M but which opposite meaning
- Option -L display plugins only which the same arch like binnary. fsthost_list still display all plugins
- Add -v option for verbose log
- Add wine-staging support
- Compile embedded editor feature only on demand (EE=1
- Each plugin processing can be separated from each other (-T mode)
- Allow using "-p -" as separator while parse command line options
- Bugfixes, syntax improvements etc.

Best Regards
Xj


_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-announce mailing list
Linux-audio-announce@lists.linuxaudio.org
http://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-announce

by wp.pl at January 06, 2016 01:52 AM

January 03, 2016

autostatic.com

Using a Qtractor MIDI track for both MIDI and audio

Basically Qtractor only does either MIDI or audio. The MIDI tracks are for processing MIDI and the audio tracks for processing audio. But a MIDI track in Qtractor can also post-process the audio coming out of a synth plug-in with FX plug-ins so it’s a bit more than just a MIDI track.

But what about plug-ins that do both audio and MIDI, like the LV2 version of the autotuner application zita-at1? If you put it in an audio track it will happily autotune all the audio but it won’t accept any incoming MIDI to pitch only to the MIDI notes it is being fed. And no way you can get MIDI into a Qtractor audio track. There’s no MIDI insert plug-in or the possibility to somehow expose MIDI IN ports of a plug-in in an audio track to Jack MIDI or ALSA.

But Qtractor does have a built-in Insert plug-in that can be fed audio from an audio bus and since a Qtractor MIDI track does know how to handle audio would it also know how to deal with such an insert? Well, yes it can which allows you to use a plug-in like the LV2 version of zita-at1 inside a MIDI track.

Setting up buses and tracks

You will need at least one bus and two tracks (of course you can use different bus and track names):

  • AutoTuneMix bus, input only and 2 channels
  • AutoTune MIDI track with dedicated audio outputs (this will create an audio bus called AutoTune)
  • AutoTuneMix audio track with the AutoTuneMix as input bus

Alternatively you could also skip the use of dedicated audio outputs and have the MIDI track output to the Master bus. This way you avoid the risk of introducing extra latency and the need to set up extra connections. You do lose the flexibility then to do basic stuff on the outcoming audio like panning or adjusting the gain. Which you can also workaround of course by using additional panning and/or gain plug-ins.

Once you’ve created the bus and the tracks insert the following plug-ins into the AutoTune MIDI track:

  • Insert
  • Any pre-processing effects plug-ins (like a compressor) – optional
  • LV2 version of zita-at1 autotuner
  • Any post-processing effects plug-ins (like a reverb) – optional

Insert them into this specific order. It is also possible to do the post-processing in the AutoTuneMix audio track. Now open the Properties window of the Insert plug-in and then open the Returns window. Connect the mic input of your audio device to the Insert/in ports as shown below.

Qtractor AutoTune InsertQtractor AutoTune Insert

Connect the AutoTune bus outputs to the AutoTuneMix inputs:

Qtractor ConnectionsQtractor Connections

Create a MIDI clip with notes to autotune

Create a MIDI clip with the notes you would like to get autotuned in the AutoTune MIDI track, put the play-head on the right position and press play. Now incoming audio from the mic input of your audio device should get autotuned to the MIDI notes you entered in the MIDI clip:

Qtractor Mixer with LV2 version of zita-at1 autotunerQtractor Mixer with LV2 version of zita-at1 autotuner

As you can see both MIDI and audio goes through the AT1 autotuner plug-in and the outcoming audio is being fed into the AutoTuneMix track where you can do the rest of your post-processing if you wish.

The post Using a Qtractor MIDI track for both MIDI and audio appeared first on autostatic.com.

by jeremy at January 03, 2016 07:49 PM

January 01, 2016

Scores of Beauty

“Arnold”

Nearly a year ago I introduced you to significant improvements in LilyPond’s handling of alternative notation fonts and promised a second post. Well, finally here it is, and if you read through it to the end you’ll see why it’s not coincidental that it appears on new year.

Note: This post is based on functionality provided by openLilyLib. openLilyLib is undergoing several substantial changes, therefore information and/or links in this article may not be valid anymore when you read it. If you should notice any such issues please either add a comment or contact us by other means.

New Font Loading Mechanism

The first post ended with a music example using an alternative font, Improviso, which could be activated by these trivial lines:

\include "openlilylib"
\useLibrary Stylesheets
\useNotationFont Improviso
Improviso default appearance (click to view PDF)

Improviso default appearance (click to view PDF)

This is of course a huge improvement over the former approach where you had to add a #(define fonts function in a document’s \paper block in order to change fonts. (And this had also been a huge improvement over what you had to do before.)

But today I would like to direct your attention to a specific issue: the default appearance. Maybe you notice that it’s not just the notation font but the whole score that looks different from usual LilyPond output. If you would simply replace the notation font using the (set-global-fonts) approach shown in the previous post the score would look like this:

Improviso without default stylesheet (click to view PDF)

Improviso without default stylesheet (click to view PDF)

Of course all engraving details in LilyPond’s default appearance have carefully been adjusted to match the appearance of its default font, Emmentaler, the most obvious aspects being the thickness of all sorts of lines. Different fonts may require different settings to look good, and a “handwritten” font like Improviso does so for sure.

Default Stylesheets

So what is the magic that \useNotationFont applies? Well, we have provided default stylesheets for most of the alternative notation fonts, and when the fonts are invoked like this the corresponding stylesheet is automatically loaded. As a result you don’t have to care about adjusting LilyPond’s engraving settings to a different font, everything is done automatically in most cases! Cool, isn’t it?

In order to give you more control over the loading of the font \useNotationFont provides an optional \with {} argument that can be used to set several options through key = value pairs. The above example has been created using the following command:

\useNotationFont \with {
  style = none
} Improviso

Setting style to none causes the font to be activated without any stylesheet, which usually makes sense when you want to define a stylesheet from scratch. But the style option can also be used to select alternative stylesheets (although no such stylesheets are available yet). We intend to also enable locally defined stylesheets, but this is part of the quite long todo list.

Individually Selecting A Brace Font

Most of the alternative fonts ship with a corresponding font for braces, but not all. By default \useNotationFont will fall back to the default Emmentaler when no brace font can be found. However, using the brace option you can control the selection of a brace font, choosing an arbitrary brace font.

\useNotationFont \with {
  brace = "Gutenberg1939"
} LilyJAZZ
LilyJAZZ font with Gutenberg1939 brace font (click to view PDF)

LilyJAZZ font with Gutenberg1939 brace font (click to view PDF)

This example shows a combination of clearly distinct fonts chosen to make the point clear. Nobody would want that in a real-world score, but a practical use case might be to use the Sebastiano brace font – instead of falling back to Emmentaler – together with Scorlatti which doesn’t have its own dedicated brace font.

Arnold: A New Font With Extended Features

I had something like this new interface in mind for some time, but I was finally pushed toward its implementation through the new font Arnold that Abraham Lee created upon my suggestion and that is now (as soon as the site is online again) available from fonts.openlilylib.org. It instantly recreates the atmosphere of a certain repertoire and the characteristic appearance of its original editions. Just let me show you a typical example:

Alban Berg: From

Alban Berg: From “Four pieces” op. 5 (click to view PDF)

A basic stylesheet has been applied, but beyond that no further attempts have been made to tweak this to completely match the original edition. Nevertheless the similarity to Universal Edition scores from around 1910-1920 is astonishing.

In order to show some glyphs of the new font I have deliberately added wrong content here and there – please forgive me if you’re a purist. But once more I have to point towards LilyPond’s outstanding quality of default engraving. There is one limitation that had to be handled manually: LilyPond will always align dynamic letters horizontally to their notes, which doesn’t work well in cramped scores like this. So the f in the middle of the clarinet part, the ff at the beginning of the piano, and the f towards the end of the piano left hand have manually been shifted to the left – please note that I didn’t position them exactly but only added the necessary space so LilyPond could do the actual placement. But apart from this the whole sample has been engraved fully automatically by LilyPond, without the need for any manual intervention.

Interface for Font Extensions

As the previous heading suggests Arnold has “extended features” – and openLilyLib provides a convenient way to access them. The repertoire this font is targeting makes common use of some notation elements not supported by LilyPond and Emmentaler, namely two articulations to indicate strong and weak beats, and marks to indicate principal and secondary voices. Additionally I noticed that the reference scores I investigated contained two different glyphs for the accent, and it seemed a nice idea to provide both. Abraham provided these items as additional named glyphs. LilyPond doesn’t make use of them by default but it is possible to access such additional glyphs directly. Therefore I created markup commands and custom articulations and included them in an “arnold-extensions” stylesheet for convenient access. This extension stylesheet is made available through the syntax

\useNotationFont \with {
  extensions = ##t
}
Arnold

The new commands provided by Arnold extensions are: \arnoldWeakbeat, \arnoldStrongbeat, \arnoldVaraccent articulations, \hauptstimme, \nebenstimme, \endstimme markup commands, and finally \altAccent and \defAccent to permanently switch the accent glyph. You can see most of them in the following short (and slightly modified) excerpt from Arnold Schoenberg’s Wind Quintet op. 26:

Arnold Schönberg: Wind Quintet op. 26, beginning of second movement, oboe part (click to view PDF)

Arnold Schönberg “Bläserquintett|für Flöte, Oboe, Klarinette, Horn und Fagott|op. 26”, excerpt from oboe part, movement II (click to view PDF)
© Copyright 1925 by Universal Edition A.G., Wien/PH 230 www.universaledition.com

Such extensions are now available for Arnold, but I think this is an approach that can be built upon for other fonts. That way fonts can support additional features for their specific notation purpose, for example ancient or contemporary notation, musical analysis, or popular idioms. The nice thing about separating these as “extensions” is that it is completely separate from other stylesheets the user might select or create.

Anton Webern: Five Songs After Poems By Stefan George Opus 4

At the top of this article I wrote that it’s release date is not arbitrary. The motivation to publish it today is that the music of Anton Webern has passed into public domain last night. Therefore I want to take the opportunity to make some of his music publicly available today: The Five songs op. 4 after poems of Stefan George – which had been the initial challenge to develop Arnold for.

Original Edition (Click to enlarge)

Original Edition (Click to enlarge)

First page of our rendering (click to enlarge)

First page of our rendering (click to enlarge)

You may want to place the two pages side by side to see how close LilyPond already gets to the atmosphere of the original edition. This is not a finished score considered publication quality, though.

With the active assistance of Peter Crighton and Chris Yate (and help by discussion through several other people) I could prepare an edition of that cycle, entering and proofing the music and setting up the basic style sheet. However, it turned out that the music is extremely complicated to engrave, and therefore LilyPond obviously hits its limits of automatic engraving. This is not embarrassing once you start to realize how “hacky” the original edition actually is, but it will need more time to find solutions for all the challenges of the full score.

Therefore I do make the score publicly available today, but initially only in the form of a source code repository. When the score gets into a presentable state I will upload it to this post, but in the meantime I encourage anybody to join us and complete this first (legal) free edition of a Webern score as a real community effort.

by Urs Liska at January 01, 2016 07:00 PM

December 30, 2015

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] [ANN] Virtual MIDI Piano Keyboard (VMPK) 0.6.2 released

Virtual MIDI Piano Keyboard is a MIDI events generator and receiver. It
doesn't produce any sound by itself, but can be used to drive a MIDI
synthesizer (either hardware or software, internal or external). You can use
the computer's keyboard to play MIDI notes, and also the mouse. You can use
the Virtual MIDI Piano Keyboard to display the played MIDI notes from
another instrument or MIDI file player.
The precompiled packages include the GeneralUser GS SoundFont by S.Christian
Collins (http://www.schristiancollins.com/generaluser.php) ready to use
with the FluidSynth output driver (also included in these packages, providing
beautiful sounds out of the box).
Changes for v0.6.2:
* Fixes for Mac OSX input drivers
(provided by Drumstick 1.0.2 libraries)
* Fixed ticket #28: crash on exit
Compilation minimum requirements for all platforms: CMake 3.0, Qt 5.1 and
Drumstick 1.0 or later.
Please use the mailing list <vmpk-devel@lists.sourceforge.net> for questions
and comments. Thanks.
Copyright (C) 2008-2015, Pedro López-Cabanillas and others
License: GPL v3
More info
http://vmpk.sourceforge.net
Downloads
http://sourceforge.net/projects/vmpk/files/0.6.2
_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-announce mailing list
Linux-audio-announce@lists.linuxaudio.org
http://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-announce

by gmail.com at December 30, 2015 09:01 AM

[LAA] [ANN] Drumstick libraries 1.0.2 released

Drumstick is a set of MIDI libraries using C++/Qt5 idioms and style. Includes
a C++ wrapper around the ALSA library sequencer interface: ALSA sequencer
provides software support for MIDI technology on Linux. A complementary
library provides classes for processing SMF (Standard MIDI files: .MID/.KAR),
Cakewalk (.WRK), and Overture (.OVE) file formats. A multiplatform realtime
MIDI I/O library is also provided with ALSA, OSS, Windows, Mac OSX, Network
and FluidSynth direct output backends.

Changes for v1.0.2
* RT library: Fix for ticket #6 - Mac OSX MIDI Input

Compilation minimum requirements for all platforms: CMake 3.0 and Qt 5.1

Copyright (C) 2009-2015, Pedro Lopez-Cabanillas
License: GPL v2 or later

Project web site
http://sourceforge.net/projects/drumstick

Online documentation
http://drumstick.sourceforge.net/docs/

Downloads
http://sourceforge.net/projects/drumstick/files/1.0.2/
_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-announce mailing list
Linux-audio-announce@lists.linuxaudio.org
http://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-announce

by gmail.com at December 30, 2015 08:57 AM

December 29, 2015

rncbc.org

Qtractor 0.7.3 - A Tackier Gluon is out!

Hello there and again,

This time getting ready for the NYE. Prepare to party, the countdown has begun... but first, let there be just one cheesier announcement ;o)

Qtractor 0.7.3 (a tackier gluon) is released!

Everyone is strongly invited to upgrade. No excuses.

Qtractor is an audio/MIDI multi-track sequencer application written in C++ with the Qt framework. Target platform is Linux, where the Jack Audio Connection Kit (JACK) for audio and the Advanced Linux Sound Architecture (ALSA) for MIDI are the main infrastructures to evolve as a fairly-featured Linux desktop audio workstation GUI, specially dedicated to the personal home-studio.

Change-log (since last cheesy release):

  • Slight increase on the number of decimal digits for the plugin parameters while on the generic plugin properties dialog. Also applied to automation curve node value editing.
  • Unlimited slack is now in effect on editing over and beyond the current session or clip contents length, on both the main tracks and MIDI clip editor (piano-roll) views.
  • Ctrl+click and dragging the left or right edges of a clip will now make it spill over and replicate as many clip clones as it fits in the left or right horizontal extent.
  • Added View/Note Type and Value Type command menus to the MIDI clip editor (aka. piano-roll) which opens the possibility for discrete shortcuts to switching views eg. Note Velocity and Controller views (after a kind request by yubatake, thanks).
  • Fixed the conversion and/or override of MIDI clip offsets when moving and copy/pasting across tempo/time-signature changes.
  • Fixed MIDI file track/channel duration estimator, which was giving quite wrong and way too short reads.
  • Fixed a drag-and-drop bug over the main tracks view, when new tracks were being inserted at the top and not to the bottom as is normally indicated by the floating visual placeholder.
  • Fixed LV2UI_Resize handle from extension_data(LV2_UI__resize), now passing LV2UI_Handle in first argument to ui_resize(), as found correct and needed for resizable/scaleable LV2 UI's, most specially to ssj71's so called Infamous Plugins, thanks.

Enjoy && Happy New Year.

Flattr this

Website:

http://qtractor.sourceforge.net

Project page:

http://sourceforge.net/projects/qtractor

Downloads:

Wiki (on going, help wanted!):

http://sourceforge.net/p/qtractor/wiki/

License:

Qtractor is free, open-source Linux Audio software, distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL) version 2 or later.

Enjoy && Happy New Year.

by rncbc at December 29, 2015 08:00 PM

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

AVL Drumkits updated to version 1.0

Glen MacArthur, maintainer of AVLinux, has just announced version 1.0 of his AVL Drumkit samples, which come in both Hydrogen and SFZ formats.

AVLinux drumkits

by Conor at December 29, 2015 06:09 PM

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] Qtractor 0.7.3 - A Tackier Gluon is out!

Hello there and again,

This time getting ready for the NYE. Prepare to party, the countdown has
begun... but first, let there be just one cheesier announcement ;o)

Qtractor 0.7.3 (a tackier gluon) is released!

Everyone is strongly invited to upgrade. No excuses.

Qtractor [1] is an audio/MIDI multi-track sequencer application
written in C++ with the Qt framework [2]. Target platform is Linux,
where the Jack Audio Connection Kit (JACK [3]) for audio and the
Advanced Linux Sound Architecture (ALSA [4]) for MIDI are the main
infrastructures to evolve as a fairly-featured Linux desktop audio
workstation GUI, specially dedicated to the personal home-studio.

Change-log (since last cheesy release):
- Slight increase on the number of decimal digits for the plugin
parameters while on the generic plugin properties dialog. Also applied
to automation curve node value editing.
- Unlimited slack is now in effect on editing over and beyond the
current session or clip contents length, on both the main tracks and
MIDI clip editor (piano-roll) views.
- Ctrl+click and dragging the left or right edges of a clip will now
make it spill over and replicate as many clip clones as it fits in the
left or right horizontal extent.
- Added View/Note Type and Value Type command menus to the MIDI clip
editor (aka. piano-roll) which opens the possibility for discrete
shortcuts to switching views eg. Note Velocity and Controller views
(after a kind request by yubatake, thanks).
- Fixed the conversion and/or override of MIDI clip offsets when moving
and copy/pasting across tempo/time-signature changes.
- Fixed MIDI file track/channel duration estimator, which was giving
quite wrong and way too short reads.
- Fixed a drag-and-drop bug over the main tracks view, when new tracks
were being inserted at the top and not to the bottom as is normally
indicated by the floating visual placeholder.
- Fixed LV2UI_Resize handle from extension_data(LV2_UI__resize), now
passing LV2UI_Handle in first argument to ui_resize(), as found correct
and needed for resizable/scaleable LV2 UI's, most specially to ssj71's
so called Infamous Plugins, thanks.


Website:
http://qtractor.sourceforge.net

Project page:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/qtractor

Downloads:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/qtractor/files

- source tarball:
http://download.sf.net/qtractor/qtractor-0.7.3.tar.gz

- source package (openSUSE Tumbleweed):
http://download.sf.net/qtractor/qtractor-0.7.3-21.rncbc.suse.src.rpm

- binary packages (openSUSE Tumbleweed):
http://download.sf.net/qtractor/qtractor-0.7.3-21.rncbc.suse.i586.rpm
http://download.sf.net/qtractor/qtractor-0.7.3-21.rncbc.suse.x86_84.rpm

- wiki (on going, help wanted!):
http://sourceforge.net/p/qtractor/wiki/

Weblog (on going, upstream support):
http://www.rncbc.org

License:
Qtractor [1] is free, open-source Linux Audio [5] software,
distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL [6])
version 2 or later.


References:

[1] Qtractor - An audio/MIDI multi-track sequencer
http://qtractor.sourceforge.net

[2] Qt framework, C++ class library and tools for
cross-platform application and UI development
http://qt.io/

[3] JACK Audio Connection Kit
http://jackaudio.org

[4] ALSA, Advanced Linux Sound Architecture
http://www.alsa-project.org/

[5] Linux Audio consortium of libre software for audio-related work
http://linuxaudio.org

[6] GPL - GNU General Public License
http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/gpl.html


See also:
http://www.rncbc.org/drupal/node/989


Enjoy && Happy New Year.
--
rncbc aka. Rui Nuno Capela
_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-announce mailing list
Linux-audio-announce@lists.linuxaudio.org
http://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-announce

by rncbc.org at December 29, 2015 04:41 PM

[LAA] [ANN] Qtractor 0.7.3 - A Tackier Gluon is out!

Hello there and again,

This time getting ready for the NYE. Prepare to party, the countdown has
begun... but first, let there be just one cheesier announcement ;o)

Qtractor 0.7.3 (a tackier gluon) is released!

Everyone is strongly invited to upgrade. No excuses.

Qtractor [1] is an audio/MIDI multi-track sequencer application
written in C++ with the Qt framework [2]. Target platform is Linux,
where the Jack Audio Connection Kit (JACK [3]) for audio and the
Advanced Linux Sound Architecture (ALSA [4]) for MIDI are the main
infrastructures to evolve as a fairly-featured Linux desktop audio
workstation GUI, specially dedicated to the personal home-studio.

Change-log (since last cheesy release):
- Slight increase on the number of decimal digits for the plugin
parameters while on the generic plugin properties dialog. Also applied
to automation curve node value editing.
- Unlimited slack is now in effect on editing over and beyond the
current session or clip contents length, on both the main tracks and
MIDI clip editor (piano-roll) views.
- Ctrl+click and dragging the left or right edges of a clip will now
make it spill over and replicate as many clip clones as it fits in the
left or right horizontal extent.
- Added View/Note Type and Value Type command menus to the MIDI clip
editor (aka. piano-roll) which opens the possibility for discrete
shortcuts to switching views eg. Note Velocity and Controller views
(after a kind request by yubatake, thanks).
- Fixed the conversion and/or override of MIDI clip offsets when moving
and copy/pasting across tempo/time-signature changes.
- Fixed MIDI file track/channel duration estimator, which was giving
quite wrong and way too short reads.
- Fixed a drag-and-drop bug over the main tracks view, when new tracks
were being inserted at the top and not to the bottom as is normally
indicated by the floating visual placeholder.
- Fixed LV2UI_Resize handle from extension_data(LV2_UI__resize), now
passing LV2UI_Handle in first argument to ui_resize(), as found correct
and needed for resizable/scaleable LV2 UI's, most specially to ssj71's
so called Infamous Plugins, thanks.


Website:
http://qtractor.sourceforge.net

Project page:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/qtractor

Downloads:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/qtractor/files

- source tarball:
http://download.sf.net/qtractor/qtractor-0.7.3.tar.gz

- source package (openSUSE Tumbleweed):
http://download.sf.net/qtractor/qtractor-0.7.3-21.rncbc.suse.src.rpm

- binary packages (openSUSE Tumbleweed):
http://download.sf.net/qtractor/qtractor-0.7.3-21.rncbc.suse.i586.rpm
http://download.sf.net/qtractor/qtractor-0.7.3-21.rncbc.suse.x86_84.rpm

- wiki (on going, help wanted!):
http://sourceforge.net/p/qtractor/wiki/

Weblog (on going, upstream support):
http://www.rncbc.org

License:
Qtractor [1] is free, open-source Linux Audio [5] software,
distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL [6])
version 2 or later.


References:

[1] Qtractor - An audio/MIDI multi-track sequencer
http://qtractor.sourceforge.net

[2] Qt framework, C++ class library and tools for
cross-platform application and UI development
http://qt.io/

[3] JACK Audio Connection Kit
http://jackaudio.org

[4] ALSA, Advanced Linux Sound Architecture
http://www.alsa-project.org/

[5] Linux Audio consortium of libre software for audio-related work
http://linuxaudio.org

[6] GPL - GNU General Public License
http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/gpl.html


See also:
http://www.rncbc.org/drupal/node/989


Enjoy && Happy New Year.
--
rncbc aka. Rui Nuno Capela
_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-announce mailing list
Linux-audio-announce@lists.linuxaudio.org
http://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-announce

by rncbc.org at December 29, 2015 04:41 PM

[LAA] AVL Drumkits 1.0 - Changes and Updates

Hi,

Just wanted pass along an update the the AVL Drumkits which are now at 1.0.

Updates:

-Red Zep Kits get an improved Kick drum.
-All Kits gain a large 3rd Crash Cymbal on Key 60 (sampled from a Paiste
2002 22" crash).
This cymbal has a very distinctive dark tone and is a nice contrast to
the other crashes.
-All Kits gain a Maraca on Key 64 for percussion (sampled from actual
maracas not an egg shaker).
-All new hand percussion kit. This is for use with acoustic instruments
and includes Cajon,
Woodblock, Claves, Tambourine, Maraca, Handclaps and Fingersnaps.
NOTE! This is not percussion in the Afro-Cuban sense at all..
-Midnam files are now included for use with Ardour/Mixbus and any other
DAWs which support loading of midnam files.
-Updates are reflected in a Keymap PDF File.

Format Changes:

-Removed Soundfont2 versions, I don't think all of the SFZ formatting was
being incorporated into the Soundfonts correctly and the SFZ's sound
discernibly better, also I have limited time!
-Removed sf2/sfz Debian packages, I'm not convinced installing any Sound
libraries system-wide is really that useful, they seem to be better suited
to user's home folders or other drives with full user permissions.

Find them here: http://bandshed.net/avldrumkits/index.html

Glen

_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-announce mailing list
Linux-audio-announce@lists.linuxaudio.org
http://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-announce

by bandshed.net at December 29, 2015 04:09 AM

December 28, 2015

OpenAV

Web Downtime (now fixed)

Web Downtime (now fixed)

Hi all, A quick note that we’ve noticed the OpenAV server was not responding promptly, there was a ninja-style intermittent and strange problem… see up/down bar below. No fear – it should be fixed now! If you notice any downtime from now onwards, please email our webmaster: harryhaaren@gmail.com. Stay tuned for updates, and a happy holiday season! Read more →

by harry at December 28, 2015 04:32 PM

Linux – cdm createdigitalmusic

Play reverb roulette with this wild free u-he plug-in

Urs Heckmann just combined “reverb” with “experimental, possibly sonically unstable plug-in with unpredictable results.” And it’s free.

Urs – how did you know exactly what I wanted for Christmas?

protoverb

Protoverb is an “experimental” reverb from u-he built around the idea of modeling series of resonances and reflections in a room. In my play so far, I’ve found distinct memories echo clearly (“ghost echoes,” as the developers put it), while richer ambiences create strange, beautiful ringing sounds.

The reason reverbs generally aren’t built this way is that the results can be unexpected or even unpleasant – but that’s what makes this such fun. Even a single parameter can produce a broad range as you adjust wet/dry feedback. And by adjusting other settings, you can produce sounds ranging from artificial to realistic to … awful.

In fact, while this is a digital reverb in the conventional sense (a bunch of delays), it uses a combination of parallel, serial, and networked delays that turn it into an uncertainty mechanism.

That said, for a bit of creative sound design, I found I was consistently getting unexpected results I loved. For instance, here’s a ringing timbre I got out of a recording of some leafblowers humming around my parents’ Florida home on this holiday. (I might actually make a protoverb EP now, I’m getting so into this.)

At first blush, it looks like this is just a dumbed-down reverb with giant knobs. But it isn’t. That text field at the bottom is important:

To be precise, the small text box at the bottom contains two random entries. The first part depicts the network structure, strategies for a spatial layout and distribution of delay taps, strategies for finding useful delay lengths and so on. The second part is a seed for a pseudo-random number generator which is used to find various parameters, such as average delay length, which prime number to chose (if any) and so on. This text can either be edited by double click, or both parts can be independently randomized with the two random buttons below.

Say what?

Editing the number itself is something you can control. Beyond that, if you like just hitting “I feel lucky” with your reverb and having no idea what will happen next, you’ve come to the right place. It’s magic.

Randomize that string, and you get … well, something different. If you like it, hit save. If you don’t, delete. I do actually plan to build a little collection of these.

In fact, u-he have made this free precisely with the hope of people sharing their results. A ‘send’ button uploads your favorites to the u-he mothership to see if they can make sense of this strange delay network by crowd-sourcing the results. It’s like the protein folding or SETI experiments, but for reverb.

You can grab this now for Mac (AAX, AU, VST2), Windows (AAX, VST2), and Linux (VST2 only unfortunately, but no complaints).

http://www.u-he.com/cms/179-protoverb

Here’s a walkthrough by the wonderful Bedroom Producers’ Blog:

From Suono & Computer, there’s yet another play with the plug-in (and now you’re seeing how varied the results can be).

Let us know if you produce anything interesting!

The post Play reverb roulette with this wild free u-he plug-in appeared first on cdm createdigitalmusic.

by Peter Kirn at December 28, 2015 02:29 PM

December 27, 2015

Scores of Beauty

“Musicians prefer LilyPond scores, study finds“

With these words merited community member Francisco Vila announced the completion of his PhD thesis, for which we would like to congratulate him heartily. It seems to be an interesting topic with – from our perspective – pleasant results.

The – Spanish – thesis is available from http://paconet.org/tesis/tesis.pdf, and it contains an English abstract which we cite for your convenience:

Based on the observations that use of sheet music is paramount in the field of music education, and that free software has characteristics that make it very interesting for use in all kinds of learning activities, our first study describes from multiple points of view a free software project dedicated to music typography. Over a span of 18 years, data about development of the project are analyzed from the whole registered history of its source code. Several visualization and modeling techniques suggest that such a system offers a fairly high level of robustness against deep changes in the composition of the developers’ team.

In our second study, a set of scores made with this program were subject to a custom-made, comparative test through data collected from 106 participating musicians, and at the same time their consumption patterns of musical scores are analyzed. The survey questionnaire and the score models used are validated by a team of experts. A test essay is made and timewise stability is checked by means of the test/retest method. Results show that musicians seem to prefer, in a statistically significant way, music scores made with a program which happens to be freely available for download. We conclude that such a solution makes a valid option for education and professional uses.

Both studies are leaded by a complete bibliographic compendium and a theoretical and historical framework about free software and music typesetting. Further and deeper studies are claimed to be done, as only the surface of the tool has started to show its full potential.

This looks really nice, but I had one open question left: “Musicians prefer LilyPond over what?” Francisco’s answer was pretty strict: “To the same music typeset by other means”.

Obviously they went to great lengths realizing a double-blind study. They prepared ten different (types of) scores, taking an existing (usually professional) engraving and a new LilyPond score, ensuring they were identical in as many respects as possible: paper color, page layout, staff size, background noise etc. This similarity was scrupulously evaluated by experienced musicians before the actual tests were made and the probands were presented pairs of randomly arranged scores. Music types were: a cello part, a piano sonata, a lied, an SATB choral piece, a drumset exercise, a leadsheet, a guitar piece, a string quartet, a chamber music for piano trio, and a full orchestra page, and for two ‘control’ cases the same score was presented twice.

Not all comparisons clearly showed LilyPond as the winner, and in one case – the guitar piece – it actually was the loser. Nevertheless, the average result was clearly favorable to LilyPond scores in a blind experiment where musicians did not know which one was LilyPond-made. I think this gives a clear body of evidence to a ‘truth’ I have felt for a long time (and discussed just recently): LilyPond’s pursuit of traditional aesthetics and craftsmanship simply works.

If you like you may read through the detailed description Francisco gave me or have a look at the photo album with nice impressions.

by Urs Liska at December 27, 2015 09:15 AM

December 26, 2015

open-source – cdm createdigitalmusic

Call for participants: a Hacklab to change perspectives, in Belgium

In the past weeks, I’ve had the good fortune to talk to astronauts and aeronautical engineers, to artists in residence in space centers (with ESA) and aboard “vomet comet” airplane microgravity experiments (in Russia).

A common theme has emerged. Just as images from space once transformed our perception, the next frontier is sound.

From spatial sound to works responding to spaceflight, drones, and aeronautics, there’s a chance to change the way we hear and imagine. And so, after we start February at Berlin’s CTM Festival imagining future rituals, we’ll move later in the month to Leuven, Belgium to explore the heard place. You’re invited.

CDM is invited to STUK Kunstencentrum as part of the spectacular-looking Artefact Festival. If you join me and co-facilitator Darsha Hewitt (herself a Hacklab veteran, participant and facilitator alike), you’ll get to attend that festival, too. Lorenzo Senni, William Basinski, Powell, and Christina Vantzou are among some of my favorites on the lineup, and more are coming.

AMF 2016 trailer 4 from STUK Leuven on Vimeo.

Those of you who know CDM Hacklabs know they’re not another overnight hack-a-thon for coders. We want musicians and dancers. And now, we get some unique new additions – like aeronautical engineers (a local program is collaborating), and people interested in surveillance.

So, help us spread the word. And while you are hopefully getting some days over the holidays to be lazy, do this one thing – as a gift to yourself – that could give back come the bland days of February.

And stay tuned to CDM wherever you are, as we bring back whatever happens in Leuven.

Details:
MUSICMAKERS HACKLAB ! CALL FOR PARTICIPANTS ! [STUK]

Deadline: 5 January

Application form [direct link]

sky

Photos by the author…

The post Call for participants: a Hacklab to change perspectives, in Belgium appeared first on cdm createdigitalmusic.

by Peter Kirn at December 26, 2015 06:01 PM

December 24, 2015

Recent changes to blog

Popsicle Pickup along with Guitarix

I made a simple pickup to fit my modified baritone guitar (tuned it in fifths, and adjusted it accordingly).
My wife made me promise that it would be a "non-destructive" pickup, so no drilling allowed.

I came up with this:
Popsicle low Z pickup.
I sandwiched two 25x5x3mm strong magnets between two popsicle sticks. I made a single loop around the magnets using some electric wire which I had lying around, keeping it in place with two tie wraps. I coupled the single loop with a 1:500 current transformer (Talema AS-104). Finally I soldered a microphone cable to the transformer.
The result is a low Z pickup with a balanced output suitable for a microphone input.
The distance between the two sticks is just a bit wider than the thickness of the top, with the use of two screws the pickup is clamped in the soundhole.

I've made two short soundclips, one with only a wee bit of reverb,


and a second one with the highs rolled off around 2kHz.

I'm still pondering over a better way to retain the cable (besides using black tape instead of grey ;-) )

Merry Christmas!

Hans

by Broomy at December 24, 2015 07:56 PM

OSM podcast

GStreamer News

GStreamer Core, Plugins, RTSP Server, Editing Services, Python 1.7.1 unstable release

The GStreamer team is pleased to announce the first release of the unstable 1.7 release series. The 1.7 release series is adding new features on top of the 1.0, 1.2, 1.4 and 1.6 series and is part of the API and ABI-stable 1.x release series of the GStreamer multimedia framework. The unstable 1.7 release series will lead to the stable 1.8 release series in the next weeks. Any newly added API can still change until that point.

Binaries for Android, iOS, Mac OS X and Windows will be provided separately during the unstable 1.7 release series.

Check out the release notes for GStreamer core, gst-plugins-base, gst-plugins-good, gst-plugins-ugly, gst-plugins-bad, gst-libav, gst-rtsp-server, gst-python, or gst-editing-services, or download tarballs for gstreamer, gst-plugins-base, gst-plugins-good, gst-plugins-ugly, gst-plugins-bad, gst-libav, gst-rtsp-server, gst-python, or gst-editing-services.

December 24, 2015 04:00 PM

GStreamer Core, Plugins, RTSP Server, Editing Services, Python 1.6.2 stable release (binaries)

Pre-built binary images of the 1.6.2 stable release of GStreamer are now available for Windows 32/64-bit, iOS and Mac OS X and Android.

The builds are available for download from: Android, iOS, Mac OS X and Windows.

December 24, 2015 08:00 AM

December 22, 2015

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] ANN: pd-l2ork version 20151219 now available

Apologies for x-posting,

This holiday release brings you:

*-legacy flag that provides 100% backwards compatibility with iemgui
objects
*gfsm library
*added support for $0 functionality in messages
*support for Intel Haswell and Skylake CPUs
*ability to use # in labels
*ability to use multiple $n arguments in labels
*fixed bug in keyboard autorepeat and cleaned up [key] object to support
autorepeat filtering
*added autotune~ external and its K12 module
*synced cyclone and iem libraries
*other small fixes and cosmetic improvements

For a raw (unedited) changelog and a more detailed overview, please visit:
https://puredata.info/downloads/Pd-L2Ork/releases/20151219

To download pd-l2ork:
*http://l2ork.music.vt.edu/main/make-your-own-l2ork/software/
<*">http://l2ork.music.vt.edu/main/make-your-own-l2ork/software/>*

NB: Currently only Ubuntu 15.10 64bit build is available, with 32bit and
Raspberry Pi builds forthcoming.

About Pd-L2Ork
Pd-L2Ork is a fork of the ubiquitous Pure-Data focusing on improved user
interface, expanded collection of externals, and an advanced SVG-enabled
graphical front-end. Originally it was introduced as the core
infrastructure for the Linux Laptop Orchestra (L2Ork http://l2ork
.icat.vt.edu), and has since expanded to include K-12 learning module with
a unique learning environment offering adaptable granularity that has been
utilized in over dozen maker workshops and initiatives, including the
Raspberry Pi Orchestra program for middle school children introduced in the
summer 2014. Today, pd-l2ork is being developed by a growing number of
international collaborators and contributors.

For additional info L2Ork and pd-l2ork:
http://l2ork.music.vt.edu

Best,

--
Ivica Ico Bukvic, D.M.A.
Associate Professor
Computer Music
ICAT Senior Fellow
Director -- DISIS, L2Ork
Virginia Tech
School of Performing Arts – 0141
Blacksburg, VA 24061
(540) 231-6139
ico@vt.edu
www.performingarts.vt.edu
disis.icat.vt.edu
l2ork.icat.vt.edu
ico.bukvic.net

by vt.edu at December 22, 2015 03:57 PM

December 16, 2015

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

December 15, 2015

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] MMA 15.12

A stable release, version 15.12, of MMA--Musical MIDI Accompaniment
is available for downloading. In addition to a number of bug fixes
and optimizations, MMA now features:

- Works with Python 2.7 or 3.x
- Lots of minor bug fixes
- Added RPITCH for random "mistakes"
- Added SUBROUTINES
- Added FretNoise option for Plectrum tracks
- Much better keysignature handling
- A "whole wack" of library files which were missing are now in the distro
- Other minor enhancements

Please read the file text/CHANGES-15 for a complete list of changes.

MMA is a accompaniment generator -- it creates midi tracks
for a soloist to perform with. User supplied files contain
pattern selections, chords, and MMA directives. For full details
please visit:

http://www.mellowood.ca/mma/

If you have any questions or comments, please send
them to: bob@mellowood.ca



--
**** Listen to my FREE CD at http://www.mellowood.ca/music/cedars ****
Bob van der Poel ** Wynndel, British Columbia, CANADA **
EMAIL: bob@mellowood.ca
WWW: http://www.mellowood.ca

by mellowood.ca at December 15, 2015 11:23 PM

[LAA] Infamous Plugins v0.2.0 now released!

Bail has been paid! The come what may places release is now live!

https://github.com/ssj71/infamousPlugins/releases

Many many thanks to all donors who helped make this happen!

Now go, get creative!

_Spencer
http://ssj71.github.io/infamousPlugins

by gmail.com at December 15, 2015 09:46 PM

December 14, 2015

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

Yoshimi LV2 plugin

Yoshimi, the ZynAddSubFX fork is now available not only as a standalone application, but also as an LV2 plugin.

It has not yet been released as a package, but according to developer Will Godfrey, should make it for the next Ubuntu release.

by Philip Yassin at December 14, 2015 06:47 PM

GStreamer News

GStreamer Core, Plugins, RTSP Server, Editing Services, Python 1.6.2 stable release

The GStreamer team is proud to announce the second bugfix release in the stable 1.6 release series of your favourite cross-platform multimedia framework!

This release only contains bugfixes and it is safe to update from 1.6.0 and 1.6.1. For a full list of bugfixes see Bugzilla.

See http://gstreamer.freedesktop.org/releases/1.6/ for the full release notes.

Binaries for Android, iOS, Mac OS X and Windows will be provided separately by the GStreamer project.

Check out the release notes for GStreamer core, gst-plugins-base, gst-plugins-good, gst-plugins-ugly, gst-plugins-bad, gst-libav, gst-rtsp-server, gst-python, or gst-editing-services, or download tarballs for gstreamer, gst-plugins-base, gst-plugins-good, gst-plugins-ugly, gst-plugins-bad, gst-libav, gst-rtsp-server, gst-python, or gst-editing-services.

December 14, 2015 04:00 PM

December 12, 2015

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

December 2015 - Interviews, Qtractor and Supercollider tutorials and Linux audio news

Our newsletter for December is now sent to our subscribers. If you have not yet subscribed, you can do that from our start page.

You can also read the latest issue online. In it you will find:

  • 'LMP Asks' interviews with Babis Kouvalis and Scott Petersen
  • Qtractor and Supercollider tutorials
  • New software release announcements

and more!

by admin at December 12, 2015 11:59 PM

December 11, 2015

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] WAC 2016 - registration now open

Registration for WAC 2016 is now open.
To register, please visit .">http://webaudio.gatech.edu<http://webaudio.gatech.edu/>.

The 2nd Web Audio Conference (WAC) will be held April 4-6, 2016 at Georgia Tech in Atlanta. WAC is an international conference dedicated to web audio technologies and applications. The conference addresses research, development, design, and standards concerned with emerging audio-related web technologies such as Web Audio API, Web RTC, WebSockets and Javascript. WAC welcomes industry engineers, R&D scientists, academic researchers, artists, and students from fields such as web development, music technology, computer music, and audio applications. The first Web Audio Conference was held in January 2015 at IRCAM and Mozilla in Paris, France. WAC 2016 is sponsored by the Georgia Tech College of Architecture and by Dolby.

The keynote speakers for WAC 2016 are Helen Thorington and Frank Melchior. The conference will feature over 75 papers, posters, talks, demos, artworks, and musical performances, a plenary session with the W3C working group on the Web Audio API, a hack session, tutorials, and related activities.

The conference takes place at Georgia Tech, a major research university located in midtown Atlanta, with convenient access from Hartsfield-Jackson Airport (the busiest passenger airport in the world). The conference venue, Georgia Tech's Academy of Medicine, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and houses the chandelier seen in the movie "Gone with the Wind." The venue is a short walk to the Georgia Tech campus, dining, shopping, nightlife, the conference hotel, and the city's main subway line.

Registration rates are as follows:
Early Bird Registration (by February 15th):
$250 regular registration
$100 student registration

Late Registration (after February 15th):
$400 regular registration
$200 student registration

For all accepted papers, posters, talks, demos, artworks, and performances, at least one author must register for and attend the conference.

TRAVEL GRANT PROGRAM
The WAC 2016 organizing committee plans to award a small number of travel and registration grants. The grants will waive registration fees and cover a portion of travel expenses for recipients.

To be eligible for consideration for a travel grant, you must:
- have a paper, poster, talk, demo, artwork, and/or performance accepted for presentation at WAC 2016
- belong to a population that is underrepresented in the WAC community
- not have attended WAC 2015
- not have financial support from your institution to attend WAC 2016

To apply for a travel grant, write a one-page letter of application that confirms your eligibility, describes how attendance at WAC 2016 will be of benefit to you and to any communities and/or organizations you are involved in, and includes your contact information and origin city for travel.

Travel grant applications are due by *February 1st, 2016* and should be sent as a PDF attachment to webaudio@gatech.edu.

by surrey.ac.uk at December 11, 2015 05:49 PM

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

Drumgizmo drumkit family sees new member

Drumgizmo user, Sardonicus, has recently released an eight channel drumkit for Drumgizmo called 'ShittyKit'. Shitty by name, not so shitty by nature, this is Drumgizmo's first ever user created drumkit.

This kit is a Stagg Gia drumkit with the following instrument channels -

  • Ch 1: Kick
  • Ch 2: Snare
  • Ch 3: 12” Tom
  • Ch 4: 14” Floor tom
  • Ch 5 and 6: Overheads
  • Ch 7 and 8: Room

by Conor at December 11, 2015 10:39 AM

December 10, 2015

rncbc.org

Qtractor 0.7.2 - The Tacky Gluon beta release

Season greetings to y'all,

As cheesy as it might go, as a must already,

Qtractor 0.7.2 (tacky gluon beta) is out!

Quite frankly, there's nothing really stopping you from an upgrade or rather update to taste! :)

Qtractor is an audio/MIDI multi-track sequencer application written in C++ with the Qt framework. Target platform is Linux, where the Jack Audio Connection Kit (JACK) for audio and the Advanced Linux Sound Architecture (ALSA) for MIDI are the main infrastructures to evolve as a fairly-featured Linux desktop audio workstation GUI, specially dedicated to the personal home-studio.

Major highlights for this dot release are:

  • MIDI Track/Instrument bank/programs menu (NEW)
  • VST plug-ins preset/bank (FXP/FXB) files support (NEW)
  • Duplicate track menu command (NEW)
  • XRUN status bar indicator (NEW)

And, of course, Qtractor is now built to Qt5 as per configure default.

Hope you enjoy.

Flattr this

Website:

http://qtractor.sourceforge.net

Project page:

http://sourceforge.net/projects/qtractor

Downloads:

Wiki (help wanted!):

http://sourceforge.net/p/qtractor/wiki/

License:

Qtractor is free, open-source Linux Audio software, distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL) version 2 or later.

Change-log:

  • Yet another audio/MIDI time drift correction fix, now giving it some slack while turnaround looping on tempo changes.
  • Prevent x11extras module from use on non-X11/Unix platforms.
  • MIDI Track/Instrument cascading pop-up menus have been added, to main and MIDI clip editor windows.
  • VST Plugin preset/bank files support (FXB/FXP) is now being integrated to the generic Plugin/Properties widget dialog.
  • Added new Track/Duplicate menu command.
  • Added simple XRUN red indicator to status bar.
  • Make sure program change/presets are not selected on possibly multi-timbral instrument plugins when inserted on a MIDI bus.
  • Prefer Qt5 over Qt4 by default with configure script.
  • Fixed a potential crash-bug on first enabling either once the audio or MIDI metronomes.

Hope you enjoy && have fun.

by rncbc at December 10, 2015 08:00 PM

Scores of Beauty

Reveries of a Solitary Music Typographer: about November 2.0

A brief overview of digital music font design

Unlike designers of (digital) text fonts, music font designers historically were not restricted by standards and had great freedom, which has been both a blessing and a curse. While there was some common sense about what the kernel of music symbols should be (clefs, noteheads, accidentals, etc.), the actual position of characters in the font, their naming (though there was generally none provided), and the addition of rarer symbols beyond the basic set was left up to the designer’s imagination and to some specific requirements of the target music notation software.

november2_strip1

Things are changing drastically with SMuFL, a font standardisation effort initiated by Daniel Spreadbury from Steinberg and now hosted at W3C in a welcome “joint venture” with MusicXML. This addresses issues of symbol position, naming and repertoire in a universal way, the idea being a world where fonts can be used in different scoring applications – just as everybody expects text fonts to be usable in any text processor or layout program. SMuFL is a great source of inspiration for the designer – surely one of its benefits – but it also imposes new constraints and requirements, and leads to a more demanding design workflow.

November 1.0 within the evolution of music fonts

In 1998 I designed November, an alternative music font, specifically for Finale. It had a distinctive “vivid” design and its repertoire of 330 characters, spread over two font files, ranging through historical periods spanning the Renaissance to the 20th century avant-garde, was considered large at that time (about twice as big as Sonata, for instance). Before SMuFL, the extension of November’s repertoire had often been considered, but, because Finale or Sibelius were using some ASCII-based map for music symbols (i.e. not Unicode, as the Unicode Music Symbols, a technological failure, had never been adopted), it would have most likely led to the multiplication of font files and more “character map anarchy”, as had occurred with, for example, Opus (Sibelius) or Maestro (Finale) ; consequently only small updates had been made over the years.

Then I regarded the emergence of SMuFL in 2013 as a great opportunity for November to make a bigger jump: one single font file with a greatly extended range of characters, wrapped in OpenType, and complying with a new standard.

strip_many_glyphs

That said, by switching to SMuFL, the font designer, who generally is a single individual, must be ready to face the temptation of adding more and more symbols, making the development process potentially much longer. And not only must the designer deal with thousands of vectors and points, but also to some extent he or she must turn into a programmer – but this won’t come as a surprise to the readers of this blog, who, as LilyPond users, have code lines in their blood, intimately mingled with the music itself. Python scripting, for instance, can be a great ally for generating the required metadata automatically; this was used extensively for the November 2.0 project. For SMuFL-scaled font projects, it is impractical to create those metadata manually, and, to make the design workflow even better, one can invent sophisticated tools, for instance to compare the font being crafted with the reference font, Bravura.

All of these considerations change the font development workflow deeply and, for fonts with over 1000 characters, you most likely want more automation in order to keep your hand and mind as free as possible.

November 2.0: a SMuFL-compliant font project

November 2.0, a multi-target commercial product released in February 2015, has now over 1200 characters, with 80% of them coming from the SMuFL specifications, and is the first commercially-released font to comply with SMuFL. Although it includes a much broader symbol range and many new features, the 2.0 version is still “in tune” with the design spirit of the font’s 1998 inception.

While the SMuFL standard itself has been quickly emerging (with Steinberg’s work-in-progress on a new scoring application in the background), existing notation software such as Finale, Sibelius or LilyPond follow at a somewhat slower pace.
At the present time, though this is likely forthcoming, no currently available notation software officially supports SMuFL in an open fashion (MuseScore seems to be SMuFL compliant, but sadly the choice of available font is by-design hard-wired). Therefore, in the short- to medium-term, a SMuFL-compliant font like November 2.0 must still be packaged specifically for each notation program. The SMuFL metadata, for instance, is currently not consumed at all by any of the major existing applications (including Finale, Sibelius, and LilyPond), and idiosyncratic component files must be supplied along with the font in order to ensure a smooth user experience.

Sheherazade_november2.0
   Ravel – Shérérazade, engraved in LilyPond using November 2.0

Sheherazade_lilypond_emmentaler
   The same example engraved with Emmentaler

November 2.0 is distributed as a single downloadable archive containing installers for Mac, Windows & Linux, targeting Finale, Sibelius, and of course LilyPond.
The default installation detects any versions of the aforementioned notation programs, and installs the right files at the right locations. November 2.0 also includes a comprehensive 200-page pdf documentation in English and German (French is in progress…)

Using November 2.0 in LilyPond

So how specifically does November 2.0 comply with LilyPond? In LilyPond we know that the font paradigm is similar to LaTeX: the Emmentaler font (and all its style variations: Feta, Parmesan, etc.) is constructed at compile time from meta font data, resulting in a single OpenType font family, mapped onto a specific character table. Comparing with Maestro or Opus, Emmentaler has had – for years – the advantage of being Unicode-based, addressing the problem of a unified font its own way. In order to use November 2.0 in LilyPond, I have followed the steps of Nathan Ho and Joram Berger. And, sharing with me the obsession for font variety and glyph “vivid” details, Abraham Lee has been of a great help, too.

So once November 2.0 is installed, switching is fairly easy as it only requires

\include "november2.ly"

at the beginning of the music file.

For a local switch to November 2.0, you may also use:

\novemberOn
% ... music ...
\novemberOff

within the music code.

Under the hood, we have some special ‘snippet’ component files making the use of November 2.0 within the LilyPond environment as smooth as possible. You generally don’t want to bother with these files, but, as an example and just for the sake of curiosity, here is how the stem tremolo is finely taken care of:

#(define-public (november-tremolo grob)
   (let* ((stem-grob (ly:grob-parent grob X))
          (dura-log (ly:grob-property stem-grob 'duration-log))
          (flag-count (ly:grob-property grob 'flag-count))
          (dir (ly:grob-property stem-grob 'direction))
          (adj (cond ((<= dura-log 0) -0.45)
                     ((<= dura-log 2) (+ (* 0.3 flag-count) -0.3))
                     (else 0.5)))
          (vshift (if (> dir 0) (- 0 adj) adj))
          (tremolo-name (string-append "tremolo" (number->string flag-count))))
     (grob-interpret-markup grob
        (markup #:raise vshift #:novemberglyph tremolo-name))))

That said, while I could cover most of the notational aspects, there are still rare areas that are bit of a mystery to me, such as trill wiggles (wavy lines). Having looked into LilyPond’s code, they seem to be hard wired and I would advocate for LilyPond to provide easier (or, simply, possible) ways to overload those, through Scheme.

Meanwhile, the current compatibility of November 2.0 with LilyPond is fairly good. And more generally I hope that the claim of SMuFL-compliance for a rather popular music font, ranging across the major notation programs, can potentially help serve as an impetus for the developers of music notation software to support SMuFL more quickly and more comprehensively.
And I also believe that such a multi-target and SMuFL-compatible project may have the virtue of making the “vs.” reflex somehow irrelevant (Finale vs. Sibelius vs. LilyPond, free- vs. pay-ware, text- or GUI-based and so on).
In fact, whether we use music notation tools for our own purpose or under specific professional constraints, the access to style variety – as in text processing – should be left wide open, and graphic beauty should never be compromised.

More links:

Many thanks to Urs Liska, Abraham Lee, Nathan Ho and Joram Berger.

by Robert Piéchaud at December 10, 2015 06:51 PM

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

Infamous Plugins v0.2.0 pre-announcement

Spencer Jackson has just made a pre-announcement about the release of Infamous Plugins v0.2.0. As you may remember, Spencer uses a donate system whereby he initially releases the plugins DSP code, with donations thereafter pushing forward the release date for the plugins in all their GUI glory. Infamous plugins aim to "fill some holes, supplying non-existing plugins for linux audio".

by Conor at December 10, 2015 12:34 PM

digital audio hacks – Hackaday

Audio Streaming on the Cheap With an RPi Zero

The minuscule size of the Raspberry Pi Zero makes it perfect for hacks where size is a factor. For example, a small, standalone device for getting streaming audio into your speakers. The RPi Zero doesn’t have an audio output on board, so PolyVection paired it up with their PlainDAC to build a minimal audio streaming device.

Their build uses a few lines from the GPIO header to drive an I2S digital to analog converter. The DAC is a PCM5142 from Texas Instruments that provides high quality sound output, and contains a built in programmable DSP.

The hardware fits into a 3D printed case, coming in at 68 mm by 48 mm. There’s no WiFi inside, but this can be added with an external USB device for wireless streaming. The DAC used is supported by the Linux kernel, so a simple configuration is all that’s needed to pipe audio out.

Once you have a device like this assembled, you can install a server like Music Player Daemon to remotely control the device and cue up internet radio channels.


Filed under: digital audio hacks, Raspberry Pi

by Eric Evenchick at December 10, 2015 12:01 PM

December 09, 2015

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] Infamous Plugins V0.2.0 The Come What May Places Release Pre-Announce

Along the dusty road into the small western town, the infamous gang
approaches. They ride up, bringing along the usual uneasy feeling. What
trouble will it be this time? It's soon apparent that in addition to sundry
bugfixes and improving tweaks among the group, a new brother has joined the
bandits...

the infamous lushlife!
https://youtu.be/7-jbAm7YU5c

This fully featured Artificial Double Tracker (ADT) plugin has up to 6
channels of doubling, each with controllable detuning, delay, gain,
panning, and 2 lfos (per channel). It can do everything from thin beatle
effects to lush choruses. To learn more go to
http://ssj71.github.io/infamousPlugins/

But wait, this plugin cannot fully maraude with the others; the GUI is
being held for ransom! Its sentence is 50 days, but you could pitch in for
an early bail. Every $2 donated will move the release up 1 day. The plugin
itsself is in the releases section ready to download and try, but for the
GUI, you have to donate, or just wait. All source code will be released by
28 January 2016, unless donations buy it down to an earlier date.

Also I'll accept bartering for donations. Presets, documentation, demos,
videos, songs, ANYTHING for any project that builds up the linux audio
community can be used. Contact me and tell me what you'll do and we'll work
out a "value" for how many days I'll knock off.

One additional point of note regarding the lushlife GUI, the host generated
UI allows you to go to very extreme values (2 octaves up or down!), whereas
the GUI limits it to the more useful (and natural sounding) middle ground.
This way the GUI provides better resolution for tweaking in the critical
regions.

Check them out at http://ssj71.github.io/infamousPlugins
For more info about donations and the GUI release go to
http://ssj71.github.io/infamousPlugins/donate.html

Enjoy!
_Spencer (ssj71)

by gmail.com at December 09, 2015 10:36 PM

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

LMP Asks #15: An interview with Scott Petersen

This month LMP talked to Scott Petersen, SoundCollider programmer, teacher, composer and maker enthusiast.

Scott Petersen

Hi Scott! Thank you for taking the time to talk with us. Could you tell us a little about who you are?

by admin at December 09, 2015 06:38 PM

December 08, 2015

open-source – cdm createdigitalmusic

Building instruments, making future rituals in Berlin (open call)

hacklab2015_2

Culture can be a different construction in our inter-connected age. We can draw on traditions from a distant past – or imagine a distant future. We can more easily connect with the people around us, or the people on the other corner of the world.

So, as I host CDM’s fourth Hacklab with CTM Festival in Berlin, we’re pairing our participants with radical instrument builders to invent new musical rituals. Ewa Justka (born Poland, based in London) co-hosts and guest artists like Indonesian avant-garde Wukir Suryadi are along for another installment of this open, collaborative lab – and there’s still time to apply.

wukirsketch

Wukir is not like anyone we’ve worked with before – an avant-garde artist and instrument maker who has cross-bred new experimental concepts with folk tradition. (But that for me is perfectly connected to Yogyakarta’s scene.) He’s done everything from turn a museum’s collection of instruments into new performances to play Berghain.

One representative performance:

More:
http://theinstrumentbuildersproject.com/wukir-suryadi/

Ewa Justka joins as the fourth co-facilitator – and like the previous three (Leslie García, Darsha Hewitt, and Derek Holzer) she’s an experienced educator and inventor. (Leslie, Darsha, and Ewa are all also “graduates” of the program we’ve done with CTM; Derek from before I came to Berlin.)

She creates wild performances like this:

Then there’s Gamut Ensemble, the combination of Marion Wörle and Maciej Sledziecki. They’ll certainly be a topic for another post, but by way of a tease, they’re producing hybrids of robots and traditional instruments, with results that seem simultaneously antique and science fiction:

If you are able to get yourself to Berlin first week of February, we have an open call.

Deadline is end of this week. But don’t sweat it – we create a collaborative environment to produce something new, so the application is as simple as telling us about yourself. We have a limited number of spots, but if we are able to take you, you’ll get some perks – like a CTM pass. Details:

11 December Deadline:
Call for Participants – MusicMakers Hacklab [CTM Festival]

We’ll be sharing the results of these outcomes, too.

I can’t wait. That week of CTM is like music nerd Christmas.

The post Building instruments, making future rituals in Berlin (open call) appeared first on cdm createdigitalmusic.

by Peter Kirn at December 08, 2015 05:18 PM

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

Qtractor QuickStart

Introduction

Qtractor can handle your MIDI and Audio tracks with sample-perfect precision, present you with a state of the art, industry standard mixer, complete with complex routing and effects, and allow you to record, mix and master your song all the way to the final bounce to a standard stereo recording tool. But this is not what we are going to do today.

by Philip Yassin at December 08, 2015 01:58 PM

December 07, 2015

Linux – cdm createdigitalmusic

Push 2 hardware now works in Bitwig – including on Linux

pushvspush

There may be an Ableton logo splashed on it and integration designed specifically for Live. But one of the nice things about Ableton’s Push and Push 2 hardware are that, at their core, they’re open. Everything sends and receives standard MIDI messages. As we’ve seen, even the display is hackable. And that is admirable not only from an engineering standpoint, but because it means the hardware you invest in has a life beyond just specific drivers and software updates.

Now, that extends even to rival software Bitwig Studio – which means you can even use a Push 2 on Linux.

News broke over the weekend that the Push4Bitwig script by Jürgen Moßgraber (aka “moss”) supports both the new Push hardware and existing Push hardware. Here’s a tutorial on how to set it up:

And more discussion on the forum KVR:
Push4Bitwig [kvraudio]

It’s also worth noting that this is what happens when you open stuff up – users surprise you with their own ideas. This isn’t Bitwig support, and as someone griped recently here on CDM comments, Ableton didn’t even document their MIDI implementation. It’s just intrepid, relentless users. And I think at the end of the day, that makes both Bitwig (for providing this kind of scripting) and Ableton (for adhering to standards rather than, cough, proprietary implementations) look better.

I know there’s some fear associated with this for manufacturers – heck, as a manufacturer myself, I know how serious support obligations can be. But I think there are real rewards when you can overcome some of those fears.

And if you use this – especially if any of you are braving Linux – we’d love to hear how.

The post Push 2 hardware now works in Bitwig – including on Linux appeared first on cdm createdigitalmusic.

by Peter Kirn at December 07, 2015 12:19 PM

December 06, 2015

Scores of Beauty

Optical Spacing (The Swan, Part 2)

Last week I wrote about a new edition of Saint-Saëns’ famous “Swan” for which I prepared a new piano arrangement. In the closing of the article I showed the exception to the rule, namely an issue where LilyPond did not serve me well right from the start, with this example of particularly ugly horizontal spacing:

Surprisingly irregular default spacing (click to enlarge)

Surprisingly irregular default spacing (click to enlarge)

Of course there is a piano part in addition to that cello line, but nevertheless it seemed more than strange that LilyPond should be doing that badly, and I had to find a solution (and more urgently, a cause) for the issue. As it turned out, my spacing issue is an ugly side-effect of a major LilyPond strength: optical spacing. Today I will show you in some detail what this is about – and why it is a limitation in this special case.

Optical Spacing

LilyPond works very hard to avoid the mechanical appearance of many computer-engraved scores, actually this has been of the main incentives to create the program in the first place. One of the “secrets” of LilyPond’s outstanding readability and “vintage” appearance is the technique of optical spacing. The horizontal position of notes (and other items) is not only calculated through mathematical proportions of their rhythmic value, instead other factors such as the actual outline with remaining whitespace or the perceived weight of objects are taken into account as well.

Looking closely at the right hand of the piano one can see that the semiquavers are spaced out technically irregularly (consider the absolute distance between adjacent stems) but appearing extremely balanced:

Technically irregular semiquavers (click to enlarge)

Technically irregular semiquavers (click to enlarge)

While the second and third notes of each group have stems next to their left side there is some empty (or “white”) space to the left of the fourth note. In order to produce a balanced impression LilyPond now pulls the fourth note slightly to the left, as if that empty space had some gravity. This is a somewhat similar approach to what kerning does in text typography and something that a hand engraver would do as well. It is interesting to compare that with output from other programs, Sibelius, SCORE and Amadeus. While the notes are spaced “perfectly“ in these programs they look irregularly because the white space between the third and fourth notes has more weight than the one before the third note.

Default spacing in Sibelius (click to enlarge)

Default spacing in Sibelius (click to enlarge)

Default spacing in SCORE (click to enlarge)

Default spacing in SCORE (click to enlarge)

Default spacing in Amadeus (click to enlarge)

Default spacing in Amadeus (click to enlarge)

This may seem like a tiny detail, and you may ask why this should matter. But this sort of microtyphography really makes a difference and is one of the reasons why LilyPond scores are so beautiful by default. I can tell you from experience that this difference has direct impact on the readability of the music on the music stand and therefore also affects the actual performance. It is well worth (re-)reading the chapters in LilyPond’s introductory essay on Engraving Details and The LilyPond Story on LilyPond’s website.

So obviously LilyPond is doing “The Right Thing” for that right hand, and in a way it really provides the best result of the competition. But unfortunately it is obviously not the appropriate approach for the whole score, as it causes an unacceptable irregularity in the quavers of the left hand and the cello part. LilyPond should have realized (or been told to do so) that the spacing of the slower notes is more important than that of the faster figuration, and acted accordingly. If you compare LilyPond’s default engraving with solutions by Durand (1886) and Henle (2009) you can see that both publishers prioritize the quavers’ spacing over the semiquavers. But while Henle doesn’t show any optical spacing at all (well, presumably their notation program doesn’t know what this is) the hand-engraved Durand score slightly shifts the fourth semiquaver to the left, leaving more space to the right. The oldest rendering is definitely the best, preserving both regular quavers and optical spacing, while that resulting extra space between the groups even supports the structure and helps the eye.

Default spacing with LilyPond (click to view PDF)

Default spacing with LilyPond (click to view PDF)

Hand engraving by Durand 1886 (click to enlarge)

Hand engraving by Durand 1886 (click to enlarge)

Henle rendering (click to enlarge)

Computer engraving by Henle 2009 (click to enlarge)

Fortunately LilyPond can use the same approach as Henle, which is as simple as inserting \override Score.SpacingSpanner.uniform-stretching = ##t in a stylesheet:

LilyPond engraving with optical spacing switched off (click to view PDF)

LilyPond engraving with optical spacing switched off (click to view PDF)

Do you realize how great that is? LilyPond does not only have a spacing engine that is clearly superior to the competition but it also provides a trivial switch to deactivate it when not appropriate! Do you think one of the other mentioned programs can deliver this? If I’m not mistaken they don’t even have a notion at all of a thing like optical spacing, let alone the option to conveniently switch back and forth between the modes.

But while I’m pretty happy with the rendering of this measure now our journey isn’t over yet. The lack of advanced features makes the competition produce better default results in this case – and that constellation isn’t really extravagant, so LilyPond should actually do better than this. What we need and would want LilyPond to do by default is Durand’s solution: space the quavers regularly but still apply optical improvements to the semiquavers. Or put the other way round: perform that optical spacing magic but notice when side-effects should limit its effect. As LilyPond isn’t able to do that yet we have opened a feature request, but this is probably a pretty involved task and can’t be expected to be implemented very soon. So for now I will have to look for an interim solution that doesn’t get too hacky and is somewhat future-proof. In the third and last part of this series I will demonstrate a number of techniques of separating content from presentation that will hopefully achieve that goal.

by Urs Liska at December 06, 2015 06:30 PM

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

EQ10Q plugins V2.0 released

Pere Ràfols Soler has just announced the latest release of his EQ10Q plugins. The plugins are now out of the beta phase and this is the first stable release of Version 2.0.

With this release, EQ10Q has added mid/side modes for the stereo variant, zoom and scroll for the eq plot window, improved FFT drawings and an optimized GUI.

EQ10Q screenshot

This release also sees the addition of two new plugins, LR2MS and MS2LR, for encoding/decoding mid/side signals.

by Conor at December 06, 2015 01:24 PM

digital audio hacks – Hackaday

A Sound and LED-tastic Tricycle Shopping Cart

What do you get when you take a massive number of LEDs and combine them with a shopping cart and a bicycle? An awesome rave-mobile created by [kramerr]. He’s even taking it one step further by making the electronics solar powered.

[Kramerr] controls the LEDs with multiple WS2803 LED drivers. Three PIC18F4550s control the WS2803s over SPI. He devised a neat way of exciting the LEDs from music by using a pair of graphic equalizer display filter chips, MSGEQ7s, to drive the PICs to create patterns. A USB input also allows the PICs to display song titles or other information.

leds and boards

The mechanical design is as impressive as the electronics. The rear half of a bicycle is welded to the frame of the shopping cart with the cart’s handle used for steering. The shopping cart’s rear wheels are replaced by small bicycle wheels.

But [Kramerr] wasn’t done. He built his own solar panel since he couldn’t find one to fit the size requirements. The panel consists of 26 cells connected in series to provide 1A at 13V on a sunny day. A solar charge controller keeps a standard 12v lead acid battery ready to power the tricycle cart.

And there is still more! There is a sound system driven by a Raspberry Pi. The Pi also drives the USB inputs when [Krameer] wants to display song titles or artists instead of the audio patterns.

There are at least four hacks in this project each worthy of applause. [Karmeer] deserves an ovation for doing all of them in one project. If you are looking for less bling and less pedaling may we direct you to this powered, riding shopping cart.

Some rave music and lights via video after the break.


Filed under: digital audio hacks, led hacks, musical hacks, Raspberry Pi

by Rud Merriam at December 06, 2015 06:01 AM

December 05, 2015

digital audio hacks – Hackaday

Swapping GPIO Pins on the Pi Zero for Audio

The new Raspberry Pi Zero is generating a lot of discussion, especially along the lines of “why didn’t they include…?” One specific complaint has been that audio is only available through the HDMI port. That’s not entirely true as pointed out by Lady Ada over at Adafruit.

Something to remember about the entire Pi family is the pins on the Broadcom processors are multipurpose. Does it increase the confusion or the capabilities? Take your pick. But the key benefit is that different pins can handle the same purpose. For audio the Greater Than Zero Pis (GTZPi) use PWM0_OUT and PWM1_OUT on the processor’s GPIO pins 40 and 45. On the GRZPis these feed a diode, resistor and capacitor network that ends at the audio output jack. They don’t appear on the GPIO connector so cannot be used on the Zero.

The multi-pin, multi-purpose capability of the Broadcom processor allows you to switch PWM0_OUT to GPIO 18 and PWM1_OUT to GPIO 13 or 19. Add the network from the Adafruit note, or check this schematic from the Raspberry Pi site – look at the lower right on the second page.

raspberry_pi_audiofilter

While you’re checking out the audio hack at Adafruit, read through the entirety of Introducing the Raspberry Pi Zero. Lady Ada provides a great description of the Zero and what is needed to start using it.

If you’re looking for Zero hacking ideas you might check the comments in our announcement about the Zero or article on the first hack we received. There is a lot of grist for the hacking mill in them.


Filed under: digital audio hacks, Raspberry Pi

by Rud Merriam at December 05, 2015 09:01 PM

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

Introduction to SuperCollider

This article is the first of a series of articles on LMP that will explore the SuperCollider programming language.  In addition to learning about the language and how to use the program interface, I will also show you how to download SuperCollider and begin experimenting on your own. You will also find links to helpful documents and additional resources throughout the article and in the Links section at the end.

by Scott Petersen at December 05, 2015 06:25 PM

December 04, 2015

rncbc.org

Vee One Suite 0.7.2 - The eighth beta release


Greetings,

The gang of three old-school software instruments, aka. Vee One Suite, comprised of synthv1, as one polyphonic synthesizer, samplv1, a polyphonic sampler and drumkv1, as one drum-kit sampler, are now being released in their eighth official beta iteration.

All still available in dual form:

  • a pure stand-alone JACK client with JACK-session, NSM (Non Session management) and both JACK MIDI and ALSA MIDI input support;
  • a LV2 instrument plug-in.

Change-log:

  • A brand new LFO BPM control parameter is being introduced, as a subordinate to LFO Rate, with follow/sync to current transport/host option (BPM=Auto).
  • LFO Sync (free running) mode option has been introduced.
  • A fourth DCF type has been added: a vocal Formant filter.
  • A third DCF slope/type has been added: the RBJ's bi-quad.
  • Prefer Qt5 over Qt4 by default with configure script.
  • Introducing brand new OUT FX Send parameter per engine.
  • Introducing brand new DCO, LFO Ring Mod(ulator) parameters (synthv1 only).
  • Special value (0=Off) added to DCO1,2 and GEN Glide knob spin-boxes (synthv1 and samplv1).
  • Fixed an old bug that caused an immediate crash on triggering any sample key/element with its (exclusive) Group parameter set to anything but "Off" or "1" (drumkv1 only).

The Vee One Suite are free, open-source Linux Audio software, distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL) version 2 or later.

And here they are!

synthv1 - an old-school polyphonic synthesizer

synthv1 0.7.2 (eighth official beta) is now released!

synthv1 is an old-school all-digital 4-oscillator subtractive polyphonic synthesizer with stereo fx.

LV2 URI: http://synthv1.sourceforge.net/lv2
website:
http://synthv1.sourceforge.net
downloads:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/synthv1/files

Flattr this

samplv1 - an old-school polyphonic sampler

samplv1 0.7.2 (eighth official beta) is released!

samplv1 is an old-school polyphonic sampler synthesizer with stereo fx.

LV2 URI: http://samplv1.sourceforge.net/lv2
website:
http://samplv1.sourceforge.net
downloads:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/samplv1/files

Flattr this

drumkv1 - an old-school drum-kit sampler

drumkv1 0.7.2 (eighth official beta) is released!

drumkv1 is an old-school drum-kit sampler synthesizer with stereo fx.

LV2 URI: http://drumkv1.sourceforge.net/lv2
website:
http://drumkv1.sourceforge.net
downloads:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/drumkv1/files

Flattr this

Enjoy && have (lots of) fun ;)

by rncbc at December 04, 2015 07:30 PM

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] Vee One Suite 0.7.2 - The eighth beta release

Greetings,

The 'the gang of three' old-school software instruments aka. the 'Vee
One Suite', comprised by synthv1 [1], as one polyphonic synthesizer,
samplv1 [2], a polyphonic sampler and drumkv1 [3], as one drum-kit
sampler, are now being released in their eighth official beta iteration.

All still available in dual form:

- a pure stand-alone JACK [4] client with JACK-session, NSM [5] (Non
Session management) and both JACK MIDI and ALSA [6] MIDI input support;
- a LV2 [7] instrument plug-in.

Change-log:
- A brand new LFO BPM control parameter is being introduced, as a
subordinate to LFO Rate, with follow/sync to current transport/host
option (BPM=Ato).
- LFO Sync (free running) mode option has been introduced.
- A fourth DCF type has been added: a vocal Formant filter.
- A third DCF slope/type has been added: the RBJ's bi-quad.
- Prefer Qt5 over Qt4 by default with configure script.
- Introducing brand new OUT FX Send parameter per engine.
- Introducing brand new DCO, LFO Ring Mod(ulator) parameters (synthv1
[1] only).
- Special value (0=Off) added to DCO1,2 and GEN Glide knob spin-boxes
(synthv1 [1] and samplv1 [2]).
- Fixed an old bug that caused an immediate crash on triggering any
sample key/element with its (exclusive) Group parameter set to anything
but "Off" or "1" (drumkv1 [3] only).

The Vee One Suite are free, open-source Linux Audio [9] software,
distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL) [8]
version 2 or later.

And here they are!


**synthv1 - an old-school polyphonic synthesizer [1]**

synthv1 0.7.2 (eighth official beta) is released!

synthv1 is an old-school all-digital 4-oscillator subtractive
polyphonic synthesizer with stereo fx.

LV2 URI: http://synthv1.sourceforge.net/lv2

website:
http://synthv1.sourceforge.net

downloads:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/synthv1/files

- source tarball:
http://download.sourceforge.net/synthv1/synthv1-0.7.2.tar.gz

- source package:

http://download.sourceforge.net/synthv1/synthv1-0.7.2-25.rncbc.suse132.src.rpm

- binary packages:

http://download.sourceforge.net/synthv1/synthv1-0.7.2-25.rncbc.suse132.i586.rpm

http://download.sourceforge.net/synthv1/synthv1-0.7.2-25.rncbc.suse132.x86_84.rpm


**samplv1 - an old-school polyphonic sampler [2]**

samplv1 0.7.2 (eighth official beta) is released!

samplv1 is an old-school polyphonic sampler synthesizer with stereo fx.

LV2 URI: http://samplv1.sourceforge.net/lv2

website:
http://samplv1.sourceforge.net

downloads:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/samplv1/files

- source tarball:
http://download.sourceforge.net/samplv1/samplv1-0.7.2.tar.gz

- source package:

http://download.sourceforge.net/samplv1/samplv1-0.7.2-25.rncbc.suse132.src.rpm

- binary packages:

http://download.sourceforge.net/samplv1/samplv1-0.7.2-25.rncbc.suse132.i586.rpm

http://download.sourceforge.net/samplv1/samplv1-0.7.2-25.rncbc.suse132.x86_84.rpm


**drumkv1 - an old-school drum-kit sampler [3]**

drumkv1 0.7.2 (eighth official beta) is released!

drumkv1 is an old-school drum-kit sampler synthesizer with stereo fx.

LV2 URI: http://drumkv1.sourceforge.net/lv2

website:
http://drumkv1.sourceforge.net

downloads:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/drumkv1/files

- source tarball:
http://download.sourceforge.net/drumkv1/drumkv1-0.7.2.tar.gz

- source package:

http://download.sourceforge.net/drumkv1/drumkv1-0.7.2-21.rncbc.suse132.src.rpm

- binary packages:

http://download.sourceforge.net/drumkv1/drumkv1-0.7.2-21.rncbc.suse132.i586.rpm

http://download.sourceforge.net/drumkv1/drumkv1-0.7.2-21.rncbc.suse132.x86_84.rpm


References:

[1] synthv1 - an old-school polyphonic synthesizer
http://synthv1.sourceforge.net/

[2] samplv1 - an old-school polyphonic sampler
http://samplv1.sourceforge.net/

[3] drumkv1 - an old-school drum-kit sampler
http://drumkv1.sourceforge.net/

[4] JACK Audio Connection Kit
http://jackaudio.org/

[5] NSM, Non Session Management
http://non.tuxfamily.org/nsm/

[6] ALSA, Advanced Linux Sound Architecture
http://www.alsa-project.org/

[7] LV2, Audio Plugin Standard, the extensible successor of LADSPA
http://lv2plug.in/

[8] GNU General Public License
http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/gpl.html

[9] http://linuxaudio.org


See also:
http://www.rncbc.org/drupal/node/974


Enjoy && keep the fun ;)
--
rncbc aka. Rui Nuno Capela
_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-announce mailing list
Linux-audio-announce@lists.linuxaudio.org
http://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-announce

by rncbc.org at December 04, 2015 05:43 PM

[LAA] Ubuntu Studio project lead vote 2016 - open for candidates

Would you be interested in becoming the project lead for Ubuntu Studio,
or know someone who could?

Ubuntu Studio will have its first ever vote for a project lead in 2016.
Read more about it here -
http://ubuntustudio.org/2015/12/project-lead-vote-2016/
_______________________________________________
Linux-audio-announce mailing list
Linux-audio-announce@lists.linuxaudio.org
http://lists.linuxaudio.org/listinfo/linux-audio-announce

by mousike.me at December 04, 2015 10:02 AM

December 03, 2015

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

New song released by John Option

John Option like their bikes so much that they have just released a new song called 'Bike'. Their new song, as with all of John Option releases, is published under the terms of the Creative Commons License Attribution Share Alike.

by Conor at December 03, 2015 03:30 PM

GStreamer News

Official GStreamer GitHub mirror available

Due to popular demand in the past, we now have an official mirror of all GStreamer GIT repositories on GitHub: https://github.com/GStreamer. These are synced every 12-24 hours with the main repositories at http://cgit.freedesktop.org/gstreamer/.

Pull requests are not going to be accepted on GitHub and are going to be closed automatically. Patches should go to Bugzilla as usual, as well as feature requests and bug reports.

See http://gstreamer.freedesktop.org/wiki/SubmittingPatches/ for details and report anything here https://bugzilla.gnome.org/enter_bug.cgi?product=GStreamer

December 03, 2015 02:00 PM

News – Ubuntu Studio

Project Lead Vote 2016

Ubuntu Studio is going to have the first ever vote for the project lead position. Thinking about candidating, or know someone who should? Read on… When is the vote? The vote is preliminary set to January 2016, but will take place no later than April 2016, when the new project lead period begins. Who is […]

by Kaj Ailomaa at December 03, 2015 10:58 AM

Scores of Beauty

Optical Spacing, Tweaks, And A Swan (Part 1)

Those of you who are also reading the lilypond-user mailing list may have noticed from my recent activity that I’ve been dealing with a certain score lately. Actually this is an edition that is right now being printed, and while it is far from being as exciting a project as some other edition projects discussed before on Scores of Beauty I think it’ still a nice one. And I hope it’s acceptable to use this platform for a shameless plug, especially as I will (of course) spice it up with some serious LilyPond discussion.

Today’s post starts a set of two articles that is a little bit of everything: it’s admittedly an advertisment but also a report about LilyPond’s strengths and weaknesses, and it gives insights in some useful techniques.

A New Suit For The Swan

Occasionally I accompany my son who’s been playing cello for a few years now. Recently we played together in his school orchestra’s performance of the “Carnaval des animaux” by Saint-Saëns, and now we’re playing the beautiful “Swan” in its even more famous incarnation as a separate piece for cello and one piano. Laying hands on this version for the first time I was irritated by a few awkward sounds and soon realized that the dedicatee, cellist Charles Joseph Lebouc, hadn’t created a proper arrangement. Instead the well-known version simply leaves out one of the two original piano parts. This explained the perceived flaws in the voice-leading, but also seemed to call for an appropriate response. After some pondering I decided to handle the situation not with a few superficial fixes but with a completely new arrangement. So in the last weeks I prepared an edition of the Swan with a new piano version that faithfully combines both piano parts to be played by one pianist. This is, of course, more demanding than the well-known version but performers and listeners are rewarded with the full sonority of the original.

It is surprising to see that such an arrangement places a spotlight on a harmonic delicacy of the composition that can easily go by unnoticed otherwise. Consider this excerpt from the middle section, which you can also take as an example for the arrangement in general:

Excerpt (click to view PDF)

Excerpt (click to view PDF)

If you look at the second measure you can see the bass line playing a quaver figuration, first in g major and then – masked – in g minor. At this point the middle voice plays a semiquaver figuration of a diminished 7th chord belonging to a major. OK, it would be possible to explain the left hand in the context of a major too (with a diminished 9 and a suspended 4), but that is rather far-fetched. I think the measure is described much better as a somewhat “bitonal” clash of sounds resulting from two chord progressions moving independently. In any case, the distribution of the middle voice over two hands makes it pretty hard to achieve the required evenness and delicacy for the semiquavers and at the same time bring out the bass line in a sufficiently linear, polyphonic fashion. This is where this new arrangement is actually demanding.

I am happy to announce that the new edition is now available from sound-rel, the publisher that also took responsibility for Oskar Fried’s songs, a project that has extensively been covered on this blog. It is available for violoncello and a number of alternative solo instruments, and additionally there is a (historical) arrangement for medium voice and piano which I also adapted to my new accompaniment. I think it has turned out beautifully (not the least due to the nice cover image we got from Roman Lang, the illustrator of a number of children’s books well-known at least in Germany). Apart from being a very thin volume it is made with the same love for detail and beauty as the earlier Oskar Fried edition.

We have worked hard to finish it in time for your christmas shopping 😉 . But to be serious: by ordering the new “Swan” you will also support the publisher to cover the still open costs of the earlier award winning edition. (If that should ever happen we could finally make the source code of our edition publicly available.) You can find more details about the available options and prices on the (German-only, sorry) detail page of sound-rel’s website.

An “Annoying Feature”?

So, what’s the point in announcing an edition on Scores of Beauty, does the fact that it has been realized with LilyPond justify a post? I would support this as I’ve contributed quite a lot so I can “afford” a little selfishness occasionally. But moreover, this is a post about LilyPond, it just became too long once more, and so I decided to split it into two parts, the second part dealing with LilyPond issues again.

While working with LilyPond was in general a pleasant undertaking I ran into one issue that is worth sharing and discussing here on our blog. At one point in time I realized that LilyPond’s default engraving was in a way beautiful as always but at the same time exposed a fundamentally flawed horizontal spacing:

Surprisingly irregular default spacing (click to enlarge)

Surprisingly irregular default spacing (click to enlarge)

This irregularity is totally unacceptable, and I wondered how LilyPond could actually be doing this. In the next post I will tell you why this issue is actually related to a major LilyPond strength, and how I could gracefully overcome the limitation.

(click to visit the illustrator's website)

(© 2015, Roman Lang, click to visit the illustrator’s website)

by Urs Liska at December 03, 2015 08:49 AM

December 02, 2015

Linux Audio Users & Musicians Video Blog

John Option – Bike

New video from “John Option”.

The song is published under the terms of the Creative Commons License
(CC-BY-SA) and it’s completely produced with free software:
Ardour, Hydrogen, Jack, Qsynth, CALF, and many other
great free audio software that we used under Debian GNU/Linux.

You can listen the single and see the video (made with kdenlive).

As for the previous songs we have done a little more in the direction of
freedom and we published in our website the single recording tracks
and the complete Ardour session. All this material is published under
the terms of the Creative Commons license Attribution Share alike so
that anyone can use our tracks to produce a remix of our song or even a
new song that have to be published under the same license.

You can find all about our project here: http://johnoption.org

I hope that you like our choice of freedom. If you feel like I’d love
to read your feedback, because the encouragement of the people who
listen to us and appreciate the philosophy of our project is the only
fuel for us to continue. And if you like to be updated about our next
release, please subscribe to our YouTube channel or any other social
network you like (see link to our profiles on our website).



by DJ Kotau at December 02, 2015 11:39 AM

digital audio hacks – Hackaday

Audio Effects on the Intel Edison

With the ability to run a full Linux operating system, the Intel Edison board has more than enough computing power for real-time digital audio processing. [Navin] used the Atom based module to build Effecter: a digital effects processor.

Effecter is written in C, and makes use of two libraries. The MRAA library from Intel provides an API for accessing the I/O ports on the Edison module. PortAudio is the library used for capturing and playing back audio samples.

F9GW4Y4IGQFYP23.MEDIUMTo allow for audio input and output, a sound card is needed. A cheap USB sound card takes care of this, since the Edison does not have built-in hardware for audio. The Edison itself is mounted on the Edison Arduino Breakout Board, and combined with a Grove shield from Seeed. Using the Grove system, a button, potentiometer, and LCD were added for control.

The code is available on Github, and is pretty easy to follow. PortAudio calls the audioCallback function in effecter.cc when it needs samples to play. This function takes samples from the input buffer, runs them through an effect’s function, and spits the resulting samples into the output buffer. All of the effect code can be found in the ‘effects’ folder.

You can check out a demo Effecter applying effects to a keyboard after the break. If you want to build your own, an Instructable gives all the steps.


Filed under: digital audio hacks

by Eric Evenchick at December 02, 2015 09:00 AM

November 30, 2015

Linux – cdm createdigitalmusic

Synth meets soft: how to use hardware inside Bitwig

As more people bring home hardware, the next question is how to get that running smoothly with software – for recording and control.

We just saw a really great tutorial for doing it in Reaper, using our MeeBlip synth. Now there’s another unsolicited MeeBlip tutorial (really, I had nothing to do with this), this time with Bitwig Studio. Watch at top.

Some nice mobile hardware in general, too – the Keith McMillen K-Board is definitely the smallest effective keyboard I’ve found, plus the KORG nanoPAD2, the best little drum pads I’ve found, plus the iConnectMIDI4+, which is the most flexible solution for using iOS devices, MIDI gear, and computers together (in various combinations).

And then there’s a trick we probably haven’t publicized enough – you can plug a 9V battery into the anode with a battery adapter, so you don’t need a wall wart.

kmi

meeblip-9v

More details here – at a site that’s chock full of great Bitwig Studio tips. (I’m double interested in those, having seen how nice the touch implementation in the new version is.)

Control and Record MeeBlip anode in Bitwig Studio [factotumo]

Ben Schmaus is behind this one.

Find the MeeBlip anode (with a special sale on):
meeblip.com

It’d be great to have a round-up of similar hardware advice for newcomers in various hosts. (And no, you don’t have to use MeeBlip!)

The post Synth meets soft: how to use hardware inside Bitwig appeared first on cdm createdigitalmusic.

by Peter Kirn at November 30, 2015 04:33 PM

November 27, 2015

Scores of Beauty

Just Intonation – Semantic Encoding with LilyPond

Recently we have discussed LilyPond’s capabilities for engraving contemporary music. It seems many composers consider extended notation with the computer a daunting task and prefer using graphical approaches for it, like drawing tools in graphical programs or even post-processing scores in graphics programs like Inkscape or Illustrator. However, while this may seem straightforward, I’ve always felt it’s conceptually inferior, mostly because this approach is a one-way street: once you have edited the resulting PDF in a drawing program you can’t ever go back to editing the content of the score. LilyPond gives you the option of encoding what you mean, and while it is admittedly a complex task to create extended notation with it, I definitely think this feature alone makes it worth the trouble. Of course you have to consider that a composer doesn’t necessarily have to do the programming himself, there will usually be generous help from the community. And developing a library specifically addressing contemporary notation needs will (hopefully) be an extremely powerful asset for the LilyPond toolkit.

In two posts I’m going to demonstrate you one example that clearly makes this point – encoding and displaying Just Intonation.

Just Intonation – Some Background

One of the composers involved in the mentioned discussion uses “Just intonation”, actually a very old concept but one that became fruitful in composition (again) only recently in a tendency of composition called spectralism. This is a concept about pitch and harmony that is fundamentally different from what we are used to in Western music, but I can of course only touch the surface of it here. One main aspect is that the basis for pitches is not the octave and an arbitrary equal division of it, be it the common twelve semitones or other systems that divide the whole tone in three, four, six or eight subdivisions – or the octave in an arbitrary number of steps, for example 19 (see Steve Altoft’s website for an example of practical use). Instead, just intonation retrieves its pitch material from a fundamental tone and its harmonics. Probably you all know this scale:

Idealized harmonic scale (click to enlarge)

Idealized harmonic scale (click to enlarge)

If we take the c (in LilyPond terminology) as the fundamental, this represents the ratios of 1/1, 2/1, 3/1 throughout 8/1, in other words the first eight partials of the harmonic series. However, many of these harmonics are not quite the same as the shown pitches of the tempered scale we commonly use in Western music. Notating them like in the above example is actually a pretty fishy compromise, and composers have struggled a lot about how to deal with the issue. One common approach is to use the tempered pitch and add a textual information giving the deviation in “cent” – which is an equal division of a semitone in 100, or of an octave in 1.200 steps. The above example would thus be notated as:

Harmonic series with cent deviations (click to enlarge)

Harmonic series with cent deviations (click to enlarge)

Another example is a kind of scale over the middle c, using consecutive ratios of 10/9, 9/8, 8/7 down to 2/1. This “scale” could look like this:

Consecutive ratios (click to enlarge)

Consecutive ratios (click to enlarge)

If you think that this can be applied to arbitrary fundamental pitches you can see that just intonation has a distinct – and extraordinarily rich – harmonic and melodic repertoire to draw from.

Implementing Just Intonation in LilyPond

OK, all of this could be notated without much difficulties with LilyPond’s regular tools, and also with other notation programs – simply add a text with the cent deviation and/or notate it like regular string harmonics. But what if LilyPond were able to let you encode pitches through what they are – harmonics over fundamentals – and properly visualize it in a configurable manner, automatically doing the right thing? Well, this is what we are going to see now. There will be a long way until it is usable in real-world scores, actually it’s just a proof-of-concept worth an afternoon’s work. But it clearly shows where this might lead to and why text based tools are inherently more powerful than their graphical competitors.

A User Interface

What do we want? We want to encode pitches as harmonics over a fundamental, so we need to provide a base pitch, a ratio, and optionally a duration. For our example we will implement all this as a “music function” (see an earlier post) for more in-depth information). Integrating just intonation so we can use it like regular pitches would be nice but this is out of scope for the proof-of-concept. Another decision I made is that the fundamental note is not given to that function but has to be set separately – otherwise we’d have to pass it to each pitch individually.

We start with a dummy interface function to see what we’re going to achieve:

% A dummy interface for notating pitches in just intonation
jiPitch =
#(define-music-function (dur ratio)
   ((ly:duration?) fraction?)
   #{ #})

{
  \jiPitch 3/2
  \jiPitch 2 4/3
}

This function expects an optional duration and a fraction as its arguments and for now returns an empty music expression. Compiling this snippet returns a score with only the first c', demonstrating that the interface works.

Initially we will have our resulting pitches as ratios over the middle c' – which is Lilypond’s “zero” pitch. Supplying the 3/2 and 4/3 ratios should result in – approximately – g' and f', the perfect fifth and fourth over the middle c. What we want to achieve is LilyPond notating the closest pitch in tempered tuning plus a text specifying the “cent” deviation.

The Basic Calculations

Ratio To Cents

The first thing we do is converting the ratio in a cent value over the fundamental. We expect two values quite near 700 and 500 – the cent correspondences to a fifth and a fourth. The mathematical function is that for any ratio f1/f2 the corresponding cent value I is I = 1200 * ln (f1/f2) / ln(2), which can easily be expressed in a Scheme function. As we are interested in the step and not in the total cent value we do the multiplication with 12 instead of 1200. This will result in a floating point number whose integer and fractional parts represent the chromatic steps and the (per)cent portion:

% Take the ratio of a partial and return the corresponding cent value
% relative to a fundamental
#(define (ratio->cent ratio)%
   (* 12 (/ (log ratio) (log 2))))

This gives us the expected results:

(ratio->cent 3/2) => 7.01955000865387
(ratio->cent 4/3) => 4.98044999134612

Steps and deviation

In order to display the resulting pitch and deviation we need to split that number into its integer and (processed) fractional parts. We want to round the deviation to be expressed in simple cent values – and we want to display the closest pitch, thus flipping around some values when the cent deviation is greater than 50. I won’t go into details about these Scheme functions as this is not a Scheme tutorial. But actually it’s quite basic arithmetics:

% Take a fraction and return a list with 
% - the pitch in semitones
% - the cent deviation above or below (rounded)
#(define (ratio->step-deviation ratio)
   (let*
    ;; calculate cent value over the fundamental
    ((step-cent (ratio->cent ratio))
     ;; split that in the step and the cent part
     (step (inexact->exact (round step-cent)))
     (cent-deviation (inexact->exact (round (* 100 (- step-cent step))))))
    (cons step cent-deviation)))

Now we get

(ratio->step-deviation 3/2) => (7 . 2)
(ratio->step-deviation 4/3) => (5 . -2)

correctly indicating 2 cent above and below the 7th and 5th semitones.

Prospect

Basically we now have all the information we need for properly displaying pitches specified in just intonation. In the second post we’ll see a few appraoches how we can do that to provide automatic rendering of just intonation pitches in LilyPond. Stay tuned …

by Urs Liska at November 27, 2015 08:00 PM

November 25, 2015

Libre Music Production - Articles, Tutorials and News

November 24, 2015

Linux Audio Announcements - laa@linuxaudio.org

[LAA] The Open Source Musician Podcast is back!

After an unintentional hiatus, the show is back! We've moved hosts away
from libsyn to archive.org which allows us to provide alternative download
formats like flac and ogg. All 71 episodes can now be found at
https://archive.org/details/osmpodcast.

71 you ask?
That's right, a new episode is now out! I chat with falkTX about MOD and
sundry other things. We also announce the opening of a new tunestorm due 1
January!

https://archive.org/details/OSMP71

OSMP Episode 71 - Talking with Filipe about MOD
We've moved to archive.org! You can find all the episodes now at
https://archive.org/details/osmpodcast
and each episode is at https://archive.org/details/OSMP71 etc.

Interview with falkTX and we talk a lot about the MOD pedal (moddevices.com)

We decide to do another tunestorm. Tunestorm 13 is themed "holiday." Record
an original composition about any holiday and send it in by 1 Jan 2016!
(See opensourcemusician.com/index.php/Tunestorm for more info).

Send entries to contributions at opensourcemusician dot com

Contact Info:
Email: contributions at opensourcemusician dot com
Wiki: http://opensourcemusician.com
IRC: irc.freenode.net/#opensourcemusicians

Enjoy!
_Spencer

by gmail.com at November 24, 2015 06:50 PM

OSM podcast

November 20, 2015

Linux – cdm createdigitalmusic

Use a hardware synth like it’s a plug-in – in a $60 DAW

meeblipreaper

With a little setup, you can integrate a hardware synth with Reaper as if it’s a software plug-in. Check out the video tutorial from The Reaper Blog to see how.

Reaper is a terrific “indie” DAW for the budget-conscious. Just $60 buys you an individual personal license with a bunch of free upgrades. (“Commercial” use is described as anyone making more than $20k a year – plenty of very serious musicians make less than that.)

The price is nice, but an even better reason to respect Reaper is that the developers at Cockos consistently pack in lots of engineering details. The ReaInsert plug-in seen here is a good example. ReaInsert lets you individually map sends and returns for audio, remap MIDI channels, define volume for sends and returns, and even “ping” to automatically set delay compensation, all via a single interface. All of this is possible in other DAWs, but typically with more manual configuration in different locations, not what’s available here in this integrated interface.

And the upshot of all of that is, after configuring the tutorial, you can “set it and forget it” – using any synth as if it’s software. (Kudos to Elektron for their cool Overbridge tech, but this can cover everything else.)

So let’s add up costs: Reaper is sixty bucks, our newest MeeBlip anode will set you back $120 (now, ahem, with free shipping, the Marketing Department would like to remind you, that department also being, erm, me) — throw in an audio/MIDI interface and you’re ready to go.

Thanks, Jon, for the tutorial and the opportunity for some blatant synth promotion. Now I’m going to check out these other tutorials, and consider doing the next track in Reaper.

Using Hardware Synths with ReaInsert

The post Use a hardware synth like it’s a plug-in – in a $60 DAW appeared first on cdm createdigitalmusic.

by Peter Kirn at November 20, 2015 11:33 AM